Puppy question to those experienced owners/breeders

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airendaie

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We got our latest dog when we lived in France. Over there the recommended age is 12 weeks and the youngest possible 8 weeks. Had all our other dogs around 12 weeks but this one at 8. At 8 weeks you have to pay a lot more attention and give the dog more time than at 12. So for me it wouldn't be a problem taking a pup at 7 as you have to do the same amount of work at 8 anyway! Lol hope that makes sense!

Let's face it, we're not talking about a poor pup taken from his mum at a few weeks old and fed on a bottle. At 7 weeks they'll already be weaned and playing with the rest of the litter. I would go for it and worry about the rest to come :D rather than about a week here or there.

How exciting a new baby life to get to know and teach about the world! x x
 

*Lisa-Marie*

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Most pups are separated from their mum at 4-5 weeks as it can become too much for the mum so humans step in to feed and wash pups. Mine was in a diff room from his mum from 3and a half weeks and they had an hour contact a day I was mum from 5.5 weeks and he is the easiest dog to train listens to every word :) x
 

ChicUnique

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When I got my pup she was 6 weeks. And the vet had told them to separate them from mum (or so we were told anyway) and she was fine.
My mums dog had puppies earlier this year and although they were taken off of mum and into solids at about 4-5weeks they weren't put to their new homes until 8 weeks.
 

sunshineinme

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Ladies- you are amazing! I take on board all your opinions and advice!

I am fully against the crates and cages and I am happy to spend with the little one all the time in the world it needs. My husband is very supportive and I am confident that between two of us we'll provide a good home for our pup.

I'd prefer the pup to be with us rather then on its own after the separation from its mum.

Every and any advice is welcomed :) c
 

gillian w

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Ladies- you are amazing! I take on board all your opinions and advice!

I am fully against the crates and cages and I am happy to spend with the little one all the time in the world it needs. My husband is very supportive and I am confident that between two of us we'll provide a good home for our pup.

I'd prefer the pup to be with us rather then on its own after the separation from its mum.

Every and any advice is welcomed :) c
There is nothing wrong with caging them when young it gives them a safe quiet place of their own and keeps them from harm.

My labrador would have chewed the house up with out her crate when we had to leave her,it had a blanket over the top so was like a den.She was always quite happy to go in it.She slept in it the first night at home with a piece of vet bed that her mum and siblings had also been on and we were lucky to have no whining or crying.

We put it away when she could be trusted not to eat the furniture lol.I think that was probably about 5/6 months.
 

Lauralou991

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Ask if you can wait till at pup's 8 weeks old I got my Maisie when she was 6 and a half weeks old due to circumstances but she's been really hard to toilet train where as my old dog pip was trained with in 4 days and she was 8 and a half week old :) I know it's hard having to wait them extra few weeks but it's better because they are easier to train? :) hth /:)
 

chazz!!

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Debs001

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From a breeders point of view my pups were fully weaned before six weeks and by the 4th week mum didn't want anything to do with them as she'd had enough. Yes they had their brothers and sisters to sleep and play with but as long as you give them attention and train them well (as they would learn from their pack) ideally its the 7-8 week mark but I think it's fine, also take into consideration their jabs and when they are allowed outside. I started training my pups to come with a clicker so they were clicker recall trained and partially toilet trained when they went at 8 weeks, you would need to do this if any younger and watch out for separation anxiety if they leave too early, (when weaning I used clicker for food time and they all learned to come to it after a couple of days) I also started the toilet training and lead on. I used a cage for my pups and they loved it (I kept one of the pups and she now sleeps and lays in their rather than the outside beds as she feels safe and cosy in it, it is also good if the postman calls or if I have nervous visitors (I simply say 'in your bed' and she's happy to go in, unlike her mother who whines terribly if I put her in it because she didn't as a pup) hth x
 
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dandelionpoppy

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On the cage aspect, my pup loves hers. I leave the door open during the day and she freely goes in and out and often puts her favourite toy in there.
 

sunshineinme

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I must say that I'm a bit surprised with the cages. I somehow associate them with 'locking animal out' rather then 'creating a safety place'- but it's obviously human way of thinking not the doggy way :) It all obviously depends on the dog and the owner- how the owner presents the cage to the pup. My hubby initially was trying to convince me to have a cage but I am a bit hesitant. It does sound interesting from what you ladies say but I may chose alternative options x
 

Crystal colleen

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I must say that I'm a bit surprised with the cages. I somehow associate them with 'locking animal out' rather then 'creating a safety place'- but it's obviously human way of thinking not the doggy way :) It all obviously depends on the dog and the owner- how the owner presents the cage to the pup. My hubby initially was trying to convince me to have a cage but I am a bit hesitant. It does sound interesting from what you ladies say but I may chose alternative options x
Crates are fantastic we got out bullmastiff puppy at 9 weeks and they are big dogs so we got the biggest one.

Dogs look at them as there safe haven he goes in it when he wants piece and quiet we leave the door open and he just wonders in there.he sleeps in it at night and we shut the door and he loves it.

They also help with training through out the night we used to get up every hour and let him out for a wee or poo and that time scale increases as they get older dogs won't pee or poo where they sleep so they are a good thing.especially as they get older and you need to pop out for an hour they can go in there creat and there safe in there we used to put a Lil safe toy in it and a bed and he would be very content.take there coller of when there in it though.

As otheres have said they won't chew you house up either lol.most vets will suggest getting one to.

Our bully is 10 months old and he still goes in it at night as he can't be trusted
yet lol he would savage everything she's still a baby.

Our dog trainer uses crates still and her dogs are older.

There good for fireworks and thunder to.our pup didn't care about them but now he's bigger he's a big scaredy cat lol.xx
 

Debs001

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Another thing I did which may help is I took a piece of the mum and pups blanket and gave each new owner a square piece to take with them so the pup would have that smell in their new home (maybe ask the breeder if they can do this?) I also had a wheat microwave heated warmer to put in with the pups bed so they felt like they had something soft and warm to sleep with.
 

chazz!!

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gillian w

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Another good reason to have a cage is when i had ruby spayed after the op it was the only way we could stop her from bouncing around when she was supposed to be taking it easy.
 

Only-me

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Got to say I used to say Oo no cages that's bad for a pet but my other half convinced me and it's the best thing ever... It's there little den and no chewing when you out etc def recommend it from day one... They never go toilet in 'their bed ' either so less mess.. Xx
 

Steph41

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My branston had a crate and as he got older he would go in it to sleep etc even with the door open !!!! If I had not had one when he was younger I would not have had a house left !!! He was older when we had him but it was a place that was only his and no one touched him etc when he went in his bed x
 

tanfastic

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I must say that I'm a bit surprised with the cages. I somehow associate them with 'locking animal out' rather then 'creating a safety place'- but it's obviously human way of thinking not the doggy way :) It all obviously depends on the dog and the owner- how the owner presents the cage to the pup. My hubby initially was trying to convince me to have a cage but I am a bit hesitant. It does sound interesting from what you ladies say but I may chose alternative options x

Oh, crates can be a really safe place for a dog, and many do love their little den. It is a really good way of puppy proofing your pup. Some people also have little playpens set up in the kitchen where ther is an area with newspaper to help the toilet training, Obviously you will need to supervise the toileting as you dont want a puppy running around on dirty paper. Eeeeuuuwgh. The only thing that concerned me was that the breeder might not create a positive association with the crate, then it does become a prison for the puppy who is full of beans and suddenly seperated from everything that does make it feel safe.
 

sunshineinme

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Thank you everyone for your contribution. I will show my hubby this thread :)

I was already googling crates today so taking on board all what you've said! I shall keep you updated :)
 

Debs001

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Aw whether you crate or don't, take at 6-7 weeks or wait, as long as you give your pup lots of love and plenty of firm but fair training (especially collies as they thrive on it) you'll both be fine (lots of abandoned or poorly pups start early with human help). I've done the breeding, pup not in a crate, pup in a crate, dogs who have had the upper hand (when i was alot younger and didnt understand dogs) and dogs where I am wholly the pack leader (makes for a much easier life and happier partnership), all I can say is I love my dogs, they are hard work, but with time and patience they give back so much, just take on board they will be a better companion if you look beyond their cuteness and learn a little about their canine instincts and what is best for them not what us humans interpret is best for them, I'm sure your pup will give you lots of pleasure and happiness :)
 

blossom

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Ladies- you are amazing! I take on board all your opinions and advice!

I am fully against the crates and cages and I am happy to spend with the little one all the time in the world it needs. My husband is very supportive and I am confident that between two of us we'll provide a good home for our pup.

I'd prefer the pup to be with us rather then on its own after the separation from its mum.

Every and any advice is welcomed :) c
I hated the idea of a crate

But we got one because the mummy dog was using one when she had her pups, and for those first few weeks, that's where the puppies lived (with their mum) obv had time out of the crate as well but that was "home"

So for our puppy, it made her very secure

And we only used it for a short while just to aid the transition.


I would think if a puppy wasn't used to a crate, it would be counter-productive to use one.

I know people who go out to work and leave their fully adult dog in a crate all day long and that I am totally against. x
 

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