When to give up on a stylist, after 3 weeks?

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#1
Hi dolls .....very long winded post ahead!

Ok so 3 -4 weeks ago I took on a new stylist. 3 days per week.
Colour & cut trade test was performed, on my clients x3 -all very well executed and clients were really happy with the work and her personality fit in great!

(Her personal circumstances have changed somewhat since the trade test and I'm unsure if her head is bamboozled )

I've had to go on maternity leave due to serious health reasons, so haven't been as 'present' as I would like.

The issue is that we have had 3 clients unhappy in that short time.
In my salon I do not allow mediocre work leave the building! And this has cost me hundreds already!!

*1st client (day one of employment)- service -Balayage.

My stylist assures me she's competent & the work she shows me in her portfolio is of a good standard ....albeit not to our high standard, but a bit of training with different methods would have increased the quality ten fold.

While doing the colour, she was flustered, panicky and rushing (I asked if she was ok and she said yes) the result was utterly terrible, it was patchy and yellow with no blend at all!

Without me saying anything she knew it needed to be rectified. And told me what she was going to do (I semi agreed and gave her another option which she used)

Unfortunately yet again it was patchy due to her missing parts of the hair out
.....the client was lovely and came back the next day (my only day off ) and had it decided by me!

2nd Client (foils) week one

Stylist used 20 in stead of 30 (ignored/didn't read the consultation card) and the roots were really warm!

Couldn't be rectified as the client demanded it done on a certain day and wouldn't work around a very important hospital appointment I had (I'm pregnant with serious complications, which she knows about already)
She went to another salon, but was lovely about it and said she understands it's a training thing and I personally couldn't help it, says she will be back (who knows, she goes to who ever can fit her in on a days notice )

Client 3- full head colour. Today (I'm on maternity)

Now this is a hard one as it's both client and stylists fault (in my eyes)

Client came in for a consultation with myself a few weeks ago, she had a presence of red from a previous colour we done in salon. Client wanted 5.75 and was told she would need to have it stripped. Then coloured so would need to book in via phone. She didn't and booked a full head of colour online with no correction.

Today the stylist took one snippet of information from the consultation and just coloured over the clients hair with a 5.75 and guess what colour it went .........yep vibrant Mahogany!
Client hates it and now will need it totally stripped out! (Client is being lovely)

So my question is: What do I do, swallow the cost as a salon? And re do it free of charge ?

Also what do I do about the new stylist??......., she has a great attitude but honestly I cannot take anymore mistakes!! It's expensive and is losing me the faith of our clients!!

I have another stylist who could help with training but I can't due to health


Hellllllllp me pleeeeeease you lovely lot x
 

#2
I think that even although you told the client to book in by phone and she didn’t, it’s still down to the stylist to do what’s needed correctly which may have meant rescheduling her rather than doing it wrongly, which it was. So I think it’s down to the salon to take care of client costs. As for the new stylist, I think a meeting is necessary, perhaps with a more senior stylist sitting in so everyone understands what’s gone wrong, why it went wrong and how to sort it. Ask the stylist if she knows why she’s making these mistakes? Is there a reason? Or was it just new job nerves? Don’t book her any more colours etc until she’s had a bit more training from you and/or the senior stylist to show her any instructions and observations she should take from consultation cards etc and go through procedures with her. Have her sit in on other staff as on observer when they are colouring, allowing her to read the consultation notes and the senior stylist go through them with her. The new stylist should listen to any consultation and the senior stylist explain to the new stylist what she plans on doing to the clients hair and ask the new stylist if she agrees or disagrees with that to see how much of an understanding she has. Then maybe have her do a couple of models a week to practice/train on until everyone’s satisfied she can do clients.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#3
I think that even although you told the client to book in by phone and she didn’t, it’s still down to the stylist to do what’s needed correctly which may have meant rescheduling her rather than doing it wrongly, which it was. So I think it’s down to the salon to take care of client costs. As for the new stylist, I think a meeting is necessary, perhaps with a more senior stylist sitting in so everyone understands what’s gone wrong, why it went wrong and how to sort it. Ask the stylist if she knows why she’s making these mistakes? Is there a reason? Or was it just new job nerves? Don’t book her any more colours etc until she’s had a bit more training from you and/or the senior stylist to show her any instructions and observations she should take from consultation cards etc and go through procedures with her. Have her sit in on other staff as on observer when they are colouring, allowing her to read the consultation notes and the senior stylist go through them with her. The new stylist should listen to any consultation and the senior stylist explain to the new stylist what she plans on doing to the clients hair and ask the new stylist if she agrees or disagrees with that to see how much of an understanding she has. Then maybe have her do a couple of models a week to practice/train on until everyone’s satisfied she can do clients.
Totally agree that it should be on our head, we get a lot of people booking things incorrectly and have to either refuse to do the service (exceptional circs -such as no skin test) or do what's expected and all work together. Which in this case it's a colour correction.

Silly question, surely im right in thinking it's pretty basic knowledge that red cannot be covered by a 5. ?
Even my assistant questioned her (only started hairdressing in August with me), and was told "no 5.75 is fine"
 

#4
Ah. I am not a hairdresser so can’t comment on basic knowledge or not I’m afraid. But in any case, it sounds like a meeting and plan for training may be required. I’m assuming you’ve seen her qualifications for colouring?
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#5
Sounds like you need to prioritise your health!

Your new stylist is part-time and has only been with you for a very short time.
If she was left alone and working at her own pace would you say she’s fairly competent?
How much salon experience does she have? If it’s not that much, when you add the tighter time pressures and the noisy buzz of a salon, it adds a layer of stress that will take a bit of time to get used to and could be causing her to make rookie errors?

I think you need to cut her some slack and ensure that she only does straightforward colour clients for the next 2-3 weeks to gradually re-build her confidence and get used to your salon atmosphere, particularly as you’re not there to manage her progress. Book the more complex colour services inc. colour corrections in with someone else.

Do you have another stylist who you could promote to oversee the salon generally and specifically to supervise/mentor your new recruit in your absence, so that you’re not constantly worrying about what’s happening in the salon when you’re not there?
(In financial terms, think of it as a short term pain for a long term gain.)

I think even the most experienced hairdressers need a period of settling in when changing jobs, so I wouldn’t write her off just yet.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#6
Sounds like you need to prioritise your health!

Your new stylist is part-time and has only been with you for a very short time.
If she was left alone and working at her own pace would you say she’s fairly competent?
How much salon experience does she have? If it’s not that much, when you add the tighter time pressures and the noisy buzz of a salon, it adds a layer of stress that will take a bit of time to get used to and could be causing her to make rookie errors?

I think you need to cut her some slack and ensure that she only does straightforward colour clients for the next 2-3 weeks to gradually re-build her confidence and get used to your salon atmosphere, particularly as you’re not there to manage her progress. Book the more complex colour services inc. colour corrections in with someone else.

Do you have another stylist who you could promote to oversee the salon generally and specifically to supervise/mentor your new recruit in your absence, so that you’re not constantly worrying about what’s happening in the salon when you’re not there?
(In financial terms, think of it as a short term pain for a long term gain.)

I think even the most experienced hairdressers need a period of settling in when changing jobs, so I wouldn’t write her off just yet.
See this is the issue, she has 6 years salon floor experience! I'm really struggling to understand how she can get highlights wrong.....that's a pretty basic colour service right, Or am I being too hard?

The correction wouldn't have gone in with her it was meant to be with another stylist but the client booked it online so made the mistake, my point is I don't believe she should have carried out the service? What do you think?

No I don't trust her to be on her own unfortunately. I can deffo look at it as a training issue, and assign a more senior staff member to her x
 

Haircutz

Super Moderator
Staff member
#7
Six years salon floor experience, oh my!

From what you’d written, I was assuming she was fairly newly qualified so I think you need to sit and have a 1:1 (review meeting) and ask her how she thinks she’s settling in.
Refer to the recent colour service and ask whether she thought she’d made a mistake? (She might be in denial?)
Ask her what could she do differently next time. See if she understands what went wrong.

Some hairdressers are poorly skilled but compensate by being over confident and refuse to acknowledge errors, blaming others where possible.
They’re the personality types I’d least want working for me.

If she owns up to the error and seems keen to improve, I’d give her another chance and support her with extra training/supervision. She might have been working in a salon that has lower standards and no-one to learn from.

However, I think you have to trust your instinct as you know her and we don’t.
 

BannerPenguin

Well-Known Member
#8
The fact is do you have the time and money to train her? You hired someone with a lot of experience you wouldn’t expect to hand hold them for basic stuff I’d imagine.

If it were me I’d be firing and looking for someone else.

In your situation put yourself first with your health issues. If you leave her to be in the business on her own while you have the time off you need you may not have a business to come back to.

Hire slow, fire fast is my motto.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#9
The fact is do you have the time and money to train her? You hired someone with a lot of experience you wouldn’t expect to hand hold them for basic stuff I’d imagine.

If it were me I’d be firing and looking for someone else.

In your situation put yourself first with your health issues. If you leave her to be in the business on her own while you have the time off you need you may not have a business to come back to.

Hire slow, fire fast is my motto.
Good motto!

Yep I don't have the time to hand hold at all, she's not the only stylist at my salon there's 4 of us now, so they should be able to manage clientele effectivly and maybe contact me when there's an unusual issue.....but as it stands I'm left to deal with basic stuff I shouldn't be called off my maternity for. x
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#10
Six years salon floor experience, oh my!

From what you’d written, I was assuming she was fairly newly qualified so I think you need to sit and have a 1:1 (review meeting) and ask her how she thinks she’s settling in.
Refer to the recent colour service and ask whether she thought she’d made a mistake? (She might be in denial?)
Ask her what could she do differently next time. See if she understands what went wrong.

Some hairdressers are poorly skilled but compensate by being over confident and refuse to acknowledge errors, blaming others where possible.
They’re the personality types I’d least want working for me.

If she owns up to the error and seems keen to improve, I’d give her another chance and support her with extra training/supervision. She might have been working in a salon that has lower standards and no-one to learn from.

However, I think you have to trust your instinct as you know her and we don’t.
She has owned up to it all, and I'm booking a meeting next week. With myself and the manager, thank you so much for your advice.

When I asked why she didn't refuse the colour service or strip it out she said "her hair was faded red so thought it would colour over it "

I think it's down to knowledge rather than laziness, but I just can't be sure
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#11
Hey all. So an update.


After another complaint, I decided to reduce her hours so that she would have someone to guide her while I was off.
On the understanding when I come back from my mahoosive 12 week maternity leave!!! (That btw I feel I haven't had), she would come back.

She was really happy that I have her another chance to freshen up her skills and times.

Now I find out there's been some sh** stirring in the salon with my assistant as she's tremendously upset she wasn't consulted during this decision.(I have no idea where her sense of bloody importance comes from, she's an odd one who I've posted about before......she is the absolute best then does stupid stuff to nearly lose her job!!)

This girl was sick 2 weeks ago (this particular time was genuine) & has text me this morn saying
"got no childcare can't come in sorry"

While I'm on mat leave, so doday due to another stylist at a funeral I've made 0.00 money!

Helpppppppp
 
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BannerPenguin

Well-Known Member
#12
I mean, I know it takes time to find good staff but I'd start ASAP and maybe do some 'easy going' interviewing while you're off. Do you have a cash reserve to keep you going? I'd be looking to sack both of these ASAP. Cutting hours, although I know why you have done it due to your mat leave, won't change her IMO. Gut opinion from what I've read :)
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#13
I mean, I know it takes time to find good staff but I'd start ASAP and maybe do some 'easy going' interviewing while you're off. Do you have a cash reserve to keep you going? I'd be looking to sack both of these ASAP. Cutting hours, although I know why you have done it due to your mat leave, won't change her IMO. Gut opinion from what I've read :)
Totally ... .after speaking to a couple of friends who own salon I've decided to get rid x
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#14
Omg guys YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE my day!

So this girl is sacked but has been stirring the pot with 2x other staff members!

They both walked out today as I told them off for not ordering stock (my stylist ran out of bleach half way through a client!!) And answering client emails!

Omg what is wrong with these millennials? What do they expect.... to be paid to ... Omg could it be WORK?! God forbid?
 

BannerPenguin

Well-Known Member
#15
Omg guys YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE my day!

So this girl is sacked but has been stirring the pot with 2x other staff members!

They both walked out today as I told them off for not ordering stock (my stylist ran out of bleach half way through a client!!) And answering client emails!

Omg what is wrong with these millennials? What do they expect.... to be paid to ... Omg could it be WORK?! God forbid?
What a joke! Feel for you. How is she stirring? If she's sacked did you get her out ASAP? Put her on gardening leave so to speak.
If money allows, seriously consider going back solo. Also, depending on personal circumstances and your life goals, sell up and then restart later date from home in a cabin or something?

Bricks and mortar isn't as profitable as it used to be and nothing wrong with being solo and earning reasonably good money.
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#16
What a joke! Feel for you. How is she stirring? If she's sacked did you get her out ASAP? Put her on gardening leave so to speak.
If money allows, seriously consider going back solo. Also, depending on personal circumstances and your life goals, sell up and then restart later date from home in a cabin or something?

Bricks and mortar isn't as profitable as it used to be and nothing wrong with being solo and earning reasonably good money.[/QUOTE



Yeah I know appalling behaviour, but actually quite funny now I have got all my ducks in order (salon will be fine now they've gone believe it or not)
She was sacked on Saturday I just didn't get chace to tell her ( she failed to turn up for work without a valid excuse)

Thankfully I had a little word with a couple of people who know her (wondered why she looked horrified when we discovered we knew a few of the same people)

They both said steer clear she's trouble, a compulsive liar and rough as old dogs .....

Plus, she was a terrible hairdresser anyway so I'm not missing out.
As for the other two.....meh who cares!

Salon will be fine, I've done the numbers and we are still in profit. Then when I get back (thankfully I can now relax) I can consider my 5 year plan! Thank you though @BannerPenguin
 

redlottie13

JUST BE NICE
#17
Yeah I know appalling behaviour, but actually quite funny now I have got all my ducks in order (salon will be fine now they've gone believe it or not)
She was sacked on Saturday I just didn't get chace to tell her ( she failed to turn up for work without a valid excuse)

Thankfully I had a little word with a couple of people who know her (wondered why she looked horrified when we discovered we knew a few of the same people)

They both said steer clear she's trouble, a compulsive liar and rough as old dogs .....

Plus, she was a terrible hairdresser anyway so I'm not missing out.
As for the other two.....meh who cares!

Salon will be fine, I've done the numbers and we are still in profit. Then when I get back (thankfully I can now relax) I can consider my 5 year plan! Thank you though @BannerPenguin[/QUOTE]
 

BannerPenguin

Well-Known Member
#18
Yeah I know appalling behaviour, but actually quite funny now I have got all my ducks in order (salon will be fine now they've gone believe it or not)
She was sacked on Saturday I just didn't get chace to tell her ( she failed to turn up for work without a valid excuse)

Thankfully I had a little word with a couple of people who know her (wondered why she looked horrified when we discovered we knew a few of the same people)

They both said steer clear she's trouble, a compulsive liar and rough as old dogs .....

Plus, she was a terrible hairdresser anyway so I'm not missing out.
As for the other two.....meh who cares!

Salon will be fine, I've done the numbers and we are still in profit. Then when I get back (thankfully I can now relax) I can consider my 5 year plan! Thank you though @BannerPenguin
[/QUOTE]
Super glad to hear you've got all your bases covered! I'm sure it's a weight off your shoulders that you can now breath and take relax on your mat leave and take your time re-hiring should you want to and when the times right :)
 
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