What do we all think of Next selling Elemis and Dermalogica?

#1
Hello all ,
I just wanted everyone’s opinions on Next now selling Elemis and Dermalogica , 2 so called Professional brands ! . In my opinion this now makes a mockery of the therapists and professionals who train hard for years in order to give the best skin advice and individual consultations on the products and what would be best for the client . You can now go online and pick up your cleanser , treatment cream etc with your jeans ! Where is this industry headed ??? X
 

Sinem

New Member
#2
Hi,
I had no idea that was the case, this is so unfair quite disappointing tbh.
 

rubywoo

Active Member
#3
I think it was sadly all too predictable, common business practise. As soon as Jane Wurwand sold Dermalogica we began to watch the brand as a retail education exercise in my salon, as soon as a salon only brand is sold the descent on to the high street begins as a slow trickle, it was initially promised it would only be sold in airports.
 

BannerPenguin

Well-Known Member
#4
I think it was sadly all too predictable, common business practise. As soon as Jane Wurwand sold Dermalogica we began to watch the brand as a retail education exercise in my salon, as soon as a salon only brand is sold the descent on to the high street begins as a slow trickle, it was initially promised it would only be sold in airports.
Why do you think this is? Salons/Therapists not spending enough to keep the business strong enough vs retail sales?
 

rubywoo

Active Member
#5
I don't have a definitive answer to that but my personal opinion is that it's Unilevers modus operandi. They don't seem to have the time or interest in the spa industry but, can see the obvious worth in the brand, it's far more cost efficient and less labour intensive to manufacture and just get it on the shelves. You only have to follow their spa history to paint a brief thumbnail, Dove Spas and The Sanctuary are excellent examples. Running large spa's is labour intensive and I think the main block is now the extremely low standard of training in colleges, which means that unless you are equipped to train new therapists you are in for a bumpy ride. It takes me a year to train new therapists and had I known how bad things were I would never have started a spa I would have opened a college. In the last 20 years whilst trade testing college leavers I have not received a massage that could be considered a Swedish massage and in the last ten years training has taken a deeper dive, it doesn't seem to encompass a sound knowledge of anatomy, not one therapist has been able to name all the superficial muscles of the back when asked or understand the pressure a body needs and how to vary it. I don't know what happened in the beauty training world 20 years ago, but something changed and I've seen a steady erosion ever since. This could of course just be London, as I haven't worked outside the M25 for some time!.

I could go on for hours!!! So I should really stop before I rant you to death.
 

#6
I don't have a definitive answer to that but my personal opinion is that it's Unilevers modus operandi. They don't seem to have the time or interest in the spa industry but, can see the obvious worth in the brand, it's far more cost efficient and less labour intensive to manufacture and just get it on the shelves. You only have to follow their spa history to paint a brief thumbnail, Dove Spas and The Sanctuary are excellent examples. Running large spa's is labour intensive and I think the main block is now the extremely low standard of training in colleges, which means that unless you are equipped to train new therapists you are in for a bumpy ride. It takes me a year to train new therapists and had I known how bad things were I would never have started a spa I would have opened a college. In the last 20 years whilst trade testing college leavers I have not received a massage that could be considered a Swedish massage and in the last ten years training has taken a deeper dive, it doesn't seem to encompass a sound knowledge of anatomy, not one therapist has been able to name all the superficial muscles of the back when asked or understand the pressure a body needs and how to vary it. I don't know what happened in the beauty training world 20 years ago, but something changed and I've seen a steady erosion ever since. This could of course just be London, as I haven't worked outside the M25 for some time!.

I could go on for hours!!! So I should really stop before I rant you to death.
You have so hit the nail on the head, you can do 60 hours training and be fully qualified! I was 3 years full time 5 days a week, 28 years ago and still wouldn’t claim I know everything :0/ you can do a day course and then do an online teacher cert and teach!
 

rubywoo

Active Member
#7
My current junior is wonderful, however, her education is a joke!. Her teacher simply plays you tube videos she finds online, whilst she sits on her backside and lets them get on with it, her A&P is non existent, I spend hours every week making sure I'm cramming in all the information she'll need. She's only 16 and the other students are now coming to her for help and guidance and the teacher simply lets her get on with it!!!. Her weekly updates leave me speechless. Not surprisingly, she has now changed her mind about college and wants to do her level 3 as an apprentice!.
 

Noodle

Moderator
Staff member
#8
By the by, I’ve seen Elemis products also being advertised on QVC this morning.
 

B_beauty

New Member
#9
Most people now are reaching for these products, which sadly mean some of the buisness is going down. At my work we've seen a loss of buisness and some clients we have who come in now are ringing up to cancel appointments because they now have a product they can use at home that will give them the same results.
 
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