How to manage an 18 year old assistant effectively?

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#1
Hey all I hope you are all having a good January.

Ok so I'll keep this as brief as poss.

Im pretty new to management do don't know everything there is to know, however I have some experience before I opened my own and I'm particularly fair. 3 of my staff are fine to manage (usual issues still happen)
My management style: I compliment them everytime they do well/ complete a task above and beyond, this includes creative work too. All staff are valued and I tell them if there's an issue straight away and we work to resolve it with regular meetings and appraisals.

The issue I have with my assistant is the following.
When I give her any kind of negative feedback (sometimes even if it's just a change) she stares right through me, and folds her arms!....much like a stroppy teenager (this particularly annoys me as I find it extremely rude) It's like she's not taking it in and has a major attitude/mood all day, sometimes more afterwards.

She lies to get herself out of trouble even when I have CCTV or proof she denies all knowledge.

For example, She was late 3 times in a row, I asked - she denied. I then showed her the key fob times she entered the shop. She just looked right through me!
She was spending 10-15 mins in the loop each time she went. Everyday.
So I timed her one day it was 41 minutes!!
She was texting her boyfriend, I asked her outright twice which she denied.

Then as a stroke of luck she ran out of the loo to answer the phone (I was next to the door & she never noticed) and I looked inside, her phone was still in use texting her boyfriend.
I have since confiscated everyone's phones and said if you act like children I'll treat you like it, which I know was wrong to punish the others but she just kept denying it to my face!... She was in a mood for a week

I have now caught her letting her friend in while she opened up for two days (I was in hospital)
Which is a security issue!

However she will deny it. Shall I ask her outright and then show her CCTV ?

I'm struggling to handle this one, given her age is it a bit of nurturing in this case ?

Given all of this she has so many fantastic qualities ...customers love her, she's mature in other ways, and has a the ability to be a fantastic hairdresser.

Help she's sending me crackers!
 

VLoraso

New Member
#2
Personally I would be trying to push her out !

what eles can she lie about ! even when she knows you know the truth ? you'd never be able trust her, id ask her out right and then show her the CCTV and say why have you lied and for that you give her a warning written or verbal and say how its unacceptable to act in a way while you weren't there and also to lie !

may seem harsh but need nip it in the bud before other see and start acting in a way ! ive learned some great to be hairdresser's can make your management side 100x harder because of their attitude and personally its not worth it ! she just sounds very immature and personally I cannot be dealing with people who don't have repect to tell the truth !

when you run a business it is your baby and no one will treat it like you do but how they treat you is how what they think of your business - best thing anyone has ever told me !

hope you figure it out ! sometimes you need be strict to change their attitudes and if they don't well you don't want that stress

Vikki
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#3
Personally I would be trying to push her out !

what eles can she lie about ! even when she knows you know the truth ? you'd never be able trust her, id ask her out right and then show her the CCTV and say why have you lied and for that you give her a warning written or verbal and say how its unacceptable to act in a way while you weren't there and also to lie !

may seem harsh but need nip it in the bud before other see and start acting in a way ! ive learned some great to be hairdresser's can make your management side 100x harder because of their attitude and personally its not worth it ! she just sounds very immature and personally I cannot be dealing with people who don't have repect to tell the truth !

when you run a business it is your baby and no one will treat it like you do but how they treat you is how what they think of your business - best thing anyone has ever told me !

hope you figure it out ! sometimes you need be strict to change their attitudes and if they don't well you don't want that stress

Vikki
Wow love that analogy! I've never thought of it like that! X
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#4
Agree with above.
Start the disciplinary process but if she’s within her probationary period, ( less than 2 years f/t), then she has to go immediately. To my mind, it’s irrelevant what other good qualities she has, lying to your face shows her base unreliable character.

...When I give her any kind of negative feedback (sometimes even if it's just a change) she stares right through me, and folds her arms!....much like a stroppy teenager...
The first time she did this, I would have stopped talking, looked hard at her and told her then that unless she changed her attitude immediately, she would be out of here and was that what she wanted? Be tough and show you mean business!

Nurturing staff is about developing their (hairdressing) skills and creative talents. It’s not about trying to change their fundamental personality type. You appoint staff based on them having the right skill set and personality traits needed for that particular role. Obviously, an interview and trade test isn’t really enough to go on, so that’s why you give them a short probationary period to ensure they will fit into your existing team. For instance, if you already have one extreme lively personality, don’t appoint someone else who displays those traits because they’ll always be at loggerheads vying for attention, creating a divisive atmosphere. Best to find a mix of staff who will complement one another.

Also, please don’t ever ‘punish’ your other staff for the mistakes of one bad apple. That’s treating them like young children rather than adults and will immediately undo any goodwill you had previously built up with them. Always deal immediately with any issue as it arises and only involve the perpetrator, focusing on specifics.

Your good staff will respect you for not being a pushover.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#5
Agree with above.
Start the disciplinary process but if she’s within her probationary period, ( less than 2 years f/t), then she has to go immediately. To my mind, it’s irrelevant what other good qualities she has, lying to your face shows her base unreliable character.



The first time she did this, I would have stopped talking, looked hard at her and told her then that unless she changed her attitude immediately, she would be out of here and was that what she wanted? Be tough and show you mean business!

Nurturing staff is about developing their (hairdressing) skills and creative talents. It’s not about trying to change their fundamental personality type. You appoint staff based on them having the right skill set and personality traits needed for that particular role. Obviously, an interview and trade test isn’t really enough to go on, so that’s why you give them a short probationary period to ensure they will fit into your existing team. For instance, if you already have one extreme lively personality, don’t appoint someone else who displays those traits because they’ll always be at loggerheads vying for attention, creating a divisive atmosphere. Best to find a mix of staff who will complement one another.

Also, please don’t ever ‘punish’ your other staff for the mistakes of one bad apple. That’s treating them like young children rather than adults and will immediately undo any goodwill you had previously built up with them. Always deal immediately with any issue as it arises and only involve the perpetrator, focusing on specifics.

Your good staff will respect you for not being a pushover.
Thank you....


She was fine for the first 3 months. Then her attitude started when she started seeing a new guy (who is terrible news).

I didn't act in December as I genuinely couldn't afford to lose her.

Ok I'll start the process immediately. X
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#6
Agree with above.
Start the disciplinary process but if she’s within her probationary period, ( less than 2 years f/t), then she has to go immediately. To my mind, it’s irrelevant what other good qualities she has, lying to your face shows her base unreliable character.



The first time she did this, I would have stopped talking, looked hard at her and told her then that unless she changed her attitude immediately, she would be out of here and was that what she wanted? Be tough and show you mean business!

Nurturing staff is about developing their (hairdressing) skills and creative talents. It’s not about trying to change their fundamental personality type. You appoint staff based on them having the right skill set and personality traits needed for that particular role. Obviously, an interview and trade test isn’t really enough to go on, so that’s why you give them a short probationary period to ensure they will fit into your existing team. For instance, if you already have one extreme lively personality, don’t appoint someone else who displays those traits because they’ll always be at loggerheads vying for attention, creating a divisive atmosphere. Best to find a mix of staff who will complement one another.

Also, please don’t ever ‘punish’ your other staff for the mistakes of one bad apple. That’s treating them like young children rather than adults and will immediately undo any goodwill you had previously built up with them. Always deal immediately with any issue as it arises and only involve the perpetrator, focusing on specifics.

Your good staff will respect you for not being a pushover.
Thank you....


She was fine for the first 3 months. Then her attitude started when she started seeing a new guy (who is terrible news).

I didn't act in December as I genuinely couldn't afford to lose her.

Ok I'll start the process immediately. X
 

#7
I would not be giving an assistant the key to a salon!! On top of many other issues I always found as an assistant I certainly was not paid in line with the responsibility of being a key holder. This is a big ask of someone.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#8
I would not be giving an assistant the key to a salon!! On top of many other issues I always found as an assistant I certainly was not paid in line with the responsibility of being a key holder. This is a big ask of someone.
She isn't a key holder. I was in hospital I had no other choice, my priority was not losing my baby.
She was to open the shop and there was a gap of 30 mins before my beautician could get there after the school run.


Do you have advise ?
 
Last edited:

#9
That was advice....
I completely understand that sometimes things like that happen and absolutely no question that your baby is of course your priority. Just open salon 30 mins later when your beautician arrives. It’s still a big ask of a trainee.
If she has become that untrustworthy I would certainly start disciplinary action though.
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#10
That was advice....
I completely understand that sometimes things like that happen and absolutely no question that your baby is of course your priority. Just open salon 30 mins later when your beautician arrives. It’s still a big ask of a trainee.
I strongly disagree.
As a one-off, it’s an excellent learning opportunity for a trainee/junior member of staff.
After all, the idea is that you are training your staff up to learn various aspects of the salon business to enable them to move into a higher position within the salon structure.

A good trainee/junior will use opportunities like this to demonstrate their trustworthiness and become a great asset to the business. It’s also something they can mention when applying for jobs elsewhere, after completing their training.

If you are actively training someone, you have to give them a chance to shine. Assuming she had completed the task well, I’d have given her an extra half day off or similar to show appreciation.

If I’d been that trainee, I would have done my best to impress the boss with how well I’d managed and be actively looking for opportunities to prove my worth, wouldn’t you?
 

Cesar

www.versum.com
#11
Have you considered introducing commissions? Less hourly pay, more profits from sales - that way, if she isn't making money, shes the only one to blame. Plus, that kind of constant lying should be discussed. We've had a similar situation where one of our stylists, was caught red-handed, leaving the salon early and even stealing some of our products. After the owner spoke with her and mentioned that she should find another business to work it, everything changed - now she's great to work with. A little scare tactic never hurts!
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#12
Have you considered introducing commissions? Less hourly pay, more profits from sales - that way, if she isn't making money, shes the only one to blame. Plus, that kind of constant lying should be discussed. We've had a similar situation where one of our stylists, was caught red-handed, leaving the salon early and even stealing some of our products. After the owner spoke with her and mentioned that she should find another business to work it, everything changed - now she's great to work with. A little scare tactic never hurts!
She is an apprentice so I wouldn't feel comfortable giving her less pay than that, and she's already on commission for products but doesn't sell any! X
 

BannerPenguin

Well-Known Member
#13
Honestly, I would've sacked her. Plenty of people would relish the opportunity you're giving her. Letting her friend in was gross misconduct and I'd be letting her go for that. Would have voided your insurance and all sorts.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#14
Honestly, I would've sacked her. Plenty of people would relish the opportunity you're giving her. Letting her friend in was gross misconduct and I'd be letting her go for that. Would have voided your insurance and all sorts.
Thing is she can't even lie to get out of it my friend owns the salon her friend is an assistant in. And she was saying "please don't tell her boss we will get into trouble"

I think she thinks I was born yday! Grrrrr
 

TheDuchess

Well-Known Member
#15
Haircutz, I worship at your feet. Such clear direction.

Redlottie - sorry Hun, you need get rid asap, but unfortunately apprentices have totally different rights. You can't always sack them. You need to speak to your trainer about the attitude issues and go through a formal process. You must have a paper trail to protect yourself. You also can't deduct from her wages, but you can tell her that she has to make up time.

I had similar issues last year so I totally feel for your situation.
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#16

daydreams01

Well-Known Member
#17
I strongly disagree.
As a one-off, it’s an excellent learning opportunity for a trainee/junior member of staff.
After all, the idea is that you are training your staff up to learn various aspects of the salon business to enable them to move into a higher position within the salon structure.

A good trainee/junior will use opportunities like this to demonstrate their trustworthiness and become a great asset to the business. It’s also something they can mention when applying for jobs elsewhere, after completing their training.

If you are actively training someone, you have to give them a chance to shine. Assuming she had completed the task well, I’d have given her an extra half day off or similar to show appreciation.

If I’d been that trainee, I would have done my best to impress the boss with how well I’d managed and be actively looking for opportunities to prove my worth, wouldn’t you?
I agree with haircutz , I have found that when I have given any extra responsibility to young employees they have relished the chance to show they can do a good job and it can make them feel more appreciated that you are entrusting them with something important. It’s a shame this one seems to be taking advantage and jeopardising what could be potentially really good job for her in the future. Maybe she is still quite immature and a warning could be what she needs to up her game and prove herself.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#18
Haircutz, I worship at your feet. Such clear direction.

Redlottie - sorry Hun, you need get rid asap, but unfortunately apprentices have totally different rights. You can't always sack them. You need to speak to your trainer about the attitude issues and go through a formal process. You must have a paper trail to protect yourself. You also can't deduct from her wages, but you can tell her that she has to make up time.

I had similar issues last year so I totally feel for your situation.
Can I ask how it panned out?

Ah ok I never realised , I'll call the college then thank you x
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#19
Have you considered introducing commissions? Less hourly pay, more profits from sales - that way, if she isn't making money, shes the only one to blame. Plus, that kind of constant lying should be discussed. We've had a similar situation where one of our stylists, was caught red-handed, leaving the salon early and even stealing some of our products. After the owner spoke with her and mentioned that she should find another business to work it, everything changed - now she's great to work with. A little scare tactic never hurts!
Wow, and she changed her attitude and re built trust?

I think it's great you guys gave her another chance but how did you trust her again ? Pretty serious things she done too!
 

TheDuchess

Well-Known Member
#20
Hi Redlottie

We had a tricky situation with our first apprentice. She worked for us for a year part-time before she started her apprenticeship so we knew her. We also knew that she was in a very poor personal situation and we felt very sorry for her. Unfortunately she started turning up for work late and smelly. Then phoning in for work sick. Then turning up late saying that she was sick. Then announcing that she was pregnant. Then not turning up for work at all.

Trouble was, when clean and freshly washed she was great. Clients liked her, we liked her, she seemed very mature and sensible. Her work was excellent. It was frustrating to see her ruining her chance for a better life.

You can't save everyone. She had to go and she has. The way I see it, apprentices teach you how to be the Boss.
 
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