Cuticle on bitten nails?

#1
Hi,

Can anyone give me some advise on a new client that has lots of cuticle on her bitten nails. I pushed it back using cuticle away but am hesitant to clip all but the loose bits as I am bit nervous of hurting her. She has rebooked for another Shellac manicure in a fortnight and I would like to be more confident on how to deal with it.

Thanks
 
#2
Keep gently pushing back overgrown cuticle as you have been doing using your cuticle away then deactivating with soap and water, then once you have applied shellac use cuticle eraser and solar oil to help nourish the cuticle and keep it soft.

Advise the client to massage in solar oil to or three times a day between treatments telling her that the process of natural sloughing of the skin cells over time and the nourishing action of the oil with massage will help her cuticles to shrink back and remain soft.

You are wise not to cut, cutting leads to more growth and potential injury. A line I always use with my clients when they I ask why I don't trim cuticle is that trimming leads to overgrowth of cuticle which is why nail bitters tend to have overgrown cuticles as they are always nibbling.

The only time I would trim is loose skin to prevent snagging, but very very rarely

Works for me & HTH

Good luck x
 

Wee Fee

Active Member
#3
Hi,

Can anyone give me some advise on a new client that has lots of cuticle on her bitten nails. I pushed it back using cuticle away but am hesitant to clip all but the loose bits as I am bit nervous of hurting her. She has rebooked for another Shellac manicure in a fortnight and I would like to be more confident on how to deal with it.

Thanks
You are right to be cautious with nippers, but nail biters do tend to have a lot of non living tissue on the nail plate that looks messy, gets in the way of a nice tidy applications and if we loosen it from the nail plate but don't fully remove it we leave them with loads to pick and bite, delaying their recovery from the addiction of finger biting.

Without seeing the nails in question it's hard to advice exactly what to do but this is my usual way of approaching cuticle work on a bad nail/skin biter;

- Apply a good dose of CND Cuticle Away, use an implement to spread it across the entire nail plate and give it a little longer than usual to do it's job.
- Dab excess Cuticle Away off with a dry pad from the first nail and proceed to lift and loosing the softened non-living cuticle tissue from the nail plate with a 'chisel' shaped metal implement. Then use a probe or curette to get closer into the side walls and along the eponychium. There will be tons of cuticle skin hanging on down at the eponychium, don't nip it yet.
- Do the same with each nail in turn, one at a time.
- Spray with water and give each nail a good rub with a cloth towel, this will deactivate and rinse away the cuticle away, but the rubbing will also be exfoliating off a good bit of that non-living skin that's hanging around at the eponychium, giving you much less to potentially nip - good news!
- Now that the nail are clean and dry it's much easier to see exactly what you need to nip. Take your time and just nip, don't tug at loose 'flappy' bits of non-living skin.

Give yourself a little extra time in the appointment for this. Take your time, you will get more confident every time you do it.
Good luck!
 
Last edited:

Wee Fee

Active Member
#4
Advise the client to massage in solar oil to or three times a day between treatments telling her that the process of natural sloughing of the skin cells over time and the nourishing action of the oil with massage will help her cuticles to shrink back and remain soft.
Exactly! :)
 
#5
Just what I needed to read think I did ok now. Thanks so much for the replies :)
 

Dnx

Member
#6
One of my clients last week had a
overgrown eponychiums and was a nail biter. I explained that I would gently push them back and that some of the loose dead skin would probably come away when drying off the soapy water after CA whilst rubbing, however, I wouldn't be cutting them. I told her that if she used her SolarOil MNN (morning noon night) it would help them to recede and that it would be something we work on over time. I told her that we don't cut living tissue and that doing so would cause them to grow back aggressively.

Saw a similar case on Doug Schoon's Facebook page.
 

nailzoo

Well-Known Member
#7
Sometimes you have to cut, but you have to know the difference between dead and live, I moisturise, then dehydrate, then it makes it quite obvious what is dead and what is live ..... BUT, you have to have good eyes and a steady hand, if you don't .... don't do it at all, I couldn't possible leave all that overhanging dead skin ...
Natural Nail Transformation Full Video - YouTube
 
Top