Beige color pink based?

JDs

Curly Hair Geek
#1
Why when using a Beige based color, does the color on the hair usually have a "pinkish" tone to it? Isn't beige a brown base?
 

Jeni Giles

Well-Known Member
#2
Beige is usually violet based and if the hair is over lightened it will reflect pink, usually more of a mauve tone- I've done this to my Mother a couple of times now when experimenting with new toners, thankfully the color wheel still works and I was able to use a green color corrector at the shampoo bowl to counter act the pink- pink is just a lighter shade of red, so by adding green I've corrected the problem.

Beige is misleading because we generally think of a neutral color at a light level, to achieve this the toner is a violet or red violet thus giving us a neutral shade.
 

minky

Well-Known Member
#3
Beige is usually violet based and if the hair is over lightened it will reflect pink, usually more of a mauve tone- I've done this to my Mother a couple of times now when experimenting with new toners, thankfully the color wheel still works and I was able to use a green color corrector at the shampoo bowl to counter act the pink- pink is just a lighter shade of red, so by adding green I've corrected the problem.

Beige is misleading because we generally think of a neutral color at a light level, to achieve this the toner is a violet or red violet thus giving us a neutral shade.
I must admit I think that is very brave of you using green , i am always very worried about correcting with green or ash toners especially on light blonde hair because of the grab factor :eek: , I usually stick to mild silverising ones .eg C/ fresh 0/6 roots first ends after 10 , [ playing safe ]

so would you just use a tiny bit of green concentrate or something else?
I am really fascinated by colour correction , from minky:)
 

Jeni Giles

Well-Known Member
#4
I must admit I think that is very brave of you using green , i am always very worried about correcting with green or ash toners especially on light blonde hair because of the grab factor :eek: , I usually stick to mild silverising ones .eg C/ fresh 0/6 roots first ends after 10 , [ playing safe ]

so would you just use a tiny bit of green concentrate or something else?
I am really fascinated by colour correction , from minky:)
I really recommend a test strand first, on an inconspicuous piece when in doubt. If your unwanted tone is still REALLY orange then yes, I would use a blue voilet or ash depending on the amount of coolness desired. I may use mostly a silverising one and just add a small amount of green. We use L'oreal their green is .07 and can be found only at levels 4,5 and 6 where red occurs most frequently. When lifting over artificial pigment you may run into red and need to use a color corrector or concentrate.

BE VERY careful using correctors or concentrates because they are PURE pigments, the have no level of lightness or darkness they are straight color. Save yourself some swatches or you can order them from Pivot Point International, bleach them out and then try different tones to see what your color line will do. This is the easiest way to learn what your chosen line of color will do and will make a more realistic "swatch book" than what is sent by the Manufacturer.
HTH
 

minky

Well-Known Member
#5
I really recommend a test strand first, on an inconspicuous piece when in doubt. If your unwanted tone is still REALLY orange then yes, I would use a blue voilet or ash depending on the amount of coolness desired. I may use mostly a silverising one and just add a small amount of green. We use L'oreal their green is .07 and can be found only at levels 4,5 and 6 where red occurs most frequently. When lifting over artificial pigment you may run into red and need to use a color corrector or concentrate.

BE VERY careful using correctors or concentrates because they are PURE pigments, the have no level of lightness or darkness they are straight color. Save yourself some swatches or you can order them from Pivot Point International, bleach them out and then try different tones to see what your color line will do. This is the easiest way to learn what your chosen line of color will do and will make a more realistic "swatch book" than what is sent by the Manufacturer.
HTH
thank you for some really good advice .:) minky
 
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