High employee turnover?

#1
Hi all,
I’m newly qualified and I’ve started applying for job vacancy’s.

I’m just wondering what is deemed as high employee turnover?

There is a salon where they always seem to have therapists leaving (10 in the past year) should this be ringing alarm bells?

Another salon always seems to be advertising for therapists even though it’s a relatively small salon

I just don’t want to start somewhere I will begin to hate and then it affect my love of the job ‍♀️

What should I be looking for please?
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#2
Even the most downmarket poorly managed Salon can offer useful learning opportunities, so I wouldn’t necessarily dismiss them out of hand. I think when you’re starting your career, it’s handy to gain experience from a variety of situations because that helps you work out your own boundaries and standards. It might be that the owner is struggling to recruit staff of the right calibre and that the staff who leave aren’t interested in working to very high standards or permanently want every other Saturday off? I’d probably ask the question at interview and see what the owner/manager has to say.

You can always decide to give somewhere 6 months and then move on, only choosing to stay on if you still enjoying working there and feel valued.
 

#3
That’s a very interesting way to look at it! And a valid point.
I will see what the interview brings
 

House Beauty

Well-Known Member
#4
That’s a very interesting way to look at it! And a valid point.
I will see what the interview brings
Ask them why in the interview and their reaction will probably be all you need to hear/see to decide if the job is right for you.
 

riva

Active Member
#5
Feel strongly about adding my 2 cents here.... I've struggled to keep staff- mostly reception - for quite awhile. On the other hand, my beauty staff do ok and back of house or other stay extra and work because of love for the job. So I didn't think it was the job per se. I always do exit interviews and have good HR and team building. We take the trouble to invest in staff.
Yet we still lose staff. Your question has come at an interesting point when some new employees separately came up to me to tell me that they were being made to feel uncomfortable by a manager who keeps complaining (never to my face) and putting the place down; one of my oldest employee actually heads it and has been very negative, not just about people who work there but even things like the cost of our treatments (slightly higher necessarily so to account for central London rents), the 'fact' that there are no benefits (all treatments, taken during company time and cost price; not discounted as I don't want to make money from staff; all products cost price; we are very niche in some of the non-beauty things we do which would cost them 100s) etc etc. Basically no real reason and to my face she always tells me how much she loves the job and has stayed for a long time, has been given 2 pay rise (in 18 months) and we take lots of effort in training. Excuse the rant a bit as I'm very angry about this as I put so much effort in.

So I agree with House Beauty - see what they say. I tend to be honest because I'm so passionate about my business.

So what's my current plan? Asking the rest of the team to vote with their feet - just say that they not comfortable being part of the conversation and walk away. I will be pulling them aside and one will be given a warning. The other I'm afraid has to leave as work performance is also poor.

Hope that helps from another perspective.
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#6
Your question has come at an interesting point when some new employees separately came up to me to tell me that they were being made to feel uncomfortable by a manager who keeps complaining (never to my face) and putting the place down; one of my oldest employee actually heads it and has been very negative.
That’s a tricky situation. How do you plan to deal with the manager?
 

#7
Feel strongly about adding my 2 cents here.... I've struggled to keep staff- mostly reception - for quite awhile. On the other hand, my beauty staff do ok and back of house or other stay extra and work because of love for the job. So I didn't think it was the job per se. I always do exit interviews and have good HR and team building. We take the trouble to invest in staff.
Yet we still lose staff. Your question has come at an interesting point when some new employees separately came up to me to tell me that they were being made to feel uncomfortable by a manager who keeps complaining (never to my face) and putting the place down; one of my oldest employee actually heads it and has been very negative, not just about people who work there but even things like the cost of our treatments (slightly higher necessarily so to account for central London rents), the 'fact' that there are no benefits (all treatments, taken during company time and cost price; not discounted as I don't want to make money from staff; all products cost price; we are very niche in some of the non-beauty things we do which would cost them 100s) etc etc. Basically no real reason and to my face she always tells me how much she loves the job and has stayed for a long time, has been given 2 pay rise (in 18 months) and we take lots of effort in training. Excuse the rant a bit as I'm very angry about this as I put so much effort in.

So I agree with House Beauty - see what they say. I tend to be honest because I'm so passionate about my business.

So what's my current plan? Asking the rest of the team to vote with their feet - just say that they not comfortable being part of the conversation and walk away. I will be pulling them aside and one will be given a warning. The other I'm afraid has to leave as work performance is also poor.

Hope that helps from another perspective.
That’s really interesting and I value that input so thank you
 
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