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Rebalance Injury?!?

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Bud

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I carried out a rebalance on one of my clients last night (she has BioSculpture gel overlays - has had them for over a year, i have been doing them for around 4mths). Rebalance was going ok - I know her natural nails are very thin, as I did a soak-off about 6wks ago, so was buffing with care.
However, on the nail of her little finger I suddendly noticed a spot of blood appear on the nail plate!!! :eek: I sanitised her nail quickly and changed / sanitised my wipes / brush / tools etc. I then put a drop of nail glue over the area to stop any bleeding. I'm concerned that this was the wrong thing to do - but remembered a trainer at Star nails suggesting it as a way of stopping bleeding it you nicked any skin around the nail. I drew her attention to it, as I wanted her to keep an eye on it in case any infection developed, especially as she goes on holiday for 2wks tomorrow!!!:confused:
She said there was no pain, but the area still looked a bit red when I'd finished.

She really wanted the overlay on for her hols understandably so I continued to apply Gel over the nail. I advised her to keep a close eye on it on hol, and if there was any pain, swelling, or redness - to find a salon where they could soak it off (i told her to make sure they didn't buff!!). I also explained how she could soak it off herself, if she could get hold of acetone there.

Any prompt advice on anything else I should have done would be VERY gratefully received, as my client goes on her hols for 2 wks 2mrw!:eek: :eek:
 

~bec~

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I would definately get her to look at it every moring and ever night and if she notices any change, i would tell her to see a doctor immediately, before anything gets worse. When i did my training, we were always told to refer anything other than nails to a doctor.

I would contact her regulary until you see her next, if its not too much of a hassle for your client, to see how her finger/nail is going and to find out if there is any change. And if you steralised the area thouroughly, thats the best peventative i would imagine.
(but this is not professional advice!!)
Hope all goes well.

Luv Bec
 

geeg

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If the adhesive you are using is of pharmaceutical grade, then there is no harm whatsoever in 'sealing' a small wound with it. I hope the bleeding had stopped first however. Remember that ECA resins are used more and more in hospitals and surgeries for closing wounds etc.

I'm sure in her post, bec meant sanitise not sterilize as we all know that it is impossible to sterilize the surface of the nail plate. Don't we? If the surface of the nail was well sanitised, then your client will be fine. For future reference, never buff a persons nailplate if you know they are thin already. These nails were and accident waiting to happen and one can only imagine how damaged these plates are to be so thin in the first place. If this is a natural condition, then I would steer clear of enhancements unless you can remove surface shine without buffing ... it can be done.
 

Deb379

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Well that's the first time i've ever heard of adhesive being used to close wounds. How do you know if the adhesive you have is pharmaceutical and safe to use should this situation occur?


deb379
 

geeg

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Deb379 said:
Well that's the first time i've ever heard of adhesive being used to close wounds. How do you know if the adhesive you have is pharmaceutical and safe to use should this situation occur?


deb379
Can't speak for any others than CND and Fabric# which are all pharmaceutical grade resin. You would have to ask.

EC adhesives were first used during the Viet Nam war to close wounds between the battle fields and the hospital. Proprietory brands like 'new skin' are also EC resin. Dentists use various viscosities constantly in Dental work. EC resins were first developed for use on porous surfaces and are completely different to MC resins such as super glue, lock tite etc. You should never use MC resins on nails or the body.
 

angel fingers

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geeg said:
Can't speak for any others than CND and Fabric# which are all pharmaceutical grade resin. You would have to ask.

EC adhesives were first used during the Viet Nam war to close wounds between the battle fields and the hospital. Proprietory brands like 'new skin' are also EC resin. Dentists use various viscosities constantly in Dental work. EC resins were first developed for use on porous surfaces and are completely different to MC resins such as super glue, lock tite etc. You should never use MC resins on nails or the body.
whats ec and mc stand for geeg ? :confused:
 

mgloverfam

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This happened to me back in 99', I even posted about it a while ago. I had a young lady come in for a full set of tips. Her nail plate was very thin, and as I was blending the tips in, she jumped and screamed out! I asked her what was wrong, and she was holding her finger and in visible pain. To my horror, I had filed down to her nail bed (and using the wrong grit....100....ouch!!). Thank GOD it didn't bleed, and she didn't punch me out!! It was extremely red, and I absolutely couldn't touch it because it was too painful. Be very careful with clients who have thin/weak nail plates. also, when you are removing shine or blending MAKE SURE TO HOLD THE FILE FLAT ON THE NAIL PLATE. Use the proper grit, and do not file on an angle, it creates dents, and rings of fire!!
 

geeg

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angel fingers said:
whats ec and mc stand for geeg ? :confused:
Sorry, I shouldn't assume should I?

EC stands for Ethyl Cynoacrylate ... a completely different animal from
MC which stands for Methyl Cynoacrylate.

Yep that Éthyl and Methyl thing again.!! EC resins are designed to be used on porous surfaces and on humans if pharmaceutical grade
!
MC is industrial grade like super glue and the rest and should never be used on the human body.
 

collins

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I use star nails fibre glass system and I have read the back of the bottle of resin and it contains ETHYL CYANOACRYLATE. So just to confirm ( as I never knew that you could bond open wounds with resin) if one of my clients had a split nail and the nail bed was visable I could use my resin directly on it, after sanitising, to seel it up?
 

geeg

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If the nail is thoroughly sanitised and prepared first ... yes you could.
 

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