Want to train as an Aesthetician - 33 & worked in marketing for 10 years

Elohelay

New Member
#1
Hi guys,

As my title says I want to become an Aesthetician. I’m currently a digital strategist, and I’m so unhappy with my life. I have been interested in skincare and beauty since I was little, and had always assumed that when I would have children, I would pick up makeup or something, but as time has gone on I’ve realised I just want to give people beautiful skin.

I want to train up to level 3 in facials and skincare, then I’ve got a course on Microblading... then once I’ve got a reasonable amount of clients I can move on up to level 5, and ideally I would like to work as a solo therapist from a home studio. Either in a separate studio in a garden or in a spare room (in process of buying my first home).

I’m really nervous about leaving my lucrative career to start at the bottom, though. Friends in the industry have said how fulfilling it is and that making the leap would be great for me, but then I just feel like I might be throwing my life away.

Has anyone else done similar? I’d really like to hear if you have, and what difficulties you faced.
 

#2
Well, at least you should have an advantage in knowing how to market your services. I had a similar career change (from film & tv admin to beauty) and, while it's not all been smooth sailing, I'm now doing something that gives me a lot of satisfaction. I now train a lot of people that are also making a career change, often much later than you, some are forced through redundancy but most are following a desire to fulfil themselves.

You are certainly not throwing your life away but you may have doubts about giving up a regular paycheque, especially if you are buying a house.
If your job will allow you to take time out to train, this will make for an easier transition. It will take longer than you think to build skill, confidence and a client list. I would strongly advise concentrating on an area that really interests you. Don't do a lot of things at a mediocre level. You get maximum satisfaction from doing something to the best of your ability and if you are going to become a really good Microblading Artist it will need time, dedication and hard work. The rewards are definitely there if you're willing to go all in.
 

Elohelay

New Member
#3
Well, at least you should have an ...
Thanks for responding, it's great to hear from someone who has done the same. I've just found out I am being made redundant, so I am going to try and focus on doing the training, then start looking for a part-time job so that I can keep a good income for a while, whilst I am building up clients and skill. I don't necessarily feel apprehensive about my abilities to market my services, but I do worry about building up clients in a market that is bursting to the seams. I specifically wanted to focus on microblading first because it is something that I think I can pick up clients with, and then build out my skills in skin care. I'm most worried about where I will practice -- without a home of my own, I can't work from home, and if I go into a salon then I am just working for someone else again, which I really don't want to do.

How long did it take for you? For it to become a profitable career choice?
 

#4
Thanks for responding, it's great to hear from someone who has done the same. I've just found out I am being made redundant, so I am going to try and focus on doing the training, then start looking for a part-time job so that I can keep a good income for a while, whilst I am building up clients and skill. I don't necessarily feel apprehensive about my abilities to market my services, but I do worry about building up clients in a market that is bursting to the seams. I specifically wanted to focus on microblading first because it is something that I think I can pick up clients with, and then build out my skills in skin care. I'm most worried about where I will practice -- without a home of my own, I can't work from home, and if I go into a salon then I am just working for someone else again, which I really don't want to do.

How long did it take for you? For it to become a profitable career choice?
I, personally, started some years ago and didn't go straight into microblading. I started out with an eyelash extension company and then fell in love with microblading. You'll have to give serious thought to where you're going to do this as you'll need to licence both yourself and the premises in London. Taking the experience of the students from all over the world who have successfully trained with us, I don't think anyone has established themselves and become profitable in less than six months. After a year you should be a lot more comfortable with the technique and gaining a nice income from top-ups and referals. The temptation, in the first few months, is to reduce prices and try and fight it out with the cheaper end of the market but, our graduates that have really nailed it have held their nerve and built a strong reputation. They work less but earn and enjoy more.
 

#5
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