Useful info about SP lashes and patch testing

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elliebee

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I thought I would post this in the hope it will clear things up a little for those who are serious about lashing..

I have experienced a major reaction to lash extensions (after having them on for months) and I have tried to find out as much info as possible as to what causes the reaction and what can be done to prevent it.

The most likely cause of a reaction will be the main ingredient in ALL lash glues (regardless of brand) Cyanoacrylate.

The reaction is NOT caused by contact with the skin, but is caused by the FUMES from the chemical as it vaporises. This is why I don't see any point in patch testing by applying glue behind the ear/inside of the wrist etc. I appreciate that some people are taught like this so this is just my opinion.

The glue needs a certain amount of moisture to properly cure. This is why areas which are moist (eyes, inside of nose, throat etc) are particularly prone to irritation.

It can also cause dry, flaky skin around the eyelid area and this, again, is due to the moisture being drawn from the skin.

I've probably not explained that particularly scientifically, but it will hopefully explain a bit about how the glue works, and why a reaction is likely.

5% of people who are regularly exposed to Cyanoacrylate will develop sensitivity in varying degrees resulting in ongoing, flu like symptoms.

There is a lot of misinformation on here about patch testing and a lot of people have come to their own (incorrect) conclusions.

If a client is going to react, they are unlikely to react to the skin test. However, by using the glue on their lashes to apply a few, this should give an indication if they have any sensitivity TO THE FUMES. Obviously this is not fool proof but it is, at the moment, the best way to check.

I hope this post does not upset anyone and make anyone think I am trying to contradict what they have said in the past. It is merely intended to help us understand our products better and safeguard both ourselves and our clients.

If anyone wants any more in depth details on this there is some great info here
Cyanoacrylate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

wowbb

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I totally agree and whilst i know there is some people patch testing theo adhesive on the skin this is something i would NOT recommend anyone doing!
We generally recommend to do a patch test by applying all the products, ie primer, adhesive, debonder and sealant to a few of the natural lashes. You dont have to apply an extensions but merely apply a bit of the product with a microbrush to a few natural lashes to see if the client would react.

Putting the product on the skin is very misleading and dangerous -
a) it should never touch the skin to begin with (neither around the eyes or elsewhere)
b) if a client reacts with this method its a skin reaction so it doesnt give any iclination as to the suitability for lash extensions.
 

FrancescaM

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Well said.

I've always advised that EE glue should never come in contact with skin.
 

kezza*

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I thought I would post this in the hope it will clear things up a little for those who are serious about lashing..

I have experienced a major reaction to lash extensions (after having them on for months) and I have tried to find out as much info as possible as to what causes the reaction and what can be done to prevent it.

The most likely cause of a reaction will be the main ingredient in ALL lash glues (regardless of brand) Cyanoacrylate.

The reaction is NOT caused by contact with the skin, but is caused by the FUMES from the chemical as it vaporises. This is why I don't see any point in patch testing by applying glue behind the ear/inside of the wrist etc. I appreciate that some people are taught like this so this is just my opinion.

The glue needs a certain amount of moisture to properly cure. This is why areas which are moist (eyes, inside of nose, throat etc) are particularly prone to irritation.

It can also cause dry, flaky skin around the eyelid area and this, again, is due to the moisture being drawn from the skin.

I've probably not explained that particularly scientifically, but it will hopefully explain a bit about how the glue works, and why a reaction is likely.

5% of people who are regularly exposed to Cyanoacrylate will develop sensitivity in varying degrees resulting in ongoing, flu like symptoms.

There is a lot of misinformation on here about patch testing and a lot of people have come to their own (incorrect) conclusions.

If a client is going to react, they are unlikely to react to the skin test. However, by using the glue on their lashes to apply a few, this should give an indication if they have any sensitivity TO THE FUMES. Obviously this is not fool proof but it is, at the moment, the best way to check.

I hope this post does not upset anyone and make anyone think I am trying to contradict what they have said in the past. It is merely intended to help us understand our products better and safeguard both ourselves and our clients.

If anyone wants any more in depth details on this there is some great info here
Cyanoacrylate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This is my understanding too, some people will still argue that patch testing is not needed!
 

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