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Leaving notice and a contract

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Lulupoo12345

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hello again :) I'm new to here still trying to get used to it all, I don't know if I officially have a contract or not. My boss showed me a contract once that was unfilled (she just told me rather then filling it out) and said that I need to abide by it, although I have never signed anything and was never given a contract to take home. So do I legally have one? I am thinking of leaving soon and would appreciate any advice on how much notice I need to give. Xx
 

PamieD

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How were you paid and were you given payslips? Also how long have you been working there? It's usually about 2 weeks notice, but if you have no statement of employment (not necessarily a contract, just a bit of paper saying what your job requirements are) then your employer has broken the law, and you can actually just walk out any time.
 

Lulupoo12345

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hello thank you for your reply and yes I have payslips and I get paid monthly X
 

Lulupoo12345

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How were you paid and were you given payslips? Also how long have you been working there? It's usually about 2 weeks notice, but if you have no statement of employment (not necessarily a contract, just a bit of paper saying what your job requirements are) then your employer has broken the law, and you can actually just walk out any time.
And I have been there 4 years x
 

PamieD

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Oh dear, well you definitely have a contract and she's broken the law by not at least scribbling down your duties and terms of contract. There's no way around this, if you know what day you're leaving then hand in your notice with that date. If you don't know then I would ask her for a copy of your contract and see what she says. Do you think she deliberately didn't give you a copy or could it have slipped her mind?
 

Lulupoo12345

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Oh dear, well you definitely have a contract and she's broken the law by not at least scribbling down your duties and terms of contract. There's no way around this, if you know what day you're leaving then hand in your notice with that date. If you don't know then I would ask her for a copy of your contract and see what she says. Do you think she deliberately didn't give you a copy or could it have slipped her mind?
I think it might of just slipped her mind, so do I still give her 2 weeks notice.? Thanks a lot for your help
 

PamieD

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Well 2 weeks is common but legally you actually only have to give 1 weeks notice. If you're ready to leave now then yes I'd say write a letter with 2 weeks notice, but if you're not then I'd ask her how much is needed.
 

IBUK

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Your contract will more likely state 4 weeks so ask for a copy I say. 4 weeks is the normal required after 4 years of work.
 

squidgernetball

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If you have been well looked after, except for a contract, then give her as much notice as you can. Without a contract, how you have worked becomes the terms of your employment. It is often accepted that the frequency of pay determines the length of notice given, so if you're paid monthly, you give a months notice.

Vic x
 

Lulupoo12345

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Ok thanks all for your help :) xxx
 

Paige@TheClinik

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If you have been well looked after, except for a contract, then give her as much notice as you can. Without a contract, how you have worked becomes the terms of your employment. It is often accepted that the frequency of pay determines the length of notice given, so if you're paid monthly, you give a months notice.

Vic x
Agreed, please respect the fact that the salon owner has to find a replacement at short notice.
Xx
 

PamieD

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The salon owner didn't give her a copy of her contract and is lucky not to be paying a fine for it.
 

squidgernetball

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The salon owner didn't give her a copy of her contract and is lucky not to be paying a fine for it.
But it may have been an oversight. How you're treated in a working environment is far more important than whether your contract is all in order x
 

PamieD

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And that's why we've got rules like this, to avoid confusion and awkwardness. She has been put into this position of posting on a forum because she wasn't given her terms of employment. It works both ways.
 

surf girl

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Some employers have a handbook in the salon which is the contract I'm guessing this is one of those
 

Lulupoo12345

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Yes that's it x
 

surf girl

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Well then you are in a contract if that's the case
 

Lulupoo12345

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thank yu for your help
 

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