How to stop an acrylic brush losing its hair?

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denisedeer

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I am new to acrylics and i have brought 2 salon system acrylic nail brushes and both times i've used them the hair has come out of the holder, this is really frustrating.
Im also using the salon system liquid and powder.
Am i doing something wrong or is it just a rubbish brush
 

Christy.

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Welcome to salon geek!

Unfortunately I think it's your brush. Have a search on here for brushes, you'll find loads!x
 

brittone05

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I would agree also that it is the brush. Try to get yourself a good quality brush with hand tied Kolinsky sable bristles if possible :D xx
 

Chickafish

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I am new to acrylics and i have brought 2 salon system acrylic nail brushes and both times i've used them the hair has come out of the holder, this is really frustrating.
Im also using the salon system liquid and powder.
Am i doing something wrong or is it just a rubbish brush
Some cheaper brushes just do that. You can "pinch" the brush if you're really keen on using them. Get a pair of pliers. About half a cm. up the holder, use the pliers to give it a light squeeze. The little dent in the holder should be enough to keep the brush hairs in place.
 

butterfly :)

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might just be the odd brush thats doing that.. i had one of those brushes when i first started l&p and it never happened with mine. good tip Chicka...i'd never have thought of that if i had the same issue lol :D
 

Dinky

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Get a better brush, nsi or cnd.xx
 

geeg

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It could be that you are wiping your brush too much and bending the hairs against the ferrule of the brush when doing so, which tends to cut and break them off.

Never bend the brush hairs if you must wipe your brush, and never bend them when using the brush either ... It is not always the case that the problem is the brush itself, but how you may be misusing it.

Good training is a wonderful thing. The profile of the OP would indicate that he/she has had none.

A final comment ... Crimping the ferrule of a brush is more likely to loosen the hairs in the brush than to hold them in place better. I do think it is bad advice to tell anyone to crimp a brush with pliers! If you want a crimped brush, then buy one that comes that way.
 
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BobSweden

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In addition to the other comments here, you should be aware that one of the differences between a good brush and a low-cost brush is the length of hair inside the ferrule. In low cost brushes the hair is perhaps 5-10mm inside the ferrule, whereas with expensive brushes the hair is much longer (more hair means more expensive, one reason the price is higher).

The reason to have longer hair is that it helps the brush return to shape after use and it makes the brush last longer.

I got this info from the craftsmen who hand-make our brushes.

When you choose a brush, it's a good idea to use one from a company that has some reputation of being used by competition winning nail techs. In the UK that would include brushes from CND, EZ Flow, OPI, Magnetics, Kinetics and probably some others (we don't sell into the UK today). A good brush will not only last longer with care, but help you develop your skills. A poor brush is a bad investment and will hold your development back (like putting bad tyres on a Porsche ;-)).
 

Chickafish

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I've always used kolinsky brushes for both painting and nails. They're both constructed and assembled the same way. Cheap brushes do have shorter hairs, and are held together in the ferrule with bad adhesive. And because they're most likely mass manufactured, and not hand assembled like a higher quality brush, there's not enough tension in the ferrule due to incorrect size, and with the hairs falling off, even more tension is lost.

I've been given quite a number of cheap brushes through the years as gifts. Pinching it gives it tension. I keep my cheap and newly restored brushes for doing things I would never do with a newer brush. All of them (both cheap nail and painting brushes) are now used for mixing paint on pallets, applying loose bits like glitter, splattering or rough blending paint onto canvas, spreading glue onto hard surfaces to apply charms and crystals, ect.

Sorry for my earlier comment. I shouldn't have left anyone with the impression that they should train with a cheap brush. Cheap brushes are only good for using on tasks you'd never use a good brush for. If you're not a painter or crafter, it's pretty much useless to keep one around. You should invest in a good quality brush as suggested by many.
 

MissLB

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i had a recommedation from a lady i truly respect and admire in my local area, i was using asp when i first started then got my harmony brush it was very good but expensive i know u have to pay alot for a good brush and they can last 6-12 months but found id battered it from training was going to buy another one, but she told me about the NSI royal precision brush and highly recommended it,my god! AMAZING!! dont think ill ever use another brush
 

Wooshka

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I have to 2nd the vote for NSI Royal Precision brush:)

I have tried a few different brushes here and there but I always find myself throwing it down and going back to my NSI RP brush.
If cared for correctly, a good quality brush will last for years. The current NSI brush I'm using now is one of 2 that I use and have used now for just under 2.5 yrs.
They always hold their shape, they always go back into a point and don't hold air bubbles, don't have any hair loss at all and I find it easy to get the right amount of liquid in my brush no matter what size ball I'm needing.

Buying cheap brushes is not a wise investment, it will only cost more in the long run and I totally agree that it can hold up your skills from improving because your always battling with a bad brush.

It's well worth spending say $80 to $100 on a great quality brush that can last for years V's buying a $20 cheap brush that you have to replace every 3 to 6 months.
 

Saras nails

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Get a better brush, nsi or cnd.xx

I'm using a nail brush currently and it's been the worse brush for the bristles coming out
 

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