Mixing wax brands (Lycon + cheaper brand)

riva

Active Member
A new therapist who just joined told me that in her previous place, they used to mix Lycon with a cheaper brand - and ended up having a really excellent wax. She finds ours to be too hot for the same amount of runny-ness (we use Hive). We do get complaints every so often that our wax is too hot. She's suggesting that we do the same. Is this common practice and is it a good idea? (Not sure if her previous place actually advertised it as Lycon so not sure if there's any false advertisement here)
 

House Beauty

Well-Known Member
It’s not a good idea. Forgetting that..

The most important thing to take from this is that you shouldn’t need me to say turn your wax down. If you get one complaint about wax being too hot that should be enough for you to realise not to have it that hot, let alone every so often. If you are not careful you will really injure someone carrying on like that.

Wax shouldn’t be like water. It should be like honey. Easy to keep on the spatula and not much mess. Not hot enough to be runny or getting complaints. You need to get comfortable working with the correct temperature for the sake of your clients.
 
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riva

Active Member
My understanding is that for it to be like honey; the wax ends up being too hot. If it were any cooler, its too thick and hard to spread. This is from a new therapist who just joined us (well experience though). My other waxer hasn't said this. I always just like to double check things as its good practice.
Any other opinions?
 

CFBS

Well-Known Member
Perhaps the difference in opinion between the therapists is more to with them having used different brands in the past. It can vary quite a bit as to how runny a wax should be between brands.
I assume you’re using a pot of “warm” wax and applying with a spatula? In which case the wax should not be too hot for the client.

There are different warm waxes:

Honey wax - should be the consistency of runny honey (so if you tip the spatula the wax will easily flow off the spatula)

Cream/creme wax- for example green tea tree wax - this has a thicker consistency when at the correct temperature and flows more slowly off the spatula (more like cake mixture thickness). If you heated a cream wax to the consistency of runny honey wax, then yes, it would be way too hot to use.

Students usually learn to wax with cream wax first as it is more controllable but as they get speedier and more accurate with spatula application technique they will move onto honey wax with a thinner application.

Neither is right or wrong. Just personal preference.
Perhaps your salon should try a few different brands of wax and agree on one that everyone gets on with.
 
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Freelancetrainer

Active Member
I often have clients say the wax is too hot when it’s actually quite low, so low it goes on a tad too thick. Hot wax is temperamental and I’ve found it with every hot wax to date. I’ve tried lots. Holding it on a spatula can help but there’s always a balance when using hot wax. It’s not unusual to find yourself turning the heater up and down throughout the day.
 

Freelancetrainer

Active Member
A new therapist who just joined told me that in her previous place, they used to mix Lycon with a cheaper brand - and ended up having a really excellent wax. She finds ours to be too hot for the same amount of runny-ness (we use Hive). We do get complaints every so often that our wax is too hot. She's suggesting that we do the same. Is this common practice and is it a good idea? (Not sure if her previous place actually advertised it as Lycon so not sure if there's any false advertisement here)
Sounds like it was an excuse for cutting costs.
 
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