Hairdressing in residential care homes

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Manddi

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New to salon geek been mobile for 20 + years doing mainly residential & nursing homes can anyone give me any information as to when when Hairdresses are allowed into nursing homes And if anyone is back doing hair In homes what adjustments you have made to keep everyone safe
 

Enchanting Beauty

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Hi! I’m not a hairdresser but saw on the news yesterday that families want care homes opened up again as even family can’t go in still. It sounded as if that is going to be quite a way off yet so I would doubt hairdressers would be let in yet.
Also, no one in hair or beauty should be working at the moment.
 

Mhhair

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Hi I’m new to salon geek & wondered if you could give me your view on this .
I’m a mobile hairdresser & also have agreed to work in a residential home 1 day a week . My question is , is it normal for the home to say I need to invoice the family member who controls the residents money for payment of hair service , after I’ve done their hair !
It seems the home doesn’t want to be involved other than forwarding my invoice then I will have to wait for payment from family member.
As & when they feel I suppose.
Just wondering if that is the norm ?
It seems some have their own money & pay at the time .
Thank you if you can help
 

TheDuchess

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I don’t have any experience of this I’m afraid, however I am on the Board of a small care home.

I’d advise you to establish who your customer is. You might prefer to just ask the staff at the Home what is required, and get them to settle up, but this is not respectful to family wishes and concerns. It may be that some of the residents don’t have enough independence of mind to decide what they want and their family may be the ones making all the decisions. In this situation, you cannot contract your services with the resident, or the home, it’s unethical. The family may be the ones specifying the service and you may have to negotiate with them if you think that’s going to be tricky - for instance some services may be too long for disoriented residents. It sounds disrespectful, but it’s a bit like having a dog grooming parlour, you take the wishes of the paying customer into account but you always put the welfare of the one receiving the service to the fore. If another party got involved with the service you’d feel anxious that there’d be a miscommunication somewhere along the line.

I suggest that you set up agreements direct with the families, agree what services they wish for their loved one and yes, send them an invoice. It needn’t be onerous. You send out a monthly invoice to each family, with reminders. Make it easy to pay - give your bank details and a reference number so they can pay by bank transfer. You can be clear that you won’t do services on residents that haven’t had outstanding bills settled. Maybe look into a direct debit or standing order arrangement.

It’s actually a fantastic opportunity to have a regular income - if you’re sick, you just reschedule your day direct with the home, you won’t lose any business.

You could ask the home what would happen about unsettled invoices and see if they have a resident fund that could be used if you feel very anxious. Bear in mind that if they pay you for your services, and agree a regular day for your visit, and start specifying what you do for a resident, they may potentially be creating an employer employee relationship.

Lots of very ordinary services work on an invoice basis, my window cleaner and lawn mowing chap leave me invoices rather than expect cash in an envelope. I expect the Home has a similar arrangement with visiting chiropodists other allied health professionals. It’s their normal way of doing business.
 

Mhhair

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I don’t have any experience of this I’m afraid, however I am on the Board of a small care home.

I’d advise you to establish who your customer is. You might prefer to just ask the staff at the Home what is required, and get them to settle up, but this is not respectful to family wishes and concerns. It may be that some of the residents don’t have enough independence of mind to decide what they want and their family may be the ones making all the decisions. In this situation, you cannot contract your services with the resident, or the home, it’s unethical. The family may be the ones specifying the service and you may have to negotiate with them if you think that’s going to be tricky - for instance some services may be too long for disoriented residents. It sounds disrespectful, but it’s a bit like having a dog grooming parlour, you take the wishes of the paying customer into account but you always put the welfare of the one receiving the service to the fore. If another party got involved with the service you’d feel anxious that there’d be a miscommunication somewhere along the line.

I suggest that you set up agreements direct with the families, agree what services they wish for their loved one and yes, send them an invoice. It needn’t be onerous. You send out a monthly invoice to each family, with reminders. Make it easy to pay - give your bank details and a reference number so they can pay by bank transfer. You can be clear that you won’t do services on residents that haven’t had outstanding bills settled. Maybe look into a direct debit or standing order arrangement.

It’s actually a fantastic opportunity to have a regular income - if you’re sick, you just reschedule your day direct with the home, you won’t lose any business.

You could ask the home what would happen about unsettled invoices and see if they have a resident fund that could be used if you feel very anxious. Bear in mind that if they pay you for your services, and agree a regular day for your visit, and start specifying what you do for a resident, they may potentially be creating an employer employee relationship.

Lots of very ordinary services work on an invoice basis, my window cleaner and lawn mowing chap leave me invoices rather than expect cash in an envelope. I expect the Home has a similar arrangement with visiting chiropodists other allied health professionals. It’s their normal way of doing business.
Thank you for your response.
The bit I’m uneasy about is I’m expected to do their hair first , send the invoice to the home then they forward that invoice on to the residents family with my paying details, then I wait for payment.
I have said payment on receiving email , had one pay , nothing from others as yet been 5 days .
Some of the residents have their own money or within the care home , But there’s a few the families have control . Just felt the home gave the impression it’s not our problem if they don’t pay as we have forwarded your invoice.
I think they should be asking for permission from family first .
See how if goes
Thanks again
 

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