What are some good ice breakers for getting to know new clients?

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Jenna_Rose020

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Hey there!

Random question. What are some good ice breakers when seeing a new client? I’m trying to build up my clientele a bit more and for me, it seems like when I connect with the client it’s an all around better experience! What are some good topics you talk to new clients about? Sometimes meeting a new client you’ve never spoke with before can be a bit awkward at first (or maybe it’s me lol). Random ones I use are what are you up to today? When’s the last time you’ve gotten your nails done? Are you getting this done for a special occasion?

Does anyone else have any good topics/ice breakers to get to know their new clients?
 

CFBS

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You could say:
(On their first arrival) - Did you find me / the salon ok?
Meeting & greeting:
- were the roads busy/quiet today
- did you manage to park ok today?
- have you just come from work....was it busy for you?
Once into the treatment and you've checked their details / requirements you can move onto topics such as what line of work they are in, children, grandchildren, forthcoming trips, their health, how they found lockdown, future trips, netflix series, recent cinema trips, gardening, that sort of thing.

You'll learn a lot from their consultation at the start, this will gives clues into the sort of lifestyle they might have and therefore what topics interest them.

If the client is about to go on a holiday, write down their destination on their card so next time they come in you can go straight into "How was xxxx". That will keep them talking for quite a while and on to other related chat.

Traditionally, keep off Religion, Money and Politics!!! :)
 

Cerise R

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CFBS, excellent
clothing is great too... "I love the colors of your scarf, what a lovely texture"
"your purse is so cute!"

it can take a while for some clients to warm up but, the ability to have them relaxed, is a great part of the service
so many women have few people who actually listen to them
so often, everyone wants something from them

for us to let them talk about what interests them, can be as much of a treat as a new nail color
 

gc2233

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Number 1 rule
Just be yourself
Fake interest is sooo obvious to a client and can make for an uncomfortable appointment.
You can tell from the get go if your client wants to chat or not. Some people do idle chit chat some people don’t. Sometimes people are interested more on what you all talk about in the staff room, what’s the gossip, what’s going on in the area you are, pubs shops etc read local online news and your magazines in the salon or gossip mags for all the celeb gossip.
others will love you talking about what’s happening in the news - I always feel people will talk about politics as a lot are very passionate about it just don’t slate a particular view and ask their point of view and ask questions if you don’t know what they are talking about, don’t be afraid to ask, we all learn from each other. Some people like this type of conversation much more than chit chat about the weather. Read local news, read world news if you don’t know much about it.
but again if you’ve no interest in something yourself it won’t come across as genuine and may seem to the client your trying to hard.
hairdressing is a fun job where if you make a connection with someone you will hear their secrets, their stresses, their moans and groans and all about their family dramas. I’ve had clients that we’ve laughed until we are crying and others that are very sensible and somber in comparison.
you won’t get a connection with everyone you meet so just be yourself and don’t forget that giving the client information about their hair what styles are current, what new products are out are your main focus to give the client the best out of your services.
 

Alpenrose

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Please don't ask "where are you from?" question if the conversation doesn't go in that direction.
As a white foreigner in the UK, with strong accent, I can tell that 9 out of 10 times this is very off-putting when the conversation starts with this question and most of the time completely inappropriate.
 

gc2233

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Please don't ask "where are you from?" question if the conversation doesn't go in that direction.
As a white foreigner in the UK, with strong accent, I can tell that 9 out of 10 times this is very off-putting when the conversation starts with this question and most of the time completely inappropriate.
Really interesting to hear your view
And I’m now hoping I haven’t upset anyone in asking that question as I do all the time. But we say where are you from? mostly meaning where do you live? I.e city/village not relating to any nationality and it’s a general question asked to everyone. it always comes from a place of interest and to gain common ground and a connection.
Stereotyping or assuming someones background is rude as I find it rude when people assume mine.
Also from a technical point of view when chemically treating its always good to know wether you are dealing with Asian hair as it is generally speaking much stronger - although 9times out 10 you would have a good idea and not need to ask its always best not to assume.
 

Alpenrose

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Really interesting to hear your view
And I’m now hoping I haven’t upset anyone in asking that question as I do all the time. But we say where are you from? mostly meaning where do you live? I.e city/village not relating to any nationality and it’s a general question asked to everyone. it always comes from a place of interest and to gain common ground and a connection.
Stereotyping or assuming someones background is rude as I find it rude when people assume mine.
Also from a technical point of view when chemically treating its always good to know wether you are dealing with Asian hair as it is generally speaking much stronger - although 9times out 10 you would have a good idea and not need to ask its always best not to assume.
They do mean "where you are originally from?" - I know for sure as I usually reply "from Colindale", as this is where I've been living for the past 12 years or "from London" if I am travelling. And every single time follows "no, mean where you are originally from?" It happens in a corner shop when I buy a pack of crisps, at a car wash when I am about to pay, in dry cleaners, the list goes on. Although, it I recognize that this information is important when treating hair and maybe skin, 9 out of 10 times it comes out of blue and is absolutely irrelevant. Also, I find people of colour rarely get that question - and get surprised when I tell them I get it all the time. Food for thought.
For me, this is an ice builder, not breaker.
 

Kyralouise

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Really interesting to hear your view
And I’m now hoping I haven’t upset anyone in asking that question as I do all the time. But we say where are you from? mostly meaning where do you live? I.e city/village not relating to any nationality and it’s a general question asked to everyone. it always comes from a place of interest and to gain common ground and a connection.
Stereotyping or assuming someones background is rude as I find it rude when people assume mine.
Also from a technical point of view when chemically treating its always good to know wether you are dealing with Asian hair as it is generally speaking much stronger - although 9times out 10 you would have a good idea and not need to ask its always best not to assume.
I usually word it "are you local?" so it can't come off offensive. Then followed up with "have you lived in xxx your whole life?"
 

gc2233

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They do mean "where you are originally from?" - I know for sure as I usually reply "from Colindale", as this is where I've been living for the past 12 years or "from London" if I am travelling. And every single time follows "no, mean where you are originally from?" It happens in a corner shop when I buy a pack of crisps, at a car wash when I am about to pay, in dry cleaners, the list goes on. Although, it I recognize that this information is important when treating hair and maybe skin, 9 out of 10 times it comes out of blue and is absolutely irrelevant. Also, I find people of colour rarely get that question - and get surprised when I tell them I get it all the time. Food for thought.
For me, this is an ice builder, not breaker.
I get it totally and whilst not on the same level/vibe obviously have the same questions asked to me daily because of my regional accent being so different so can sympathise with your annoyance.
but from a hairdressing point of view a hairdresser gaining knowledge about a client is getting to know them and then you can and feel more confident in your hair suggestions. Gaining lifestyle knowledge about a client is a huge part of a consultation. So whilst general chit chat and light conversations fill the time and may seem pointless even intrusive at first, really you are gaining knowledge, finding out about the person and getting to know them on a deeper level than your shop attendant etc would ever need to.Ultimately we are there to do a job and perform that task to the best of our ability with professionalism.
But agree wording is important and this is thought provoking.
 

BeckyS

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Hey there!

Random question. What are some good ice breakers when seeing a new client? I’m trying to build up my clientele a bit more and for me, it seems like when I connect with the client it’s an all around better experience! What are some good topics you talk to new clients about? Sometimes meeting a new client you’ve never spoke with before can be a bit awkward at first (or maybe it’s me lol). Random ones I use are what are you up to today? When’s the last time you’ve gotten your nails done? Are you getting this done for a special occasion?

Does anyone else have any good topics/ice breakers to get to know their new clients?
I quite like “What are you having for tea?” Everyone eats, and it’s a good way of getting meal ideas 🤣👍🏼 Xx
 

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