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Perplexed: 4 + 6 isn't the same as 5?

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hairlover101

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Hi everyone!
When I color a client's hair, I normally stick to one shade. I use l'Oreal, and the shades selection is so big that I feel it's enough.
Today I spoke with a senior colorist, much more experienced than me, that told me that when he wants to achieve a shade, he always mixes two shades:

In the specific case we were coloring our client's pre-lightened 8.3 hair to a cool brown (5.1). I wanted to use simply the 5.1, but he told me I was very wrong, and he told me I always have to mix 1/2 of 4.1 plus 1/2 of 6.1. Is it this something you are familiar with? I always thought it's the same as using the color in the middle... (4 + 6 = 5)... but mixing them I am wasting more product! Or it will give another result? I am a bit afraid to try it on clients.

At school I learned that when you mix two shades, the lightest one gives the level, and the darkest deepen the color and makes the tone stronger. Working with demi permanent this is not true anymore, isn't it? Since you don't lighten the hair, mixing two shades doesn't really makes sense.

Please correct me if I am wrong! I have a huge doubt about it, and I couldn't find someone to explain this to me properly. I searched the web also, but without luck. Plus, there was no demi permanent range in L'Oreal when I learned!

hugs!
 

Mands

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I've always been under the impression if I've ran out of a colour I can make it that way. But if the colours sat there why would you mix it up yourself. I'm confused I'd like to know the science behind this too x
 

Haircutz

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Lauren121

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That was a good read thanks @Haircutz ! X
 

kamm88

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I would have thought you'd only use the two if you'd ran out of the 5.1.
 

surf girl

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adamlea87

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@hairlover101 If you are using Majirel or INOA the levels are calibrated enough that you can mix colours a level apart without seeing a noticeable difference. If you mix levels too far apart it will end up looking darker and your tonality can shift too. The swatches below are mixing a level 5 using INOA. The only difference is that I only used the basic shades rather than tones like ash, but you can see the difference in depth as you go too far apart. Thanks for linking that post @Haircutz !


As for the point about the lighter colour giving the level and the darker one deepening it, I think you are referring to whats classically known as the lift/deposit ratio. This basically means the the darker the colour (e.g. base 1), the more pigment it has (deposit) but the least ammonia (lift), where as the lighter the colour (e.g. base 10) has the least amount of pigment/deposit but the most amount of ammonia/lift. With L'Oreal the lift is primarily controlled by your choice of oxidant, so it's not something that you really need to worry about when using the line.

You can still mix levels apart with the demi permanent shades, I sometimes do it I need to make a colour that doesn't exist at a certain level.
 

surf girl

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@hairlover101 If you are using Majirel or INOA the levels are calibrated enough that you can mix colours a level apart without seeing a noticeable difference. If you mix levels too far apart it will end up looking darker and your tonality can shift too. The swatches below are mixing a level 5 using INOA. The only difference is that I only used the basic shades rather than tones like ash, but you can see the difference in depth as you go too far apart. Thanks for linking that post @Haircutz !


As for the point about the lighter colour giving the level and the darker one deepening it, I think you are referring to whats classically known as the lift/deposit ratio. This basically means the the darker the colour (e.g. base 1), the more pigment it has (deposit) but the least ammonia (lift), where as the lighter the colour (e.g. base 10) has the least amount of pigment/deposit but the most amount of ammonia/lift. With L'Oreal the lift is primarily controlled by your choice of oxidant, so it's not something that you really need to worry about when using the line.

You can still mix levels apart with the demi permanent shades, I sometimes do it I need to make a colour that doesn't exist at a certain level.
Nawwwww missed your scienceyness I have :)
 

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hairlover101

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Thabk you so much!!
 

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