Lamps with gel polish range

#1
I just wondered how many techs use the LED lamps with the corresponding gel polish line? Thanks.
 

Noodle

Moderator
Staff member
#2

Beautiful-you

Well-Known Member
#3
Yes, I do :)
 

#4

Noodle

Moderator
Staff member
#5
I do too :)

Thanks - I've read similar articles so I just wanted to get an idea of whether many other techs actually heed the warning!
Would you be willing to take a risk if a client were to make an insurance claim against you? I’ll assume the answer is “not a chance”.
 

Jess23

New Member
#6
I do
 

Trinity

Brush Slayer Geek
#7
I do
 

Scrubadub

Active Member
#8
I do
 

NancySyd

Well-Known Member
#9
I do. Two brands, two lamps.
 

Anna Ljungberg

Well-Known Member
#10
I also do!
 

Minkeybox

Well-Known Member
#11
Me too! 2 brands so 4 lamps in total (2 each brand) xx
 

#12
I do, I have the Gelish 18G original lamp for my Gelish products and a Cuccio LED lamp for the Cuccio gels, I’d just prefer to be confident that I’m fully covered by my insurance and that the products are working as they were designed to. It’s expensive to buy a full new system with a lamp but I guess it would be more expensive to get sued! :eek:
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#13
Supposing you are correct, how does that actually benefit you or fellow nail techs trying to make a living out of ‘doing nails’?
I think you’re focusing on the wrong issues if you’re serious about building your own Nail business.

Anyone can buy a box dye and colour their own hair much more cheaply than visiting a salon. So why do lots of clients still visit a salon to get their hair coloured?
A cheap little car will get you from A to B just the same as an expensive luxury brand car but some people still prefer to purchase the expensive car.
You can buy cheap ingredients from Lidl & Aldi to cook a meal, but sometimes, you’d prefer to eat out at a nice restaurant.

Leave the generic lamps to the diy-ers.
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
#14
Where did you come up with this?
> "new led technology the variance of the wavelengths on the light spectrum is much lower, probably -5 to 5 nm."

===
> "Scientifically, this would mean that if a gel is made to cure at 400nm then any uv led lamp would cure it unless there is an issue with the lamp or process itself - hand too far away, dirty lamp, etc."

Wavelength is not affected by hand too far away, dirty lamp.

===
> "if the industry says you need the lamp that matches the brand then they will expect you to have it. However, I’m just not sure that this is scientifically right. Lamps are expensive and I really think that lots of people are being taken for a ride by companies who have released new gel lamps but said you still need a specific one for their brand."

Where are your qualifications or scientific evidence to dispute this?

Perhaps you also dispute this statement by the British Association of Dermatologists:

"make sure that you use the recommended UV lamp for curing, and read the instructions carefully. Using the wrong lamp may mean that the gel polish does not cure properly, and this means an increased chance of allergy. Avoid any direct skin contact with the (meth)acrylate nail product.”

I've written a very complete article which is the top post on this forum. This is based on my experience developing UV gels during the past nine years within our company, employing two chemists and having done significant additional allergy related research myself. If you have any facts that dispute anything that I have written, I would be happy to discuss this.
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
#15
You are making the same mistake that so many make, including educators and brands. You are ignoring the UV Illuminance generated by the UV/LED lamp - similar to brightness. While UV lamps either generate UV at 365nm and/or 405nm, the UV Illuminance - the amount of UV energy that lands on the nail per m^2, is vastly different. The difference is like tuning a radio to a specific wavelength for a radio station, and having different volume levels.
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#16
I’m not surprised you’re confused if your tutor is telling you something that is considered contrary to industry best practice.
However, never be afraid to query the status quo.
 

Beautiful-you

Well-Known Member
#17
To be honest, on the nail courses I've been on the tutors only mentioned that it was the wattage of the lamp that was important. And in fact, even some brands just recommend using a lamp with a specific wattage too! So its definitely no wonder nail techs get confused. I think until all educators are on side with this and are actually educated themselves to understand how lamps really work it will be hard to convince some nail techs. Could it be made part of the curriculum? And also more in depth training about allergies?
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
#18
This misunderstanding is because most brands simply private label their products. This means that they don't have access to a chemist to obtain a better understanding and the factories who sell the products tell them that any UV lamp will cure their gels and GP. This is why those companies who do develop their own products know the truth and recommend that their compatible UV lamp must be used, and those that private label often don't - and many offer multiple UV lamps, none of which have been properly tested for compatibility.

This and information about allergies and how to avoid, is part of some schools curriculum. But there is no national standard, and schools/brands are free to teach what they want. In many cases, this knowledge simply does not exist as they themselves have been poorly educated. It is a cycle of ignorance that unfortunately leaves many NT exposed to developing allergies without understanding why. It is really a scandal, IMHO.

You can obtain more information about allergies and download a short booklet, from www.saynotoallergies.today. I'd also recommend that you follow Doug Schoon on Facebook and buy his books which are packed with useful information.
 

GemGrayx

New Member
#19
Yes I do. Jessica Geleration as my main brand, but I also do use Bio sculpture gels that cure under the Jessica lamp too x
 
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