Natural nails peeling after 2 Shellac treatments

#1
Hi geeks,

I've had a new customer come to me with perfectly healthy nails which I have applied shellac to. When coming back for her third set her naturals nails had started to peel terribly on her right hand only - peeling so extreme that it created a step down to her free edge. I advised accordingly and she decided to have another set done, and I gave her some complimentary solar oil to use too. As expected the shellac has not lasted very well on the peeling nails. She's due in tomorrow, but likes to soak off herself the day before, so she got in touch today to tell me about the shellac coming off. As for the left hand, the shellac lasted perfectly and the nails underneath are in good health.

I'm a little baffled and feel I need to provide answers, but am struggling what to say, as I certainly don't want to say/ask anything that may seem like I'm blaming it on her nails or something she's doing?!

Just an additional note - she use to have gel elsewhere and eventually she would get peeling. But she said having had shellac before she had never he this problem. Arrghh - looks like the prob is me!!

Would very much appreciate your opinions and advice
Many thanks! Xx
 

vanitybeauty1

Active Member
#2
If she likes to remove them herself this could be the problem, she could be causing damage without realising. If she has had no training she wouldn't know exactly how to remove properly. If it is just on one hand it could be down to her being too forceful with one hand if she is using her non-writing hand x
 
#3
Ohhhhh boy! I agree with vanitybeauty..... She like to "soak them herself"..... Why do I have a funny feeling she's actually peeling them off haha? If removing shellac or any gel for that matter properly there should definitely not be such extreme peeling to the natural nail. If I was you, I'd actually give her a couple of free complimentary removal sessions to show her the difference between improper removal, and proper removal. Almost like a one on one lesson on how to remove it if she insists on doing it herself. Always remember, your business and reputation means everything in this industry :)
 

pure

Super Moderator
Staff member
#4
I agree with the others :) you need to be in control of the whole process to ensure it is done correctly and safely. Tell her that you will remove for her and see if it improves any.
 
#5
Like the others I would say removal. The only other thing I can think of is maybe an oily nail plate so would maybe say use CND nail fresh to dehydrate the nail plate prior to shellac application?
 

RED STAR

Well-Known Member
#6
Not sure i'd be so generous with the one-to-one free bee !!!.
I do think the problem lies with her removal, so i would tell her so.
I think the Shellac client, should be made aware of the commitment to this service, as correct removal is important to the condition of the nail, and longevity of future applications.
To keep the service professional, removal should ideally be done by the tech themselves, prior to the re-shellac. Alternatively, if there is no way they can return for removal, advise they purchase the 'removal tube' and carry out as described.
You can give the best home care advice, but you cannot be sure they will take it! :rolleyes:
 
#7
I understand, for me the reason Id offer it for free is, pardon if I may be wrong - but she's probably doing it herself because she wants to save a little money, and isn't convinced that there's any difference and she doesn't feel it's worth spending the extra money to get it removed professionally . By offering her a free small service that isn't taking loads of your time, at least this way she is getting the proper advice from a professional one on one, she then gets to see the benefit of getting it done by someone who was trained to do it, therefore may convince her fully to always get you to remove it every service. Or at the very least learn a few tricks that she may be doing wrong and doesn't realize. Not only this, but how wonderful will she feel when she sees you've put so much time and effort into her. One impressed clients will give you a ton of new clients. Nothing bad has ever been said about small acts of generosity :)
 

Wee Fee

Active Member
#8
I understand, for me the reason Id offer it for free is, pardon if I may be wrong - but she's probably doing it herself because she wants to save a little money, and isn't convinced that there's any difference and she doesn't feel it's worth spending the extra money to get it removed professionally.
Yes. This is exactly why I charge the same for a Shellac Manicure as I do for a Re-Shellac, including removal.
 

#9
Yes. This is exactly why I charge the same for a Shellac Manicure as I do for a Re-Shellac, including removal.
Me too.

Unfortunately a lot of clients think this applies even if we didn't apply their 'shellac'. We only charge to remove someone else's product. We never charge if we re shellac and will waive charges if it's a removal on a really good client.

Vic x

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#10
I couldn't agree more! Client satisfaction is sooo important in our industry.
 
#11
Is it on her non dominant hand? When I'm removing on myself I'm rougher on my right hand as I'm using my left hand which I haven't got as good control over, maybe she's damaging it this way?
 

#12
Thanks so much for your replies geeks, really appreciate the response!

I think you may be right that problem lies in the 'at home removal'. I've gone through removal with her and from what she says she's doing it right... Maybe I'm a bit naive but I believed her, so was wondering if it was something else?!

As it is, I actually don't charge for the removal of shellac at all! So it's not a financial decision, Ive said several times, removal is free I'd be happy to do it! But she's adament. Now I have to step carefully as the lady to use to do her gel and then more recently shellac, is her best friend! She's started coming to me though because her friend now lives too far away. Apparently her friend has provided the products to remove and showed her how, so I need to be careful not undermine her. I have said I will go through her removal tomorrow and that she should, bring the product she is using to remove with. I just don't want to insult my client or her friend!

I will take a pic tomorrow, as the nails are proper thick chunks pulled away from the free edge, this doesn't just look like heavy handed removal, this looks like they've been ripped off?! Hence thinking perhaps it could be more a nail health issue, but then if it was, surely her last set of shellac would've come off prematurely if her nails were in a state underneath? I'll try and get a pic tomorrow as it I've never seen it this bad and I've seen picked off nails before, but this is much more dramatic.

Hum I will report back!
Many thanks geeks! Xxxxx

P.s it was her dominant hand that the peeling was on, so yes the difficult one to do bless her!
 
#13
Smart to ask her to bring the products she uses to remove her gel. Also ask her if she recently started talking any medication that is causing dryness anywhere else on her body, eyes, mouth ect. Could also be a huge factor
 

pure

Super Moderator
Staff member
#14
Yes. This is exactly why I charge the same for a Shellac Manicure as I do for a Re-Shellac, including removal.
Yup me too, removal is included in my price for Shellac :)
 

#15
Do you think she's maybe peeling them off but telling you that she isn't and telling you what you want to hear? Also is she maybe very heavy handed? I find a lot of people use their nails as tools so will be putting extra strain onto the edges of her nails for picking things up opening things etc? Does she use the oil daily that you have given her? Does she use gloves when using chemicals? X


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#16
1.. The remover that she is using and how long she is soaking is crucial to know. CND Nourishing Remover made all the difference for me and I will not use anything else... ever.
2.. Solar Oil. I give my clients a mini with their first manicure and advise them not to use any other product.
3.. Wear gloves when cleaning or doing dishes!

If they don't... I will know.
 
#17
Me too.

Unfortunately a lot of clients think this applies even if we didn't apply their 'shellac'. We only charge to remove someone else's product. We never charge if we re shellac and will waive charges if it's a removal on a really good client.

Vic x

Sent from my GT-I9505 using SalonGeek mobile app
Agreed! I only charge for removing products applied by others or if it's a complete one off from a client. Otherwise it's comp to remove with re-application or if they fancy a break from gels but I know they'll start up with them again soon (or if they're also a regular waxing client for example) then I'll still do it comp.

The more people damage their own nails and then blame the product, the less likely it is they'll keep having it applied!
 

#18
Thanks again for all your helpful advice views and comments.

Totally agree on the removal issue and as I said previously my removal is part of the service, I don't charge for it! But at the same time I guess in hindsight, I'm a bit easy going and very trusting! I often give out solar oil minis complimentary just to ensure they look after them and I do try to push the aftercare, but then I'm a bit soft and always believe it must be me if something goes wrong so I do all repairs for free too.

Anyway, she came back last week and her hands nails and cuticles were ver very dry!! She didn't bring the remover but said it was actually boots nail polish remover. She also admitted to not using the solar oil very often. The peeling and dryness led me to advise her to have a nourishing manicure treatment rather than the shellac while her nails recovered. As she was going away she wanted something more long lasting so I did her a set of bio sculpture gel nails as the nails I thought were to dry and flaky for shellac. Unfortunately they're chipped again :( which is weird as I've never had bio "chip" before. I starting to wonder if this is an underlying health issue as the only time I've seen something similar was a lady post radiotherapy and another with thyroid probs. xx
 
#19
Thanks again for all your helpful advice views and comments.

Totally agree on the removal issue and as I said previously my removal is part of the service, I don't charge for it! But at the same time I guess in hindsight, I'm a bit easy going and very trusting! I often give out solar oil minis complimentary just to ensure they look after them and I do try to push the aftercare, but then I'm a bit soft and always believe it must be me if something goes wrong so I do all repairs for free too.

Anyway, she came back last week and her hands nails and cuticles were ver very dry!! She didn't bring the remover but said it was actually boots nail polish remover. She also admitted to not using the solar oil very often. The peeling and dryness led me to advise her to have a nourishing manicure treatment rather than the shellac while her nails recovered. As she was going away she wanted something more long lasting so I did her a set of bio sculpture gel nails as the nails I thought were to dry and flaky for shellac. Unfortunately they're chipped again :( which is weird as I've never had bio "chip" before. I starting to wonder if this is an underlying health issue as the only time I've seen something similar was a lady post radiotherapy and another with thyroid probs. xx
Yes medical condition or even a new medication. I'd ask if she's been taking any new medication since the last review of her client file. Thanks for the update! I was curious what happened to her :)
 

busybee32

Well-Known Member
#20
Another thing you need to bear in mind is with these clients who have a lot of de lamination previously it would have flaked away naturally like our skin sheds, but because it has had a coating over it that is slightly tougher than normal polish it can't naturally flake away, the shellac has been doing its job and holding it all together, when you remove the coating the de lamination is evident.
You need to gently remove this de lamination with your koala buffer to allow the reshellac to stick to a firm foundation.
Brisa Lite Smoothing gel will give a better and firmer result if used under Shellac on nails that are uneven from delaminating. In fact BL Smoothing gel was made for nails just like these.

Thinner free edge = wobbly free edge = chips or extra wearing.
Add BL smoothing gel = firm free edge = longer tougher wear time.
 
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