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CND D Sperse, what can be used as an alternative?

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Vixano

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Hello Wise ones!
I cannot get hold of any D Sperse o_O What can be used instead?

Many thanks in advance,

Vix
 

Trinity

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Hi, it's just isopropal alcohol - often called IPA - any gel clenser will do the job. If you're really desperate Vodka works, as do some baby wipes (with a high IPA content) but they're really for desperate situations 😆 ;)

ETA - don't try Surgical Spirit it doesn't work. It works for about 10 seconds then goes sticky
 
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jlsdds

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In the USA we use isopropyl alcohol that is labeled 99% alcohol. Same thing, but doesn’t the marketing make it sound better and stronger?
 

Trinity

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In the USA we use isopropyl alcohol that is labeled 99% alcohol. Same thing, but doesn’t the marketing make it sound better and stronger?
IPA isn't a well known and sold product over here, I know you guys have been using it for years, and I think it's also called rubbing alcohol?? is that right?

We don't (or rarely) have it available in general shops with cleaning materials, etc. It's only really available in beauty supply distributors. It's becoming more readily available on sites such as Amazon and eBay as more American cleaning methods and hacks come over the pond and people are finding out about it's cleaning capabilities.
 

jlsdds

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In the US rubbing alcohol is 70%. For the gel dispersion layer we used 99%, which is widely available here. (I’m learning so much about UK). Apparently, d.sperse is not available outside of UK, right?

The state I lived in had a law that alcohol couldn’t be used for sanitation or cleaning. I was in the habit of spraying everything with 70%, i.e., desk, chair, lamp.

Interesting because according to our Center for Disease Control, 70% can penetrate the cell membrane and kill the organism, whilst 99% is so strong it ‘freezes’ the cell membrane and ‘traps’ the organism, but doesn’t kill it outright.
 

Trinity

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IPA isn't a well known and sold product over here, I know you guys have been using it for years, and I think it's also called rubbing alcohol?? is that right?

We don't (or rarely) have it available in general shops with cleaning materials, etc. It's only really available in beauty supply distributors. It's becoming more readily available on sites such as Amazon and eBay as more American cleaning methods and hacks come over the pond and people are finding out about it's cleaning capabilities.
It's fascinating the differences o_O

I assumed rubbing alcohol was the same as IPA, but it appears it's the same stuff just a little more diluted, so I wasn't far off.

Yes D:Sperse was a UK product created by the offical UK Distributor of CND (a company called Sweet Squared) because when Shellac was launched over here we didn't have IPA in any form readily available so they created D:Sperse for the UK market.

It was/is super expensive, less so now as it's more readily available, and there are other brand alternatives too, but all 99% IPA.

We don't really use it as a cleaning product, purely as a gel residue remover and some brands suggest it as a dehydrator too.
 

Trinity

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The state I lived in had a law that alcohol couldn’t be used for sanitation or cleaning. I was in the habit of spraying everything with 70%, i.e., desk, chair, lamp.

Interesting because according to our Center for Disease Control, 70% can penetrate the cell membrane and kill the organism, whilst 99% is so strong it ‘freezes’ the cell membrane and ‘traps’ the organism, but doesn’t kill it outright.
On a cleaning point, I think it's our Canadian counterparts who are not allowed to let santisied products air dry, they have to be in a bag to dry. This absolutely baffles me because you can't avoid the air so even newly sanitised products taken out of a bag are exposed to it immediately.

If it any wonder newbie techs get confused, they watch something on the internet and don't necessarily know it's origin so it's easy to get confused.
 

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