Numbing cream

CatalinaD

New Member
Hi . Can someone recommend a numbing cream or spray for salon use? Thank you
 

nickyjpearce

Member
There are only two legal numbing creams in the UK. Emla and Ametop. Both take about an hour to work and are category P (Pharmacy) products. You can get them from a pharmacy without a prescription but the pharmacist will ask what they're for. All other products that you may see online aren't legal.

Hope this helps

Nicky x
 

CatalinaD

New Member
There are only two legal numbing creams in the UK. Emla and Ametop. Both take about an hour to work and are category P (Pharmacy) products. You can get them from a pharmacy without a prescription but the pharmacist will ask what they're for. All other products that you may see online aren't legal.

Hope this helps

Nicky x
Thank you hun
 

ConnieH

New Member
There are only two legal numbing creams in the UK. Emla and Ametop. Both take about an hour to work and are category P (Pharmacy) products. You can get them from a pharmacy without a prescription but the pharmacist will ask what they're for. All other products that you may see online aren't legal.

Hope this helps

Nicky x
Hope you don't mind me jumping in on this - do you know if we as therapists have to have any formal training or anything to use either of these during treatment? My microneedling training recommended using a numbing cream but I now keep seeing conflicting information on whether we are allowed to apply these to clients skin or not x
 

nickyjpearce

Member
Hope you don't mind me jumping in on this - do you know if we as therapists have to have any formal training or anything to use either of these during treatment? My microneedling training recommended using a numbing cream but I now keep seeing conflicting information on whether we are allowed to apply these to clients skin or not x
Hiya. Simple answer is yes you can use them in your treatments. Think about it from this point of view anything you inject should be prescribed by a registered medical practitioner. Beauty therapists inject Botox and Fillers all the time nowadays and most of the time their clients aren't individually assessed by registered medical practitioners. RMP's have been warned as well that they are not allowed to remotely prescribe now, or they risk being struck off. Its a very grey area that only becomes clear when you understand the law. We have two types of Law (Common Law the highest and deals with criminals). Commercial or statutory law (From which ALL other laws are dervied from and have NO FORCE of law without consent). This is what it all comes down to. CONSENT! If you get yourself some training and are safe and your client understands this and they consent to you using the cream then it is lawful for you to apply. However you will need to obtain them lawfully. This can be done by the client themselves if they go to a Pharmacist. If you decide to buy it in yourself and there are ways then you take the responsibility of the Pharmacist. In any claim it goes back and gets passed through the line of purchase. So it would stop with you if you supplied it. If a pharmacist supplied it, it would go back to them and then they would claim from the manufacturer. People have varying views about this depending on their knowledge and experience. Myself I was trained in the NHS and was medically registered, I gave mine up because there were easier ways around doing things lawfully and legally without it. I'm sure your aware that to do a lot of aesthetic stuff you have to now be registered with a govt authority if your a RMP. There is no such requirement if your not. Therefore what they have done is created a system whereby those that are qualified have to pay more and those that aren't just fly under the radar. People do what they are comfortable doing, and the risks for applying and using topical creams are minimal if used properly, and this is why you discuss all the pros and cons with the client beforehand and get them to sign a waiver, so nothing comes to bite you back. Documentation and records are essential in our field because we have become a very litigious society. The onus however is on them to prove it was your fault and this is where documentation comes in.
Hope this helps X
 

ConnieH

New Member
Hiya. Simple answer is yes you can use them in your treatments. Think about it from this point of view anything you inject should be prescribed by a registered medical practitioner. Beauty therapists inject Botox and Fillers all the time nowadays and most of the time their clients aren't individually assessed by registered medical practitioners. RMP's have been warned as well that they are not allowed to remotely prescribe now, or they risk being struck off. Its a very grey area that only becomes clear when you understand the law. We have two types of Law (Common Law the highest and deals with criminals). Commercial or statutory law (From which ALL other laws are dervied from and have NO FORCE of law without consent). This is what it all comes down to. CONSENT! If you get yourself some training and are safe and your client understands this and they consent to you using the cream then it is lawful for you to apply. However you will need to obtain them lawfully. This can be done by the client themselves if they go to a Pharmacist. If you decide to buy it in yourself and there are ways then you take the responsibility of the Pharmacist. In any claim it goes back and gets passed through the line of purchase. So it would stop with you if you supplied it. If a pharmacist supplied it, it would go back to them and then they would claim from the manufacturer. People have varying views about this depending on their knowledge and experience. Myself I was trained in the NHS and was medically registered, I gave mine up because there were easier ways around doing things lawfully and legally without it. I'm sure your aware that to do a lot of aesthetic stuff you have to now be registered with a govt authority if your a RMP. There is no such requirement if your not. Therefore what they have done is created a system whereby those that are qualified have to pay more and those that aren't just fly under the radar. People do what they are comfortable doing, and the risks for applying and using topical creams are minimal if used properly, and this is why you discuss all the pros and cons with the client beforehand and get them to sign a waiver, so nothing comes to bite you back. Documentation and records are essential in our field because we have become a very litigious society. The onus however is on them to prove it was your fault and this is where documentation comes in.
Hope this helps X
Thank you! That helps a lot! My current practice is to carry out consultations 48hrs before treatment where waivers are signed. I also patch test by applying a small amount of numbing cream to the inside of their elbow at the beginning of the consultation if they decide it’s something they would like to have and when they come in for their treatment I double check that they have had no adverse reaction to the cream. I’m aware obviously that there is a lot more applied before treatment but I feel like it’s a practical step I can take towards preventing a reaction. X
 
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