Pregnancy spray tan

shazza1978

Member
Please can you lovely ladies give me some advice?
A lady has asked me to spray her next Wednesday and she is having a caesarean the following day. Obviously a patch test will be carried out but does she need permission off her midwife?
 

collin

the original not the fake
best to avoid this and let this lady focus on her birth issues ...a spray tan is the last thing she should be thinking about
 

Pink flamingo

New Member
totally agree with collin. i offer tanning treatments, however if the client is pregnant I just wont do. I'm aware during training that once past a certain point they say tanning is fine to do, however I just refuse blank to tan. the baby should be priority.
 

House Beauty

Well-Known Member
There are many tans that manufacturers recommend not tanning pregnant women with. It’s not because the tan goes patchy or oddly streaky (which it often does with hormones) but because of the inhalation risk to the baby.

Whilst her op is tomorrow, I’d just be a bit wary because they are often because of an issue with babies health that requires it.

I don’t tan pregnant women, a) because the tan I use is not suitable during pregnancy b) because of my insurance and c) Because of my personal choice. A pregnant lady buying a beer and then drinking it is a bit different because it’s not like the bartender is pouring the beer down her throat, she is. Us spraying is like that to me. She can absolutely decide what she puts on her body and use a self tanner on her body, but we should not be putting stuff in her lungs during pregnancy unless we are doctors. At the end of the day it’s a chemical and pregnant ladies can’t even take anti-histamines, which is why allergies are so hard to treat during pregnancy. Anything she inhales goes straight to the baby.

But of course, my own business is different to yours and you need to make the decision for your client.

If you are comfortable with it, and she is happy with it, and she has a bit of paper from her doctor or signs something to say her doctor is ok with it, your insurer is ok with it, then go ahead; but not without that paper.

It might be better to say you are fully booked to save her getting stressed and part about it. A pregnant lady didn’t read the info i sent her the day before her tan and when I said that I don’t do it (I don’t do any treatments in first trimester as midwives recommend), she hit me and then was howling in my hallway for 30mins and screaming. Not the safest predicament i’ve been in.
 

collin

the original not the fake
of course each therapist will have varying views on this based upon both personal views and the views of that of the brand training they have undergone training with in the first instance

The best ,safest and most appropriate way of going forward on this,particularly given the operation aspect of things the following day would be to check with your insurer for a definitive view on this...would you be covered under your insurance policy in the event things didn't go according to plan

This approach would enable a definitive position on this and in so doing remove any personal views on the matter and risk involved to both your customer,you and your business

In general terms and generally going forward when in doubt with anything it is a good strategy to always act on the side of caution...if in any doubt about what you are being asked for use the "no" protocol or check it out with your insurers is the way to go

Better to be fully safe than sorry
 

Lynn3631

New Member
What Tanning solutions do people use, im currently using Sienna for spray tans but not to happy with it x
 

collin

the original not the fake
What Tanning solutions do people use, im currently using Sienna for spray tans but not to happy with it x
not thread related posting LOL

but google is a good option or start another thread or search threads ..there's plenty there ;))
 

shazza1978

Member
Thank you to all of you. My gut instinct is saying no. I will call her and explain it to her.
 
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