Quantcast

Coming to the end of my Level 3

SalonGeek

Help Support SalonGeek:

AllanJudge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
456
Reaction score
182
Location
Liverpool
... And tbh I haven't learnt much at all.

I thought id finish the course and feel confident and ready to get a job in a salon. I've tweaked my CV loads but what happens when I go for an interview?

I can't choose colours for people, I know the basics of colour theory but that's it. I feel like we haven't done anything advanced.

Everytime I tell my tutors I feel like the course is too basic - I'm told 'we're delivering what is in the curriculum' and I'm told that if I want to learn things like balayage and precision cutting that I'll need to go on little courses to learn these skills.

I plan to go on courses throughout my career, but I don't think I should be leaving a level 3 course with just a piece of paper and next to no knowledge.

I'm gutted and just feel like giving hairdressing up now.
 

jmoseley07

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2015
Messages
253
Reaction score
79
Location
Blackpool
I think you should try being a junior for abit. This is what I did and learnt so much throughout, I was a junior for about 4 years before becoming a stylist x
 

AllanJudge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
456
Reaction score
182
Location
Liverpool
How old were you when you done that? X
 

RED STAR

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2014
Messages
1,529
Reaction score
1,792
Location
Bexley, Kent
... And tbh I haven't learnt much at all.

I thought id finish the course and feel confident and ready to get a job in a salon. I've tweaked my CV loads but what happens when I go for an interview?

I can't choose colours for people, I know the basics of colour theory but that's it. I feel like we haven't done anything advanced.

Everytime I tell my tutors I feel like the course is too basic - I'm told 'we're delivering what is in the curriculum' and I'm told that if I want to learn things like balayage and precision cutting that I'll need to go on little courses to learn these skills.

I plan to go on courses throughout my career, but I don't think I should be leaving a level 3 course with just a piece of paper and next to no knowledge.

I'm gutted and just feel like giving hairdressing up now.
I've just this minute started a thread about this EXACT subject!
I've had so many newly qualified through my door with
ZERO CONFIDENCE + INCOMPLETE KNOWLEDGE to get them started!

I'm actually really cross with the way training is being delivered.:mad:

IMO Training suppliers are promising much, and delivering little.
The curriculum needs a shake up!
I've heard of students being told to 'Check it out on you tube', when they ask for more help......not helpful What you REALLY NEED is TIME, PATIENCE, AND LOT'S AND LOT'S OF PRACTICE.

Training providers filling the heads of students with 'fluff & stuff'.
'Promising' them positions in top salon's, spa's and cruise ship's, is unrealistic.......
They all need further training, but are often unprepared for this, as you are now finding.
Don't give up... get yourself in a good salon, and continue to learn, as we all do!:cool:
 

surf girl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Messages
5,709
Reaction score
2,400
Location
Blackwood

Nicky G

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
81
Reaction score
31
Location
Cheshire
I really don't see how anyone can learn all in a couple of years. It's practice, practice, practice. You need to be doing the job day in day out and learning all the time. I agree a junior job is best for girls to start with. When I was training it was 5 years before you was classed a fully qualified. 3 years college and salon. Then 2 years as an improver. You have to want to learn techniques. I'm 47 and always learning new techniques and products. So you need to be patient and work at it. It's an art and has to come from you. Working I salons with lots of different stylist you will see lots of different ways. I don't believe it can all just be taught....
 

jmoseley07

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2015
Messages
253
Reaction score
79
Location
Blackpool
How old were you when you done that? X
I came straight out of school at 16 and into college doing my 3 years there. I was fortunate to become a junior in my first year along side college and was doing this for 4 years. Then my boss dropped the bomb shell on me that he was leaving and I took over from there on my own becoming a stylist! I got chucked in at the deep end but if it wasn't for those 4 years as a junior and learning everything from the boss then I wouldn't be where I am today x
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Premium Geek
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
10,360
Reaction score
6,611
Location
West Cork, Ireland
... And tbh I haven't learnt much at all.

...I thought id finish the course and feel confident and ready to get a job in a salon.

...I plan to go on courses throughout my career, but I don't think I should be leaving a level 3 course with just a piece of paper and next to no knowledge.
I'm gutted and just feel like giving hairdressing up now.
It's not you, it's them!

It's all about properly managing student expectations.

Unfortunately, the college brochures and course info give students unrealistic expectations about being salon ready as a graduate stylist after completing level 3. So unless you've been working in a salon throughout your college training, that option is unrealistic for most level 3 college leavers and that's not because they're poor quality students.

However, all is not lost.

I felt in a similar predicament after my level 3 so I started taking short courses offered by the local wholesalers. They were useful, but still not enough to make me feel confident so I splashed the cash and went to the sassoon academy in London to do the ABC course. :eek:

It was eye opening and totally worth the money for what I learnt there. In fact, I even suggested to another hair pal to consider doing the sassoon instead of level 3.

If I could afford the time and cash to attend a different sassoon course every two years, l'll be a happy bunny. :D
 

byKaty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2014
Messages
888
Reaction score
424
Location
northern ireland
It's not you, it's them!

It's all about properly managing student expectations.

Unfortunately, the college brochures and course info give students unrealistic expectations about being salon ready as a graduate stylist after completing level 3. So unless you've been working in a salon throughout your college training, that option is unrealistic for most level 3 college leavers and that's not because they're poor quality students.

However, all is not lost.

I felt in a similar predicament after my level 3 so I started taking short courses offered by the local wholesalers. They were useful, but still not enough to make me feel confident so I splashed the cash and went to the sassoon academy in London to do the ABC course. :eek:

It was eye opening and totally worth the money for what I learnt there. In fact, I even suggested to another hair pal to consider doing the sassoon instead of level 3.

If I could afford the time and cash to attend a different sassoon course every two years, l'll be a happy bunny. :D
I'm saving the pennies to go on one!! For now I will have to make do with abc cutting dvd.

I've booked 3 wella colour courses and 1 of their new business ones as I have an awesome rep who gets me brill deals!!
Decided this year I would focus on colour. I actually stopped going to my level 3 class as I was bored and unimpressed with the tutors work.
 
J

James294323

Guest
Once you have done your training you just have to go for it an get on the floor. It's the only way you will get the confidence and experience. You can watch as much as you like but you need to jump in and go for it.

After I qualified I took a job with Mark Warner for summer season and worked in a hotel salon ON MY OWN. I was desperate to work overseas and I passed the trade tests. But I had no one to ask anything and was stuck using Redken products and colour which I had never used. It was a steep frightening learning curve and after that summer season I got a job in a local salon back home. My boss knew my experience and was amazing with answering my constant questions and running colours past her before applying on clients.

The point is no one wants you to fail. Especially the salon you are working in. They will know your experience from your interview and trade tests. I'd just be upfront and say you are a little nervous and need a bit of initial hand holding just to run questions past them etc. They may offer you courses with their colour house (I was after 1 year) or you can set that up yourself in time. we have all been there at some point. You will be surprised at how much you know and what you can achieve when presented with the task.

Good luck!
 

AllanJudge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
456
Reaction score
182
Location
Liverpool
Thank you for all the helpful advice (as always)

The course was just bigged up so much at the start, loads of talk not much action.

I'd love to go to Vidal Sassoon, that's something I'd love to do.
Which ABC course did you do with them Haircutz?

Chris you're right. I need to get into a salon cause the longer I leave it the more daunting it gets.

Thanks again.
 

Nicky G

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
81
Reaction score
31
Location
Cheshire
Even if you can force yourself on someone for a day a week voluntary the benefits will be worth it. Good luck x
 

Cole_1304

Active Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2016
Messages
36
Reaction score
10
Location
scotland
... And tbh I haven't learnt much at all.

I thought id finish the course and feel confident and ready to get a job in a salon. I've tweaked my CV loads but what happens when I go for an interview?

I can't choose colours for people, I know the basics of colour theory but that's it. I feel like we haven't done anything advanced.

Everytime I tell my tutors I feel like the course is too basic - I'm told 'we're delivering what is in the curriculum' and I'm told that if I want to learn things like balayage and precision cutting that I'll need to go on little courses to learn these skills.

I plan to go on courses throughout my career, but I don't think I should be leaving a level 3 course with just a piece of paper and next to no knowledge.

I'm gutted and just feel like giving hairdressing up now.
First of all....DON'T GIVE UP!!!

I was trained in college and I also worked as an assistant (or junior) for years before I finished college and qualified. What I will say though is I was in a HNC class with students I had trained from with level 2 up and most of them would never get a job in a salon because college is only there to teach you the basics & YOU do the rest by practicing. I felt for a period of time college was shit & wasn't learning anything but then I realized looking around and listening to all these girls saying it's the lecturers fault they aren't good that you need to take your career into your own hands and do everything you can to learn & soak up every bit of information you can because that's what sets you apart from other people. When I qualified I was terrified but everyone is trust me. You just have to go for it and do the best job you can. You will learn from your mistakes along the way, it is all about trial & error mostly. It doesn't hurt to get on YouTube & check out real hairdressers who share their techniques and formulas, it helps you understand how hairdressing works and that we are not all experts as soon as we get that piece of paper. I still go onto sites like modern salon, tigi education, instagram & youtube to check out new techniques, I am constantly hungry to learn and be the best I can be just.
Use you dolls head and practice if you are scared to mess up on a human. You really need to push yourself or you will give up. Good Luck.
 

Silverclarity

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Location
Cambridgeshire
It's not you, it's them!

It's all about properly managing student expectations.

Unfortunately, the college brochures and course info give students unrealistic expectations about being salon ready as a graduate stylist after completing level 3. So unless you've been working in a salon throughout your college training, that option is unrealistic for most level 3 college leavers and that's not because they're poor quality students.

However, all is not lost.

I felt in a similar predicament after my level 3 so I started taking short courses offered by the local wholesalers. They were useful, but still not enough to make me feel confident so I splashed the cash and went to the sassoon academy in London to do the ABC course. :eek:

It was eye opening and totally worth the money for what I learnt there. In fact, I even suggested to another hair pal to consider doing the sassoon instead of level 3.

If I could afford the time and cash to attend a different sassoon course every two years, l'll be a happy bunny. :D
How much is the ABC course?
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Premium Geek
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
10,360
Reaction score
6,611
Location
West Cork, Ireland

heather1992

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
94
Reaction score
29
Location
Bolton
Why not try level 4? There are 2 different level 4 courses available management and colour correction. I am due to complete the colour correction course in 4 weeks time and I have learnt so much! Also I truly believe practice makes perfect! Get a head block or some hair extensionsand have a play with colours, maybe get a placement in a salon volunteering one day a week to get some experience and watch the other stylists? Don't give up if it's what you really want to do x
 

Kezzzziiii

Active Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2016
Messages
32
Reaction score
1
Location
Stoke
I'm in the same situation, I am due to finish in June and I feel like I've wasted my time and money at college, I learnt more on level 2..
I'm struggling to find anywhere to take me on as a trainee because they all want under 18 and I'm 31.
I wanted to go mobile but I don't feel I know enough, and the extra courses cost a fortune.
I love working with hair but I'm now thinking you need to start this job off when your younger so your able to do an apprenticeship.
 

Latest posts

Top