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Severe waxing reaction, help!

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Chazney55

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Hi i really need help!

I'm 6 months into the running of my new salon and I'm panicking!

I had a client in for a standard facial wax who'd previously tried laser but not been satisfied. Sides of face chin and upper lip and all was fine whilst i was doing the treatment. As soon as i'd finished her skin came up in blister like swellings? She washed her face with cold water and i applied aloe gel until the reaction calmed down, I also gave her some gel to take home with her. When i told her the ingredients in the wax she guessed it was an allergy to the Manuka oil in the wax i used, she acted as if she'd had a reaction like this before.
I told her not to apply anything else to her skin just the aloe if she felt she needed it.
The next day she phoned saying she'd had to go to A&E in the evening coz she felt her skin was burning, the doctors gave her some creams to apply and apparently something for shock due to her hysterical reaction to the state of her skin! The doctor said it looked like she'd been burned! How? The wax was most definitely not too hot, i'd just used the same wax for her arms with no reaction and the client herself agrees it wasn't too hot and the skin on her face was only effected in patches and not at all on her lip which surely would be the most sensitive??
2 days later and her skin has patches of shinyness like she has been burnt but i don't see how this could be, the reaction seems to be superficial and hopefully won't have left any permanent damage. I'm wondering whether her previous laser treatment may have caused her skin to become more sensitive?
I am very worried as this is my own business and it's the first time i have had a serious problem with a client. I'm looking for reassurance that i've not mistreated the client and looking for any advice that anyone can offer on further aftercare i can give to her?
Thanks for any advice you can offer.
 

oey

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Has this client had facial waxing before?

I presume you went through any contra-indications with her before starting the treatment. Was her lazer done recently? I am not aware of laser treatment being a contra-indication though.

Dont panic, I know this probably wont help you but we have insurance for things like this cause they do and can happen.

Speak to your insurance company and take advice from them.

And - have a :hug:
 

Snugglepuss

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Aww hun - don't be so hard on yourself :hug:

Okey doke - are you aware of all the ingredients within the type of wax you use - some people are allergic to beeswax for example - (think pollen and hay-fever) so she might have had a reaction to that (I will stand corrected but I think Gigi wax may contain beeswax).

Also not sure about the laser treatment, but you will be aware that some clients do end up with follicle trauma after being waxed it can show up in different ways in different areas- for example on the chest it might not react until the day after or the client may just get little white spots at the follicles.

Thinking about it perhaps it was because of the laser treatment that the skin etc had become more sensitive -??? how long ago was it since she had the laser treatment???

I know that you said you were sure that the wax wasn't too hot - but just be aware, that the melting point of wax can vary (and can be a lot higher than you think).

I am sure you do this anyway - I always test the temperature on the back of my hand - nice little bald patch on the back of my hand :lol: some like to test it like a baby's bottle on their wrist.

If like Theresa has said you did a client consultation prior to the treatment and you are insured then that is a good thing. You obviously care enough to be worried about both your client and your business :hug:

I'm sure she will have been given an antihistamine cream/medication and all will be OK soon!

Lastly, I just want to say, some people like to lay the blame at other people's doors (not saying this client is) and when you are a caring person you will feel twice as bad and always blame yourself - take a step back and a deep breath and look at everything you have done - if it is all correct and by the book, then there isn't much more that you can do and just perhaps the client needs to take some responsibility for their actions and information they have provided!

Good luck whatever happens :hug:
 

VICKYBROOKES

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hi hun ! what an awful situation to be in chick! u sound like u have done everything as said before by the book . sounds suspicious tho that she kind of new she was allergic to that oil in the wax . !!!!!???
i know nothing about laser treatment tho hun so cant help u there as im fairly new to the beauty industry. im also starting my waxing training next week so cant really coment or give any advice either ! (im sure i will be bak on here asking u lot for advice soon )lol.

the only thing i thought of was with my insurance thro beauty guild there is a dedicated hot line that im sure i can phone in situations like this . and they can give u the right advice in regards to ur client and the situation . i know babtac have this service too .

well done in ur continuous after care treatment and the way u r handling this tho , u sound like u r doing everything u posibly can .

hope another geek can help more than me regarding this problem . take care xxxxx
 

The Guild

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Hi,

As advised above, you should make sure you ring your insurance company. Even if a claim isn't being made, they should be able to guide you in what action you now should or shouldn't take.
 

weezie

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I've seen a hive like reaction on a pregnant lady but it went down in 12 hours and she only had it when she was pregnant. It was itchy red lumps, but looked normal after they went down. I would use aloe vera and an ice pack if necessary to take the inflamation down.

I would definately check with the insurance company but aloe vera gel would help to heal and keep the skin supple. It could be applied after cooling it in the fridge.
 

bombini

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Do you know if she is on any medication ? There are some medications that prevent you from having waxing. I used to take ro-accutene and like an idiot got my friend to wax my eyebrows and they ended up burnt, looked like the skin had come off for about a month (no exagerration!!) :eek:
 

Nicki-Marie

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When i was on ro-accutane even hair removal cream burnt my skin! Cant add anymore to what has already been said. Hope everything comes right. x
 

tinkywinky

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It sounds to me like a similar situation I had, the first time I ever waxed since qualifying, I had a girl who's eyebrows swelled up that bad she had to go to A & E and she had to have a few days off work.

She then told me for a few months how c**p I was as a beauty therapist. Not true. I've had hundreds of satisfied and lovely clients over the years who have come back for treatments.

She had had a severe reaction to the wax itself. Some people like to blame you when it is the product itself. It took me a while to realise this hence me passing this on so you don't feel as c**p as I did.

A few months later she had her legs waxed and hey ho the same thing happened, (despite me warning her that she shouldn't - she got it done somewhere else).

Some people have hypersensitive skin.

As long as the wax was at the correct temperature it is unlikely you personally have burnt the skin, which you know you haven't. It's likely to be a reaction to ingredients. As another geek said, she has a bald patch from testing the wax. I have several bald patches too, before I put any wax on a client I always test it on the back of my wrist or hand and then do a small patch test on them to check it is OK.

Please don't get upset about this and blame yourself, as at the end of the day we all react in some way or another to certain ingredients.

Pollen causes great big hives on my face which are embarassing, but I've learnt to live with it and not blame products. Just take an antihistimine and apply tea tree and it's gone in no time.

What I'm trying to say is everyone reacts from time to time, and some people look to lay the blame on someone else.

hth's xxx
 

huberella

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It definetly is not a burn.. otherwise the client would have complained as soon as you touched her skin with the wax.

It does sound like perhaps your removed skin. This is so easy to avoid. Apply a thin layer of oil on the skin before you apply the wax. This way, the wax is adhering to the hair, not the skin.
 

Mrs.Clooney

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I am only 4 weeks into my beauty therapy diploma and definitely no expert, however, I think it would be important to ascertain when your client had laser treatment to her face which would involve heat penetrating the dermis. This could have been further agravated by the waxing if not sufficiently recovered from the lasering.
 

Beautyandme

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Hi, Its not the same thing, but I can have a reaction to hair colour, my face goes red/itchy and bumpy, and it spreads to my neck. It can take at least a week before it starts to go down. I find though, I dont get it when I colour my hair myself.

Anyway, hope it sorted out soon.

Huberella : What oil do you use prior to waxing?

thanks
 

Elaine143a

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Try not to panick, you seem to have done all you can, although I know how scary this can be when it happens in your own salon!

One thing you really ought to do, if you haven't already, is to make a written note of this in an incident / accident book (which you are supposed to have in the salon). You might also want to contact your local environmental health department and ascertain whether this needs reporting under RIDDOR regulations. Then, if the client does take this further, all your legal responsibilities will have been covered.

Hope this helps.
 

huberella

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nenee

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Hi there

after just reading your story, I thought Id share my story with you. I had my top lip waxed years ago and had the worst reaction ever. My top lip swelled up and I had the worst hive itchy swollen rash ever above my lip on the skin, it then went to a unsightly scab as it healed, Iv never had it done since!

Im now worried, as due to study waxing in college (as im studying NVQ 2 in beauty therapy) and Im very very worried in deed, to having a fellow student practice on me, any advice?? I will speak to my teacher before hand, but Im I allergic to certain wax? and is there alternative types of wax for sensitive people like me? as when I do open my own salon in the future I will be very reluctant to provide waxing on clients due to my experiences, and word of mouth is the worst possible negative feedback.:rolleyes:

nenee
 

pure

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Hi there

after just reading your story, I thought Id share my story with you. I had my top lip waxed years ago and had the worst reaction ever. My top lip swelled up and I had the worst hive itchy swollen rash ever above my lip on the skin, it then went to a unsightly scab as it healed, Iv never had it done since!

Im now worried, as due to study waxing in college (as im studying NVQ 2 in beauty therapy) and Im very very worried in deed, to having a fellow student practice on me, any advice?? I will speak to my teacher before hand, but Im I allergic to certain wax? and is there alternative types of wax for sensitive people like me? as when I do open my own salon in the future I will be very reluctant to provide waxing on clients due to my experiences, and word of mouth is the worst possible negative feedback.:rolleyes:

nenee
Im sure that once you have spoken to your tutor you wouldn't be made to have your upper lip waxed if you didnt want. I wouldn't worry about it to be honest.:hug:
 

huberella

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There are actually very few allergic reactions to the wax itself. If someone has an allergic reaction it is usually to whatever was used as prep or post wax product.

It is very common to have a reaction after having the upper lip waxed... it is usually just a histamine reaction.

But the biggest, most important thing to remember, is to use OIL. I can't stress this enough. Just a basic light massage oil, or tea tree oil will do, and just a very small amount.
 

nenee

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Hi there

Sorry Im a newby in college studying beauty nvq 2 so just want to ask further! When you say add oil, we use sweet almond oil(I have no nut allergies) in college, would this surfice? would I just apply a little of the oil to the skin above my lip prior to the wax being applied? then it acts as a barrier?

I think they used the australian tea tree oil after they waxed in a cream. Iv heard stories that the wax they use for bikini lines etc can be full of bacteria if they do not use a clean spatula everytime they go into the pot and even STDS can be transmitted??:rolleyes: Where I went they are renowned for doing the full wax where nothing left, so obviously they apply the wax in discreet areas, if they are using the same spatula to go back into the pot wont it be a breading ground for bacteria?? could that of been a factor? Someone mentioned It could be the type of wax ie beeswax I could have a problem with, are there different types?
sorry loads of questions but dont want to ask in college as may get some looks?:irked:
cheers
nenee
 

huberella

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Hi there

Sorry Im a newby in college studying beauty nvq 2 so just want to ask further! When you say add oil, we use sweet almond oil(I have no nut allergies) in college, would this surfice? would I just apply a little of the oil to the skin above my lip prior to the wax being applied? then it acts as a barrier?

I think they used the australian tea tree oil after they waxed in a cream. Iv heard stories that the wax they use for bikini lines etc can be full of bacteria if they do not use a clean spatula everytime they go into the pot and even STDS can be transmitted??:rolleyes: Where I went they are renowned for doing the full wax where nothing left, so obviously they apply the wax in discreet areas, if they are using the same spatula to go back into the pot wont it be a breading ground for bacteria?? could that of been a factor? Someone mentioned It could be the type of wax ie beeswax I could have a problem with, are there different types?
sorry loads of questions but dont want to ask in college as may get some looks?:irked:
cheers
nenee
Sweet almond old would be fine. Yes you are correct... use a small amount on the skin prior towaxing.

As for the STD in wax pots.... STD means Sexually Transmitted... not pot transmitted. Wax does not contain water, this makes it an unsuitable environment for bacteria and viruses to thrive.

In most cases, it is not the wax itself that a person has a reaction to, it's the creams etc that are used on the skin prior and after the waxing is done.

If after being waxed you end up with a scab, this means that skin was removed during the waxing process... this is easy to rectify by making sure there is oil on the skin before waxing.

Many people experience a histamine reaction to waxing on the upper lip... especially if it's their first time. I have found that using an astringent afterwards instead of a cream or oil helps with this.

Hope this helps.
 

nenee

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Phew

Thanks for that, wont be worrying about having a wax anymore and getting nasties!!

Il ask in college for them to do that when we do top lip waxing and see how I get on
cheers :)
 

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