What LED Wattage is the equivalent to 36W UV?

Perfect-10

Member
Hi Geeks :)

I know there are masses of threads re lamps on here but so many to go through!

I wondered if anyone knows which wattage LED ie 3W 6W or 12W is the equivalent in output to a 36W UV lamp please?

Called Nubar this morning and they said they don't do a specific branded lamp but recommend that you use a 36W lamp and Gelicure will set using LED as well as long as its the same output as a 36w uv lamp but didn't know which it was!

Any help would be gratefully received :)
 

mum

Well-Known Member
You can't compare the two as they have different wavelengths. The UV wavelength band, though not that wide, does vary. As do all UV tubes. This is why only some UV cured materials will cure under an LED UV. The photointiator in the gel needs to react to it.

You cannot guess if it will cure properly. The manufacturer needs to tell you the exact lamp to use. You haven't been given the correct info by Nubar. If the manufacturer doesn't have a specific LED lamp for the product don't chance it. Use only the one they recommend.
 

Perfect-10

Member
You can't compare the two as they have different wavelengths. The UV wavelength band, though not that wide, does vary. As do all UV tubes. This is why only some UV cured materials will cure under an LED UV. The photointiator in the gel needs to react to it.

You cannot guess if it will cure properly. The manufacturer needs to tell you the exact lamp to use. You haven't been given the correct info by Nubar. If the manufacturer doesn't have a specific LED lamp for the product don't chance it. Use only the one they recommend.

They don't give a brand specific uv lamp either only told any 36w lamp!
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
Hi Geeks :)

Called Nubar this morning and they said they don't do a specific branded lamp but recommend that you use a 36W lamp and Gelicure will set using LED as well as long as its the same output as a 36w uv lamp but didn't know which it was!

Any help would be gratefully received :)
As Mum said, this is nonsense and is a good indication that the person you spoke to doesn't understand the products or LED lamps.

LED lamps output UVA at a narrow range of wavelengths. If your gel is not matched to this it either won't cure, or will take a much longer time to cure. Most 3rd party LED lamps cure at a wavelength range of 400-420nm, while most gel polishes require a wavelength of 360 - 380 nm.

Apart from that, the light intensity, reflectors, distance from bulbs to nails all have an impact on if the lamp is suitable.

The amount of time LED lamps save is not so very much when you analyze it. Most LED lamps can't cure a full hand because they do not have the LED's on sides, but only on the top. Having no LED's on the side means they won't properly cure the thumbs when trying to cure a full hand. That's because LED light is very directional, unlike traditional UV bulbs where reflectors play an important part in bouncing light onto all nail surfaces.

While companies claim 30 second cures with UV lamps, for many this is only for light colors. Darker colors require 60 seconds.

Compare the time for both systems:

LED
====
4 fingers + 4 fingers + 2 thumbs. Applying base, color, color, top coats in each sequence. 3 cures per coat (4) means 12 cures. 12 x average of 45 seconds = 9 minutes total cure time.

UV lamp
======
one hand + one hand. Applying base, color, color, top coats in each sequence. 2 cures per coat (4) means 8 cures. 8 x average of 120 seconds = 16 minutes total cure time.

Is 7 minutes per service worth the cost of an LED lamp? I'd suggest most techs can easily save 7 minutes by talking less to the clients and improving the speed of their technique ;-)
 

mum

Well-Known Member
Great reply Mr Bob :biggrin:
 

Perfect-10

Member
As Mum said, this is nonsense and is a good indication that the person you spoke to doesn't understand the products or LED lamps.

LED lamps output UVA at a narrow range of wavelengths. If your gel is not matched to this it either won't cure, or will take a much longer time to cure. Most 3rd party LED lamps cure at a wavelength range of 400-420nm, while most gel polishes require a wavelength of 360 - 380 nm.

Apart from that, the light intensity, reflectors, distance from bulbs to nails all have an impact on if the lamp is suitable.

The amount of time LED lamps save is not so very much when you analyze it. Most LED lamps can't cure a full hand because they do not have the LED's on sides, but only on the top. Having no LED's on the side means they won't properly cure the thumbs when trying to cure a full hand. That's because LED light is very directional, unlike traditional UV bulbs where reflectors play an important part in bouncing light onto all nail surfaces.

While companies claim 30 second cures with UV lamps, for many this is only for light colors. Darker colors require 60 seconds.

Compare the time for both systems:

LED
====
4 fingers + 4 fingers + 2 thumbs. Applying base, color, color, top coats in each sequence. 3 cures per coat (4) means 12 cures. 12 x average of 45 seconds = 9 minutes total cure time.

UV lamp
======
one hand + one hand. Applying base, color, color, top coats in each sequence. 2 cures per coat (4) means 8 cures. 8 x average of 120 seconds = 16 minutes total cure time.

Is 7 minutes per service worth the cost of an LED lamp? I'd suggest most techs can easily save 7 minutes by talking less to the clients and improving the speed of their technique ;-)

Tab k u for this after reading this I have said sod the LED and il stick with UV and have ordered more bulbs!
Only thing I would say is I have to do my thumbs separate even though my lamps have bulbs on the side as I find they don't cure properly??the only issue I have with the uv bulbs is how do u know when they aren't working properly un till u realise after doing a few clients and they are getting peeling of product?
Is there a way to test them bob?
 

NancySyd

Well-Known Member
As Mum said, this is nonsense and is a good indication that the person you spoke to doesn't understand the products or LED lamps.

LED lamps output UVA at a narrow range of wavelengths. If your gel is not matched to this it either won't cure, or will take a much longer time to cure. Most 3rd party LED lamps cure at a wavelength range of 400-420nm, while most gel polishes require a wavelength of 360 - 380 nm.

Apart from that, the light intensity, reflectors, distance from bulbs to nails all have an impact on if the lamp is suitable.

The amount of time LED lamps save is not so very much when you analyze it. Most LED lamps can't cure a full hand because they do not have the LED's on sides, but only on the top. Having no LED's on the side means they won't properly cure the thumbs when trying to cure a full hand. That's because LED light is very directional, unlike traditional UV bulbs where reflectors play an important part in bouncing light onto all nail surfaces.
While I agree that the person she spoke to didn't understand the issue, I don't think this is accurate either. UV light ends at 400nm; anything above is visible light. Most LED UV lamps emit between 370-380nm which is within the upper range of UV light. CFL UV lamps emit between 315 and 400nm. The difference is simple - CFL lamps emit a broader range of light for a longer period; LED UV lamps emit a more intense but focused range of light for a shorter period. Furthermore, wattage is a measurement of power usage, not light output.

I also think that the newer LED UV lamps eliminate your concern about a five finger cure. Both the new OPI and Gelish lamps do a full hand cure in 30 seconds. I have the Gelish 18g and it does a five finger cure in 30 seconds even of the darkest colours like Bella's Vampire and Black Shadow. It's a great lamp actually.
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
You are of course correct that at 400 nm the light is not UV but visible. Hence the risk that some gel polishes can cure under standard florescent lights. However, I rather thought I'd given enough info for one sitting and decided not to also discuss the light spectrum.

I did say "most 3rd party LED lamps". I am aware of Harmony's lamp, as well as the new Young Nails lamp. I was referring to the no-name LED lamps, of which there are many types as you know.

CFL lamps are interesting. But more interesting would be the CFL + LED hybrid lamps also now coming available.

My overriding point remains true. LED lamps are not a useful investment for most techs. They don't cure their hard or other soak-off gels, the time saving is negligible compared to the time they can save by talking less and improving their technique. Plus most techs don't have end to end clients every day - so arguably they lose quite a few hours between customers.

The price of LED lamps that do cure in the 360-380nm range will fall dramatically in the coming year as more printers appear that use the same LED's and that increased manufacturing volume will drop the LED lamp prices.
 

NancySyd

Well-Known Member
I disagree a bit. I think that there is a difference in the decision making based on whether you're an established tech using a variety of products or, on the opposite extreme, whether you're starting fresh and intend to maintain a more narrow range of services. LED UV is the trend of the future and I doubt that many products from now on will be developed for CFL UV only. The cost of bulbs is not insignificant, not to mention the fall-off in effectiveness of CFL UV bulbs. Plus, the cost of good quality name brand LED UV units is beginning to come down.

Obviously a cost-effective dual CFL/LED lamp would be ideal, but I haven't seen one although they've been rumoured for months.
 
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