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Brisa UV Lamp - burning!

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SuZou

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Please could someone tell me why I get a 'burning' sensation when curing Brisa Gel enhancements using the Brisa UV lamp?

What do I tell my clients as to why this is happening? I also have a personal concern as I myself have experienced this burning. Is it 100% safe as this definitely does not feel right to me? Are there long-term health implications if I/clients continue to experience this very unpleasant sensation?

In addition to the burning, I also experienced a similar 'heat' like sensation when soaking off the gel in Acetone. One of my nails was so painful that I had to stop the soaking process and I had to leave it to grow out. Interestingly, it was the same nail that I felt the burning sensation when using the lamp!

Don't get me wrong, I love the new Brisa product, it’s just the problems with the UV lamp that is causing me concern.
 

naturalnails

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In general gel will give a heat sensation either because the gel is too thick and gives too much of a chemical reaction or if the nail plates are overly thin or weak making them more sensitive to the heat.

HTH.
 

SuZou

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Hi There!

Thanks for your reply, but please see message above again. I was having problems posting the whole message before.
 

naturalnails

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OK I have read the whole message now and it leads me to a couple of questions:

1. is this the first gel you have tried or have you successfully tried others?

2. Does this heat occur on all clients on all fingers or only some?

3. are you doing several thin coats and building the nail that way or are you putting only one or two thicker coats?

In general gel does not soak off in acetone unless it is one that says it does.

I am certainly no gel expert and maybe a gellier person could shed some more light (oops sorry LOL)
 

Prionace

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Actually, i've been told that the "heat" sensation is shrinkage of the gel when curing, not noticeble when a thin layer is applied like the bonding or gloss layer, but a little painful when the building layer is applied. This "heat" sensation only last 10-20 sec and then everything goes back to normal.
 

diesel1978

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I don't know if this is correct.....but i was always taught that gels were not suitable for those with sensitive skin. I personally have sensitive skin and it does'nt matter what gel system i try i always get a burning sensation the minute my nails go under any lamp.
 

SuZou

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Thanks for the replies ladies, but it doesn't answer the questions:

Is it safe?
Will there be long-term health damage?
If you can't soak them off in Acetone, what should I be using?

In response to 'naturalnails' further questions:

1) Yes, first gel I've tried.
2) Yes, but I've only done myself, plus two other clients.
3) I'm doing several thin layers as I was taught by my CND Ambassador.
 

The Geek

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Fiona was correct in her first post.

All systems give off a small amount of heat duing polymerization. This heat is called an 'exotherm'.
The amount of photoinitiator, the sensitivity of the photoinitiator, and the UV emissions from the light will dictate how much exotherm is produced during polyerization.

'Cool gels' are usually gels that contain either low amounts of photoinitiators, low sensativity photoinitiators, and/or use low UV emission UV lights. The term 'Cool gel' simply means that it is less likely to generate a great deal of heat during polymerization.

Brisa falls into this category as it uses a very low amount of photoinitiator.

Saying that, any gel can still produce enough heat to burn a client because every gel gives off heat during polymerization. Where you run into a risk of getting a heat spike is from one or more of the following:
  • Thin natural nails - The thinner the nail, the less heat is required to feel it.
  • Thick application - The thicker the application, the longer it takes for the heat to dissapate, therefore the more heat will build up.
  • Wrong UV light - A light with too high of UV emissions will cause the product to cure much faster and thus produce more heat.
I am not sure why your fingers would burn in acetone unless you have a cut or abrasion. Brisa is not really a removable gel. Yes it will soak off, but it takes yonks to do so and therefore is not overly practical.

Hope this helps
 

SuZou

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Many thanks 'Nail Geek' for your in-depth and scientific explanation. Its mucho appreciated.

So if "Brisa is not really a removable gel...", how do I take them off if a client wants them removing?
 

Prionace

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I hope i don't make any mistakes, but the only way to remove a non soakable gel is to file the gel off, being very carefully not to file on the natural nail, and leaving a very thin layer of gel in the end, this layer is hardly noticeble and will eventually grow off. I don't know is when removing gel for aplication of another system you can still leave this thin layer or if you have to remove the gel completely.
 

geeg

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Prionace said:
I hope i don't make any mistakes, but the only way to remove a non soakable gel is to file the gel off, being very carefully not to file on the natural nail, and leaving a very thin layer of gel in the end, this layer is hardly noticeble and will eventually grow off. I don't know is when removing gel for aplication of another system you can still leave this thin layer or if you have to remove the gel completely.
If the thin layer that is left on the nail is still bonded well to the surface, then there isno problem in overlaying with a different product.
 

Kellyc

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I had the burning sensation this evening when doing my own nails, i dont normally get it but my nail plates are very thin at the mo and this i believe is why i get it, however not all my clients get the 'burning' sensation (or if they do they grin and bare it lol!) and i have always used the gel system but if a client does then i was told to press your fingers down slightly or if it is too much pull them out of the light for a few seconds and then put them back in please do quote me if i am wrong, but i found this evening that whilst pushing down on the tips of my fingers in the lamp it eased off.
 

Nailsinlondon1

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I just like to add lol..........
If a client is very sensitive or has bvery thin nail plates, simply place the nails for a second under the UV light, a quick in out movement, then place back under the light for the rest of the curing time.................

As for a heat sensation in acetone: There is only pain if
  1. the nail has been mechanicly thinned and is seriously damaged
  2. If the nail has been broken and the nailbed is exposed to Acetone, then this will sting like mad.
  3. Acetone has been warmed up to the point of bubbling in the soak of dish............ This causes a severe heat sensation.............
Just my pennies worth lol
HTH
 

SuZou

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Thanks Dudes & Dudettes for all the responses.

I feel much happier now about using the lamp!
 

SuZou

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The Nail Geek said:
Fiona was correct in her first post.

All systems give off a small amount of heat duing polymerization. This heat is called an 'exotherm'.
The amount of photoinitiator, the sensitivity of the photoinitiator, and the UV emissions from the light will dictate how much exotherm is produced during polyerization.

'Cool gels' are usually gels that contain either low amounts of photoinitiators, low sensativity photoinitiators, and/or use low UV emission UV lights. The term 'Cool gel' simply means that it is less likely to generate a great deal of heat during polymerization.

Brisa falls into this category as it uses a very low amount of photoinitiator.

Saying that, any gel can still produce enough heat to burn a client because every gel gives off heat during polymerization. Where you run into a risk of getting a heat spike is from one or more of the following:
  • Thin natural nails - The thinner the nail, the less heat is required to feel it.
  • Thick application - The thicker the application, the longer it takes for the heat to dissapate, therefore the more heat will build up.
  • Wrong UV light - A light with too high of UV emissions will cause the product to cure much faster and thus produce more heat.
I am not sure why your fingers would burn in acetone unless you have a cut or abrasion. Brisa is not really a removable gel. Yes it will soak off, but it takes yonks to do so and therefore is not overly practical.

Hope this helps
Hi again Nail Geek

I have a couple of further questions regarding the new Brisa UV Lamp please.

1] What UV does the Brisa Lamp use - A, B, or C?
2] If the lamp uses UVA, are the wavelengths emitted by ultraviolet, incandescent 'blacklights', Fluorescent 'blacklights', high pressure mercury 'blacklights',or some other method?
3] What wattage are the lamps - 9 watt, 27 watt or other?

Cheers!
 

The Geek

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1- The lamps emit UVA (I think all do)
2- UV - the 'black lights' are only there so you can see that the lamp is on. All UV lamps UV emissions degrade to the stop point long before the visible lights burn out
3- 27watt but remember that the wattage has very little to do with UV emissions. Many 4w bulbs we tested emitted more UV light than many 9w bulbs!

Bulb posistioning and shape also greatly affect UV emissions.

Hope this helps
 

fidev

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Hi guys,
I was taught that if there is any uncomfortable heat sensation (usually during curing of the builder gel layer...for the aforementioned reasons) the best way to get rid of it is to take nails from the lamp and give 2 or 3 wee taps with the nails onto the table.......works for me every time!! :biggrin:

love Fiona x.
 

SuZou

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The Nail Geek said:
1- The lamps emit UVA (I think all do)
2- UV - the 'black lights' are only there so you can see that the lamp is on. All UV lamps UV emissions degrade to the stop point long before the visible lights burn out
3- 27watt but remember that the wattage has very little to do with UV emissions. Many 4w bulbs we tested emitted more UV light than many 9w bulbs!

Bulb posistioning and shape also greatly affect UV emissions.

Hope this helps
Cheers for the clarification!
 

Debs

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I have to add to this post regarding the burning..........I was taught, wait for it..........when clients experience burning, to smack them with your file and the burning goes away..................How funny is that, thank goodness for decent training is all I can say, can you imagine smacking all your clients, how many of us would get a smack back for doing that?
 

geeg

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At the show in London, I put demo Brisa Nails on hundreds of people along with Mandy my partner. Never stopped even for a break from 8:30am until 6:30pm ...

ONly one person in all those hundreds said that she felt an uncomfortable sensation of heat. Brisa gels do not emit more than a warm sensation normally, and most cannot feel anything at all. Low heat was one of the main things that we wanted in a new and different gel and with the odd (not meaning you are ...ODD) exception, this is what we have in Brisa.
 
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