Cruelty-free?

#1
Does here anybody know how to check whether a product is cruelty-free or not?Or how can we convince or show evidence to customers that our products ( I mean gel polish) is cruelty-free or not? Thank you.
 

Anna Ljungberg

Well-Known Member
#2
Best bet would be to contact the brand or supplier for this information.
 

#3
Best bet would be to contact the brand or supplier for this information.
Thank you. But what if for customers themsevles? Should they ask brand for proof when they try new polish? There should be something for one to check in general?
 

Susansay

New Member
#4
Thank you. But what if for customers themsevles? Should they ask brand for proof when they try new polish? There should be something for one to check in general?
Thank you. But what if for customers themsevles? Should they ask brand for proof when they try new polish? There should be something for one to check in general?
Hi, do you know that rabbit logo? I mean the logo for cruelty-free. For brands which boast cruelty-free, they will probably show the logo.
 

Susansay

New Member
#5
Best bet would be to contact the brand or supplier for this information.
Agree. For wholesalers or others, asking them directly should be the directest way.
 

Anna Ljungberg

Well-Known Member
#6
Thank you. But what if for customers themsevles? Should they ask brand for proof when they try new polish? There should be something for one to check in general?
If it's a client of yours simply ask your supplier on their behalf. :)
 

#7

#8
Hi, do you know that rabbit logo? I mean the logo for cruelty-free. For brands which boast cruelty-free, they will probably show the logo.
Hi, yes, I found this logo in the internet. But actually I found many versions of rabbits, some of pink, some are black, and they are in different designs. Can all of them be trusted?
 

inspia

Active Member
#9
You want to go with a well known reputable brand, beware of China as they require animal testing. You will need to read up to see how this affects brands imported etc.
Also just because the finished product isn’t tested doesn’t mean the individual ingredients aren’t it’s a bit of a minefield. Stick to EU brands as we have stringent heath testing.
Animal friendly brands shout it from the rooftops, if it’s not obvious or stated there may be a reason why.

You need to google the bunnies so you know what to look for.
 

Susansay

New Member
#10
You want to go with a well known reputable brand, beware of China as they require animal testing. You will need to read up to see how this affects brands imported etc.
Also just because the finished product isn’t tested doesn’t mean the individual ingredients aren’t it’s a bit of a minefield. Stick to EU brands as we have stringent heath testing.
Animal friendly brands shout it from the rooftops, if it’s not obvious or stated there may be a reason why.

You need to google the bunnies so you know what to look for.
Hi, isn't that China has expanded range for cosmetics that don't need to test on animals? Products for hair dye or sunscreen still need to test on animals, but for gel polish, it seems that it is not in that range that needs testing? It is said that on China's Animal Testing Laws, "for domestically produced ordinary cosmetics, animal testing is no longer an absolute requirement." And that cosmetics products include nail care products right?
 

Susansay

New Member
#11
Hi, yes, I found this logo in the internet. But actually I found many versions of rabbits, some of pink, some are black, and they are in different designs. Can all of them be trusted?
Hi, actually there are three verified ones. Three bunny logos, one is verified by PETA, one is by Leaping Bunny, and the last one is Choose Cruelty Free. They are recognized by the public but of different standards. Anyway, they can be trusted but it is better for u to check which one you prefer.
 

#12
You could also check out the leaping bunny which list cruelty-free brands on their website as someone else has mentioned.
 

#13
Hi, isn't that China has expanded range for cosmetics that don't need to test on animals? Products for hair dye or sunscreen still need to test on animals, but for gel polish, it seems that it is not in that range that needs testing? It is said that on China's Animal Testing Laws, "for domestically produced ordinary cosmetics, animal testing is no longer an absolute requirement." And that cosmetics products include nail care products right?
What you have to consider here is that there isn't an outright ban, it's just an option. Old habits die hard and if China are selling to less enlightened nations that still prefer to have product testing on animals then there will most likely be continuation of the practice.

A few years ago I used to do a lot of work with Chinese producers of all kinds of things from toys and clothes to tools and electrical goods...I would sample a product and provide feedback.
My feeling was that China, having emerged from a relatively recent period of oppression, have embraced the world of production and commerce in a manner akin to a child with ADHD.

Competitive and innovative, but here's the snag, regulation on the quality and safety of products produced hasn't progressed at the same frenetic rate. There is little in place beyond the competition itself to drive this. Sometimes it works fine. If the camera tripod by X is stronger and more sturdy than the tripod from Y it's pretty easy to see. It becomes a problem with things you can't see... like with cosmetics.

If the competition is to have the most colours and effects, the longest lasting or the glossiest gel top coat then that will override less obvious benefits, such as the safety or provenance of the ingredients. Add to that the price competition and the issue is compounded, quality ingredients aren't cheap. The cheaper, lower quality options will likely come from sources that will still embrace animal testing simply because at the moment it's the least expensive option for them.I

I think the day will come when this will improve but for now it's easier to deal with the issue by being less than open about production methods and hoping to get away with it.
I warned a friend not to use the new gel remover recently and she came back to me with the ingredients list which made the product look practically organic and very safe. The ammonia and caustic soda were listed in a generic way to make them appear to be natural, harmless ingredients!
Under all these circumstances I personally would not even trust MSDS data at this time. There just isn't the regulation in place to give it authenticity.
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
#14
That is an outstanding post Alison!
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
#15
Leaping Bunny has certified one brand that sources gel polish from China. As Susansay said "China's Animal Testing Laws, "for domestically produced ordinary cosmetics, animal testing is no longer an absolute requirement." - the key term here is absolute. This means that any company there can be asked to test on animals. If they have or not is impossible to prove.

I queried this with Leaping Bunny as we were considering to apply as well. But never received a reply.
 

Susansay

New Member
#16
What Inspia said is right, it's better for you to google the news of your product ( if it is not your own brand). As what we have mentioned before, in China, for domestically produced ordinary cosmetics, animal testing is not the absolute requirement. For instance, like Nudestix makeup, as it wanted to be cruelty-free and to enter China's market as well, it adopted the strategy to produce its products in China and avoided animal testing. Just like what Inspia said before, for brand which boasts cruelty-free, they will definitely shout it from the rooftops. And you can see whether that product is really cruelty-free if that products enter markets like China too.

From what Alison said before, we know the circumstances is not that good. But to stick to the theme, I think that three bunny logos still works. Though the reality is not that reliable, getting something to prove is better than nothing. Three of them will verify whether the products and ingredients are tested on animals or not. Please note that some of them make audit and re-accreditation and some is not. These are very basic logos to prove cruelty-free. Applying for one of them will never be bad.
 

#17
What Inspia said is right, it's better for you to google the news of your product ( if it is not your own brand). As what we have mentioned before, in China, for domestically produced ordinary cosmetics, animal testing is not the absolute requirement. For instance, like Nudestix makeup, as it wanted to be cruelty-free and to enter China's market as well, it adopted the strategy to produce its products in China and avoided animal testing. Just like what Inspia said before, for brand which boasts cruelty-free, they will definitely shout it from the rooftops. And you can see whether that product is really cruelty-free if that products enter markets like China too.

From what Alison said before, we know the circumstances is not that good. But to stick to the theme, I think that three bunny logos still works. Though the reality is not that reliable, getting something to prove is better than nothing. Three of them will verify whether the products and ingredients are tested on animals or not. Please note that some of them make audit and re-accreditation and some is not. These are very basic logos to prove cruelty-free. Applying for one of them will never be bad.
Thank you. It is helpful for me.
 

#18
What you have to consider here is that there isn't an outright ban, it's just an option. Old habits die hard and if China are selling to less enlightened nations that still prefer to have product testing on animals then there will most likely be continuation of the practice.

A few years ago I used to do a lot of work with Chinese producers of all kinds of things from toys and clothes to tools and electrical goods...I would sample a product and provide feedback.
My feeling was that China, having emerged from a relatively recent period of oppression, have embraced the world of production and commerce in a manner akin to a child with ADHD.

Competitive and innovative, but here's the snag, regulation on the quality and safety of products produced hasn't progressed at the same frenetic rate. There is little in place beyond the competition itself to drive this. Sometimes it works fine. If the camera tripod by X is stronger and more sturdy than the tripod from Y it's pretty easy to see. It becomes a problem with things you can't see... like with cosmetics.

If the competition is to have the most colours and effects, the longest lasting or the glossiest gel top coat then that will override less obvious benefits, such as the safety or provenance of the ingredients. Add to that the price competition and the issue is compounded, quality ingredients aren't cheap. The cheaper, lower quality options will likely come from sources that will still embrace animal testing simply because at the moment it's the least expensive option for them.I

I think the day will come when this will improve but for now it's easier to deal with the issue by being less than open about production methods and hoping to get away with it.
I warned a friend not to use the new gel remover recently and she came back to me with the ingredients list which made the product look practically organic and very safe. The ammonia and caustic soda were listed in a generic way to make them appear to be natural, harmless ingredients!
Under all these circumstances I personally would not even trust MSDS data at this time. There just isn't the regulation in place to give it authenticity.
Thank you for you post.
 

#19

#20
You want to go with a well known reputable brand, beware of China as they require animal testing. You will need to read up to see how this affects brands imported etc.
Also just because the finished product isn’t tested doesn’t mean the individual ingredients aren’t it’s a bit of a minefield. Stick to EU brands as we have stringent heath testing.
Animal friendly brands shout it from the rooftops, if it’s not obvious or stated there may be a reason why.

You need to google the bunnies so you know what to look for.
Agree. Thank you. This works for me.
 
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