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Jennifer Young Beauty Despite Cancer - Oncology massage and holistic facial

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yoshilee

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Hi, has anyone been on any of the Jennifer Young Beauty Despite Cancer courses?
I am interested in the Oncology Massage and potentially the Holistic Facial course.
How did you find the training course, materials, case studies etc
Do you find much demand for these services?
I am home based with a dedicated treatment room and offer different types of massage and holistic facial. I would love to be able to offer both these treatments but wonder if there is the demand?
Any advice would be much appreciated, thank you.
 

squidgernetball

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I haven't don't them but have heard really good feedback about them.

Vic x
 

RosieR

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I also don't offer them, however I completed a Jennifer Young course before we re opened. "Control of cross-infection in a post covid-19 world"
It was excellent and she approached the subject from an oncology bias, which was very clearly done.

Good visuals and well thought out. Took me a few days to get through with a small test at the end of each part.

I don't know what it could lead to for your situation, but as I have a few cancer survivors as my clients you would be onto something new and will benefit those with immunocompromised conditions too.

Food for thought, and all the best.
 

TheDuchess

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Jennifer’s great and her products are lovely for irritated skin.

I did her full training package a few years ago when there the range was smaller. I thought the training was excellent. To my dismay I couldn’t sell her oncology themed services nor her retail products.
 

yoshilee

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Jennifer’s great and her products are lovely for irritated skin.

I did her full training package a few years ago when there the range was smaller. I thought the training was excellent. To my dismay I couldn’t sell her oncology themed services nor her retail products.
Hello, thank you for replying. I've been thinking about Oncology massage for over 2 years. During lockdown I have done the Cancer Awareness training which gives you a better understanding of how cancer and treatments effect the body and skin which was very interesting.

I've come to the decision to not do the JY courses. My aim was to be able to offer Oncology massage in a private setting from my home based treatment room, but I think that you are very right, sadly there seems to be little demand for so many reasons which I can understand.

I've thought about volunteering at a hospice but I know my limitations and I don't think this is something I am strong enough mentally to do.

What I would like to find out is once a person is in remission what are the pre-requistites before I am able to offer them an adapted massage? I do have a handful of clients who had cancer 10+ years ago. With no lymph node removal, no lymphedema, no skin sensitivity etc I have offered massage. I am VTCT L3 trained, on the course cancer was a contra-indication with no mention of can we massage after remission etc.

Hope you are keeping well, fingers crossed this is just a mini-lockdown x
 

TheDuchess

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Obviously advice received from strangers through the internet should always be checked out.

in general assume you can treat. It’s a common sense thing. The idea that massage can spread cancer around the body is misguided nonsense. If massage spread cancer then people would be told not to run, to avoid saunas and certain types of foods - and sometimes people are told to avoid these things so you shouldn’t massage them unless you have oncology training. The do not treat rule is aimed at students with no knowledge - and it’s sensible. Once you’re qualified, more knowledgeable etc then you can treat with discretion - you should stay within your training.

You can massage at every stage of a person’s cancer journey, you just need to adapt your treatment and you need to know a few moves. It may be that you don’t know the moves that are appropriate for someone in unrelenting pain, who is very fragile, but that doesn’t mean that they can’t have a treatment, just that they can’t have a treatment from you.

For people that are basically healthy, you can treat. Just have a detailed consultation etc. If they have substantial post surgery scarring and your gut says to avoid this area, refer them to someone who can take care of their whole body, scar tissue and all. In general, gliding effleurage will be fine (it just might not achieve much improvement). If they feel fine and they are comfortable to have a “normal” massage with no “no go” areas, then just do what you normally would, working mindfully and adjusting your pressure as you would for any client. Heat, aromatherapy, etc, are all fine, deep tissue might feel uncomfortable so adapt as required.

Oncology massage is really about touch treatments for people who feel very unwell, who are frightened and in pain and who might want to chat about their treatment and recovery journey. It covers practical issues like the types of pain medication you might find attached to their body and ways to bolster to support drips etc. Very much about hospice work. It provides reassurance for your insurers that you aren’t going to do something dumb like book someone in for a 90 minute hot stone massage when they’re receiving cancer treatments such as radiology or chemo.

hope that helps
 

yoshilee

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Obviously advice received from strangers through the internet should always be checked out.

in general assume you can treat. It’s a common sense thing. The idea that massage can spread cancer around the body is misguided nonsense. If massage spread cancer then people would be told not to run, to avoid saunas and certain types of foods - and sometimes people are told to avoid these things so you shouldn’t massage them unless you have oncology training. The do not treat rule is aimed at students with no knowledge - and it’s sensible. Once you’re qualified, more knowledgeable etc then you can treat with discretion - you should stay within your training.

You can massage at every stage of a person’s cancer journey, you just need to adapt your treatment and you need to know a few moves. It may be that you don’t know the moves that are appropriate for someone in unrelenting pain, who is very fragile, but that doesn’t mean that they can’t have a treatment, just that they can’t have a treatment from you.

For people that are basically healthy, you can treat. Just have a detailed consultation etc. If they have substantial post surgery scarring and your gut says to avoid this area, refer them to someone who can take care of their whole body, scar tissue and all. In general, gliding effleurage will be fine (it just might not achieve much improvement). If they feel fine and they are comfortable to have a “normal” massage with no “no go” areas, then just do what you normally would, working mindfully and adjusting your pressure as you would for any client. Heat, aromatherapy, etc, are all fine, deep tissue might feel uncomfortable so adapt as required.

Oncology massage is really about touch treatments for people who feel very unwell, who are frightened and in pain and who might want to chat about their treatment and recovery journey. It covers practical issues like the types of pain medication you might find attached to their body and ways to bolster to support drips etc. Very much about hospice work. It provides reassurance for your insurers that you aren’t going to do something dumb like book someone in for a 90 minute hot stone massage when they’re receiving cancer treatments such as radiology or chemo.

hope that helps
Hi, thanks for your reply, it's very helpful and has given me a lot to think about. Given that the statistics indicate as many as 1 in 2 will have cancer it is something I need to thoroughly consider, be comfortable with and 100% sure I am doing what is best for the client. I will definitely do a more in depth consultation and I think the JY Cancer Awareness Level 1 course has given me a good starting foundation on questions to ask, things to look out for etc etc. Once clients are in remission and well, I hope that they will be reassured and feel looked after by me and safe. Thanks for all your advice
 

Holisticfreak

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In this case for your last post, I’d refer to your insurers. They may be happy for your to treat a patient previously diagnosed and treat for cancer with a letter from their GP/specialist.
Or potentially a client with untreatable cancer.

Ultimately be guided by your insurers. It’s a scary one because a lot of people are almost ‘trained’ to think cancer is pushed around the body through massage! But your insurers may have some leeway and hopefully you can open up to more patientS who thought they may not to be able to have a pamper :)
 

yoshilee

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In this case for your last post, I’d refer to your insurers. They may be happy for your to treat a patient previously diagnosed and treat for cancer with a letter from their GP/specialist.
Or potentially a client with untreatable cancer.

Ultimately be guided by your insurers. It’s a scary one because a lot of people are almost ‘trained’ to think cancer is pushed around the body through massage! But your insurers may have some leeway and hopefully you can open up to more patientS who thought they may not to be able to have a pamper :)
Thanks for your reply. The problem with asking insurers is that they pretty much always say refer back to what you were taught in your training. In the VTCT L3 diploma we did not cover remission.

As per the advice from The Duchess, I will take a common sense approach along with what I have learnt in my Cancer Awareness training, contraindications resulting from this and from what I have learnt in all my massage training.
 

Jo Sunshine

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Hi

I have trained with Jennifer young and offer oncology lifting and rejuvenating facial.

The training was four years ago and it was a weekend in classroom of practical and theory followed by exams and case studies.

The knowledge you gain is so valuable. I lost my father through cancer and thought I knew quite a bit already but it’s an amazing thing to do the training as it educates you to not only the treatments but medical terminology, all the differing treatments of cancer and the implications of radiation etc to client & yourself. You are able to treat a person diagnosed with cancer , between treatments and beyond. It is important to understand the implications of massage following lymph node removal for example - effleurage massage could lead to amputation a week later!!
Not all cancer is life threatening and lots of people are alienated simply by ignorance and lack of training. I myself have treated in a hospice environment but found that a little too emotional. I prefer to offer treatments in salon and have found that the ladies are overwhelmed by the fact they are not a person labelled by cancer they leave feeling like themselves as they are treated normally.

when a client books a Jennifer young treatment we know they have had or are living with cancer. We know the procedure. We don’t need to grill them in a consultation - they are simply given a diagram of
Head neck body aspart of consultation and asked
If they would mark a ‘x’ on any area they would prefer not to be touched.

I highly recommend getting the extra training. And with Jennifer you g you will be insured.
 

TheDuchess

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As a former Insurance broker I can say that it’s never a good idea to ask for advice! The general rule is that if a client is asking their insurer how to do their job - then they are exceeding their areas of professional expertise.

much better is to approach your insurer and say “I need cover to include X, I am qualified to provide these treatments and will screen for contra indications before each treatment.” I usually have these conversations at the start of the insurance period and occasionally I won’t be able to proceed with the cheapest quote because it’s obvious that the insurer doesn’t really understand the industry and therefore won’t have my back.

You can of course use your insurer for advice on all sorts of things you just need to phrase your enquiry carefully. During lockdown a number of therapists started offering virtual consultations. Insurance professionals were all home working of course, so not able to consult with colleagues in the usual way and the results was chaos. Whether you got the go ahead or not really depended on who picked up the phone! Those therapists that asked for “how should I do this?” advice were routinely turned down. Those that said “I’m just doing what I normally do, minus the touch part of a treatment, I thought I should let you know” were mostly given the go ahead.
 

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