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Peeling free edges

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Telly

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Hi, I have a couple of clients who have peeling natural nails and there doesn't seem to be anything I can do about it, I have tried all the nail products to help but nothing works, can someone please help, my clients are getting a bit distressed as their nail polish obviously won't stay on very long.
 

suzybaby

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Hi Telly have you tried the Jessica range they have specific nail treatments and have one for peeling nails, also advise your clients to wear gloves when doing washing up or house work and put lots of cuticle oil on I too suffer from peeling nails it find this really helps me my nails have stopped peeling since I changed to Jessica hth xx
 

Telly

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Hi Suzy, thanks for that. They tell me they wear gloves, and one lady has a cleaner! Have tried OPI and Sally Henson and CND treatment products!
 

chocolatepickle

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Are they using cuticle oil!? I get this when I am not using my solar oil, they need to use it daily and wear their gloves.
 

Steepdene

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Hi, my natural nails are weak, split and peel, I've been using the nailtiques formula, plus their oil and I've seen a huge difference, I now have free edges! Hope this helps.
 

serendipity

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Do you cap the free edge?
 

Telly

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Hate to sound dumb but what do you mean by cap?
 

mizzy_dizzy

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Hi Hun have you tryed shellac? It will stop the damage that's already there peeling more, and will give it's ridge filling quallity ,
and help protect the nails from more damage by sealing them ,

shellac Is aimed at natral nail clients, the diffrence will be almost instant

the damage sounds like loss of oil or water (most likely oil) from beetween the layers of the nails, an oil after your client. Uses solvents like water and cleaning products ect...
 

Envy

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Natural nail conditions are very often mis understood, even by nail techs.

Soft nails - overly flexible to the point they tear from the middle of the free edge. These require toughening (more keratin bonds in the nail to stop flexability) A product such as CND toughen up is ideal, it uses DMU to encourage the surface layers to cross link, making this type of nail stronger.

Hard nails - this is the MOST commonly mis diagnosed, most people with hard nails think they are weak and need hardening?!?! This is because they are so hard and inflexable that when they bend they snap from the side (sound familiar?!) These clients then buy hardening treatments that rip out additional moisture and make the nail even harder which leads to PEELING and CRACKING - Never apply a hardner or toughener... these nails NEED moisture....!

Normal (healthy nails) - A healthy nail needs a combination of strength (cross linking) and flexability. Flexability comes from moisture, which is for the human body - water. But as it evaporates as fast as it soaks in, in fact it takes more out with it when it evaporates....
Cuticle oil (if a thin formula, such as the multi award winning solar oil) soaks into little channel through the surface of the nail, this then stops water from evaporating! The human body obviously is mostly water, so it will quickly hydrate the nails FROM INSIDE.... and with the oil stopping evaporation true hydration occurs. This makes the nail flexible without breaking or tearing apart ;)

Foot note - Nail hardeners. Many nail hardners contain formaldehyde (or formalin) both of these cause keratin to cross link, which hardens the nail, making it less flexible. Great in theory, except for 2 major problems.
1) google the health effects of using formaldehyde.....
2) if does NOT STOP working... the longer you apply it, the deeper it penetrates and the more cross links it will create... It will actually turn a nail into a brittle 'glass like' plate, that just shatters apart...

Over and out.
 

mizzy_dizzy

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Foot note - Nail hardeners. Many nail hardners contain formaldehyde (or formalin) both of these cause keratin to cross link, which hardens the nail, making it less flexible. Great in theory, except for 2 major problems.
1) google the health effects of using formaldehyde.....
2) if does NOT STOP working... the longer you apply it, the deeper it penetrates and the more cross links it will create... It will actually turn a nail into a brittle 'glass like' plate, that just shatters apart...

Over and out.
Im sorry , but I think your wrong about this , formaldehyde (or formalin) as far as cosmetics go are the same thing (but they are not really they wear branded the same thing , formaldehyde is a gas and is not in any nail products ... when added to water it is a diffrent chemical struture and becomes formalin (methylene glycol)
witch is proven as in nail products but is harmless as it will only show as a trace,
 

ellewopter

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um formaldhyde is used in liquid form to preserve specimens and embalm corpses is it not? ignore that am doing some research but formalin in still formaldahyde and enough to cause allercic raction, so more than a trace must be present one would have thought??
and i was also under the impression it was formaldahyde ressin most prevalent in nail polishes etc?

Formalin is formaldhyde gas combined with water to make a liquid btw
 
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Envy

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Hi Mizzy Dizzy, thank you for your feedback, please see below re formaldehyde and formalin.

Firstly, I'll retract my statement about googling health effects, come to think of it, there's more junk and fear out there than useful fact - but here are some facts:

Formaldehyde is more complicated than many simple carbon compounds because it adopts different forms. Formaldehyde is a gas at room temperature, but the gas readily converts to a variety of derivatives. These derivatives generally behave similarly to gaseous formaldehyde and are used in industry. One important derivative is the cyclic compound trioxane, the "trimer" of formaldehyde with formula is (CH2O)3. When dissolved in water, formaldehyde converts to H2C(OH)2, a diol (i.e. a compound with two hydroxy groups). Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde are referred to as formalin. "100%" formalin consists of a saturated solution of formaldehyde (this is about 40% by volume or 37% by mass) in water, with a small amount of stabilizer, usually methanol to limit oxidation and degree of polymerization. A typical commercial grade formalin may contain 10–12% methanol in addition to various metallic impurities.

Methanediol, also known as formaldehyde monohydrate or methylene glycol is a product of the hydration of formaldehyde - a 5% by weight solution of formaldehyde in water is 80% methanediol.

Cosmetics, such as nail products are legaly allowed (in the US) to use up to 5% formaldehyde (including from solution derivatives) But in mine and many scientists - such as Doug Schoon it is far to easy to over use it's effects.

Sorry this is full on, but formaldehyde is one of the most incredible compounds for use in polymers and can be sub created into many things, many of which are very helpful, including TAF resin, which is used in nail polish.

hope that helps.
 

ellewopter

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love it!! chem a level now in use!!! wish we could have some more of this would help to get a deeper understanding of what we do on a daily basis, would give anything for a couple of mins of doug's time!! xx
 

mizzy_dizzy

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Hi Mizzy Dizzy, thank you for your feedback, please see below re formaldehyde and formalin.

Firstly, I'll retract my statement about googling health effects, come to think of it, there's more junk and fear out there than useful fact - but here are some facts:

Formaldehyde is more complicated than many simple carbon compounds because it adopts different forms. Formaldehyde is a gas at room temperature, but the gas readily converts to a variety of derivatives. These derivatives generally behave similarly to gaseous formaldehyde and are used in industry.
it is a GAS. when it changes it becomes a difrent entity. no longer formaldehyde
One important derivative is the cyclic compound trioxane, the "trimer" of formaldehyde with formula is (CH2O)3. When dissolved in water, formaldehyde converts to H2C(OH)2, a diol (i.e. a compound with two hydroxy groups). Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde are referred to as formalin. "100%" formalin consists of a saturated solution of formaldehyde (thats what I said when mixed with water ) it becomes something else formalin , that has diffrent carrictoristics , and is not formaldehyde anymore than a glass window is sand, yes it comes from it but is a diffrent thing all togever now, (this is about 40% by volume or 37% by mass) in water, with a small amount of stabilizer, usually methanol to limit oxidation and degree of polymerization. A typical commercial grade formalin may contain 10–12% methanol in addition to various metallic impurities.

Methanediol, also known as formaldehyde monohydrate or methylene glycol is a product of the hydration of formaldehyde - a 5% by weight solution of formaldehyde in water is 80% methanediol.

Cosmetics, such as nail products are legaly allowed (in the US) to use up to 5% formaldehyde (including from solution derivatives) But in mine and many scientists - such as Doug Schoon it is far to easy to over use it's effects.
what do you mean ?

Sorry this is full on, but formaldehyde is one of the most incredible compounds for use in polymers and can be sub created into many things, many of which are very helpful, including TAF resin, which is used in nail polish.
(from Doug schoon) ‘tosylamide formaldehyde resin’. This resin is originally made
using several substances, including formaldehyde gas, but
the resin is totally different. It’s very thick, sticky, doesn’t
evaporate and has completely different properties from
formaldehyde gas. This resin can contain tiny trace amounts of
formaldehyde residuals, but those levels are well below those
found in nature.
I agree and I do love to learn about these things, and I know that you have now retracted what you said about the health risks but it is worth letting people know that it isnt a harmful toxic amount in cosmetics, a trace of something thats changed form is not more than that,
I think if we dont get the truth out it can spred and then you have clients that wont want to come and all the rest of the issues , people forget everything is toxic it just depends on the dose!
.
.....
 

mizzy_dizzy

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ellewopter

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Oh wicked thanks chick!!! xx
 

Envy

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Ok, I think we’ve probably given most peeps a headache reading this, but I still want to clarify a few points on formaldehyde in the nail industry, just so we can all be clear and understand this chemical without ‘chemophobia’

What I am primarily referring to is ‘nail hardeners’ that use formaldehyde

Cosmetics, such as nail products are legaly allowed (in the US) to use up to 5% formaldehyde (including from solution derivatives) But in mine and many scientists - such as Doug Schoon it is far to easy to over use it's effects.
what do you mean ?
“Using a product with a formaldehyde level greater than 1 percent dramatically increases the risk of allergic reactions and may cause the natural nail to rapidly become brittle. In the United States, nail hardeners may legally contain up to 5 percent formaldehyde as formalin (a stabalised form of formaldehyde that is used in nail hardeners)
Clients usually are confused when the nail plate loses flexability. They think their nails are getting stronger. Clients assume that harder and stiffer nails must be stronger, but they are wrong! Although the plate will bend less, it has actually lost strength and durability. Prolonged or overuse of formaldehyde hardeners can cause the nails to become split, dry and brittle. This does not happen with nail polish, since it contains less than 0.002 % formaldehyde. This extremely tiny amount comes from using TAF resin as an ingredient. These traces of formaldehyde are far too low to cause concern unless the client is already allergic to formaldehyde, perhaps from previous repeated overexposures to formaldehyde nail hardeners”
– Extract from Dough Schoon, ‘Nail structure and product chemistry, 2nd edition

This goes right back to the original post, with questions as to why a client may get peeling and dry nails when wearing nail polish. I do agree that every chemical can have a ‘safe’ use, and also an ‘unsafe’ use.

It is good to question and understand when and how….

Hope that helps
 

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