Course Advice / nsi? / going mobile

itsallnewtome

Member
Hi, I am 39 and have been thinking of learning how to acrylic nails etc for sometime. My children will all (at long last) be at school full time from september. I have never worked in the beauty industry and the only experience I have had with nails is when I have my own done! I have decided to bite the bullet so to speak and have been over to NSI today to find out about the courses they run. I have been advised to do the foundation course - Liquid and powder first. I was then going to look at doing a manicure, pedicure and nail art in the months after (when I can afford it!! A five day course seems to be very short and I just wondered if I was taking the right route and if not should I be looking to go to college? Do anybody have any advice for me.

I had a quick look around the warehouse to get an idea of prices and how much profit there may be going mobile. I obviously have no experience and just wondered if somebody could give me some ideas of whether going mobile is a good idea or not. Do any of you do mobile in Manchester area?

My last question (for now (!!)) is does any think it would be a good idea for me to contact some local salons and ask them for some kind of work experience (at my age they might just laugh at me!). I am just considering my options. They initial layout of cash is going to be a lot of money for me so I need to make sure I take the correct route.

Thank you in advance for any advice.
 

cathill

Member
NSI is a very reputable company however i spent 2 years at college and endless courses after college to train in what im doing. you cant learn anything in 5 days i would recommend you contact your local college see if you can do an evening course get your manicure and pedicure certificate behind you this will teach you not just how to do mans and peds but a whole load of other stuff too the structure of the nails contraindications troubleshooting the list goes on there is a lot to learn i think once you have this skill then you can look at doing a course in gels or acrylics . i have been mobile in the south manchester area now for 12 years it took 2 years and a lot of hard work to build up a decent client base i started off in a salon then i rented in a hairdressers then as my client base got bigger i was able to go mobile a salon wont let you work on anyone untill your qualified but they may let you go in and help out just so you get the feel of the industry i would say dont cut corners where your training is concerned it will cost you in the long run.x good luck.
 

UKRed

Member
I'm looking into doing the same course at NSI, just gotta work out a cheap and easy way of getting there!
 

Bebeautiful

Member
Hi itsallnewtome,
I agree with cathill, you will be far better off doing a professional course eg a beauty course over a space of 2 years becasuse you learn the inns as well as the outs of everything beauty and this allows for your treatments to be vast. I did the BTEC diploma course along with gel and acrylic (as separate courses) and I can offer my clients the full works :lol:.
 

Gilly T

Member
Hi
I have just completed my vtct mani/pedi and my four day course at nsi in l&p. Fifth day is practical assessment day.

I totally agree about the college course first even just in mani and pedi. mine was 18 weeks. It prepares you somuch in terms of filing technique, skin, nail structure, diseases and disorders etc., it has been invaluable to me over the last couple of vweeks.

sorry about mistakes, soaking my right hand off at mo after someone practices rebalance on it today at nsi. :eek:
 

jaynesavage

Member
hi - there is a thread on here somewhere about the NVQ nails- you could do this at your local college, one night a week - this covers man/ped and enhancements. this is a great base to start from. If you haven't done an NVQ before, you should be able to apply to do the course for free.(you have to buy some kit though) Its a great way to meet other like minded people and will give you an idea of areas you need more/extra training in. you could then do a conversion course with what ever system you prefer. you could even do this at the same time, so that in a year you will be more confident to set up for real. (some of the girls on my course got placements as well at salons) You will need lots of practice over the year anyway, and can start building a client base (even if just man/ped) as long as you get some insurance, and as a student you can do this quite cheaply.
there are other NVQ courses like beauty (this is two years I think)
Good Luck
 

itsallnewtome

Member
thank you all for your replies. I have telephoned abraham moss college today and they do a 20 week course onn a friday morning. I would prefer to do something of an evening if I can get it so will keep looking around. I think I may wait until I have done the Manicure and Pedicure course at a college and get some NVQs before doing the NSI course. the only problem is they all seem to be aimed at 18 year olds I have only found the one course so far at Abraham Moss, going to ring Ashton Collage tomorrow and see if they do anything. Thank you again for all your replies:)
 

*Ang*

Member
thank you all for your replies. I have telephoned abraham moss college today and they do a 20 week course onn a friday morning. I would prefer to do something of an evening if I can get it so will keep looking around. I think I may wait until I have done the Manicure and Pedicure course at a college and get some NVQs before doing the NSI course. the only problem is they all seem to be aimed at 18 year olds I have only found the one course so far at Abraham Moss, going to ring Ashton Collage tomorrow and see if they do anything. Thank you again for all your replies:)
I think it is a good idea too to go to college to get your NVQ's. I would have thought the courses would be open to everybody regardless of age though. When I trained at college there was a mixed bag of ages from school leavers right up to ladies of retirement age wanting a change and although the younger ones had a tendancy to mess about we all got along fine. I hope you get sorted on a course soon :)
 

jaynesavage

Member
there were 18 - 50 year olds on my course - I was worried I'd be the oldest at 36, but actually it was a good mix.
Good Luck!
 

UKRed

Member
My course was mixed ages too, there was one 17 year old and the rest were pretty much over 23 - I went to Bolton Community College
 

Gilly T

Member
thank you all for your replies. I have telephoned abraham moss college today and they do a 20 week course onn a friday morning. I would prefer to do something of an evening if I can get it so will keep looking around. I think I may wait until I have done the Manicure and Pedicure course at a college and get some NVQs before doing the NSI course. the only problem is they all seem to be aimed at 18 year olds I have only found the one course so far at Abraham Moss, going to ring Ashton Collage tomorrow and see if they do anything. Thank you again for all your replies:)
I did my 18 week mani/pedi at Tameside college. They have just released their new September dates on the internet. Tameside College Ashton Under Lyne Gtr Manchester England UK

You'll love it x
 

jezzabelle

Member
Hi, I've just finished my VTCT level 2 in manicure and nail technology at Pendleton College in Salford, the course started in September and ran till June it was on a Tuesday evening from 5-8 pm. We did manicures first and then proceeded onto nail enhancements, covering Silk and Fibreglass, Sculptured Acrylics and Tip and overlay acrylics, at the end we did a bit of gel, I really enjoyed the course and feel quite confident doing my own and friends and families nails. There was a varied age range from 17 to mid 50's and everyone got on really well. The Tutor was really helpful.
Depnding on your circumtances you may be able to get help with the course fees but I don't think they help towards all the equipment you need.
 

blossom

Well-Known Member
Hiya

I trained in nails at 37, like you it was when my kids were all in full time schooling, and I have to say it was the best career decision as far as I'm concerned! It fits in perfectly around the family, school hols can be juggled by bullying clients :)lol:) into doing more evening appointments and Saturdays - which I don't normally do, but this lets the kids and I still spend a bit of time together in the hols, also special assemblies, sports days, school plays etc can all be accommodated by crossing out sections in the diary. It really works well for me.

Obviously you wouldn't have the flexibility if you worked in a shop, although it would be a cheaper option. But then you wouldn't reap the full benefit of the prices you charged in a salon situation as the salon would be getting quite a chunk . . . for me I prefer to be my own boss and pay for everything including advertising obviously (of which I had to do more at the beginning than I thought but then if nobody knows about you, they won't come, will they?) but then what people pay me for my services is mine and I like that lol.

I started off mobile but as it got busier and I became more frantic, I decided to work from home and it made so much difference. My stress levels dropped instantly. In fact, so long as you have a place to work at home (I don't have a separate room, I work from my living room) I can't see any drawbacks with working from home.

But I can see plenty with mobile lol! Shall I list a few . . .

Obviously, cost of car & petrol.
Hassle getting stuff in and out of car and setting up & down.
Often not being able to park all that near the house.
Clients answering phones at home, having kids on their lap (who try to fiddle with your stuff) letting dogs in and out, helping elderly relatives, putting dinner on (I ask you!):rolleyes:
Interruptions from neighbours, postmen, delivery men.
Spending ages deciding where you're going to work - ie near a power point for your worklight/gel lamp and general faffing.
Entire families watching the entire process (yes honestly) :!:
As you get busier, if you do forget something and have to go back home for it this will throw out your entire schedule and give you blood pressure (and I only worked a mile radius of my house at the time).
Arriving and being told to set up by hubby/whoever while the client finishes her dinner/aerobic class/watching Eastenders and being left there for 15 minutes.
Someone blocking your car in so you have to find them and ask them to move it, thus making you late for your next appointment.
Obviously you need to allocate more time per client because of the driving time and setting up and down.
Turning out in the cold/dark/rain.

I'm sure there's more but I doubt anyones still reading lol

(sorry all you lovely mobile peeps who love it, this is just my experience lol)

If you do go mobile please don't make the mistake of charging less than salons do. These clients have the privelege of staying in the comfort of their own homes PLUS they don't have to smudge their nails driving home, absolute zero inconvenience for them . . . just make sure you charge them enough for it!

Good luck whatever you choose! :hug::hug:
 

cathill

Member
I do work mobile and i always charge slightly less than the salons it keeps my clients coming even though they still probably would cause they like my work but also your in thier home using thier water /electric /towels i would never work from home as i need to seperate the 2 once work is done thats it my home is exactly that.The only overheads with mobile work is car and petrol well you can claim that back anyway! as for lugging everything round well i guess if you were doing massage and facials its a hassle i stopped doing that as carrying the couch and a big steamer around just wasnt working but my nail box spray tan machine and waxing kit brings me no hassles what so ever.
 

femmefan

Member
I work mobile AND home salon. I do prefer working at home (I converted my dining room to a salon) and always offer this option first as it's a far more relaxing atmosphere. However, I do travel to clients who prefer it.

If you have school age children you need to think about what will happen during school holidays. Will you always have childcare to enable you to do mobile? I always explain to clients that during school holidays it will not always be possible to come to them, but they can come to me because I can still keep one eye on the kids (at least to know they're not killing each other :lol:)

All the best
Hazel
 

ValencianNails

Positivity rules!
you cant learn anything in 5 days

I would say don't cut corners where your training is concerned it will cost you in the long run.
That must be why the 5 day foundation courses that the top nail companies offer are so popular and, with ongoing education, produce some of the best technicians in the world?!

Intensive 5 day (nails only) courses are IMO the best way to train. Not only do you get a better tutor to student ratio but more importantly the education and training is completely up to date and not out of the ark (as we hear about all too often regarding some college nail courses).
 
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