Burning sensation in lamp

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JoyDoesNails

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Does anybody know why I experience a painful quick burning sensation almost as soon as I put my nails in the lamp? What’s weird is it doesn’t hurt to cure the base coat or the color I choose, it’s just the top coat that burns really bad! I appreciate any advice

(I’m talking about a basic gel manicure, not acrylics).
 

NancySyd

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Sounds like heat spike. What system are you using?
 

JoyDoesNails

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NancySyd

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I use a cnc top coat and everything else is dnd
Well, that's the start of the problem. CND Shellac is not supposed to be used with other systems. What are you using to cure with? Are you a qualified salon professional?
 

JoyDoesNails

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Sounds like heat spike. What system are you using?
I use a dnd top coat
Well, that's the start of the problem. CND Shellac is not supposed to be used with other systems. What are you using to cure with? Are you a qualified salon professional?
ok. I use a sun uv lamp from Amazon. There’s no specific company name on it. I am not a licensed nail tech yet, just a beginner!
 

Louise Hankinson

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Hi
In my training we were told that your layers are to thick ...however when using a lamp with a fan inside it it doesnt happen ...
Apparently its a molecule overload and they are fighting to lay down but when theirs to many they have no room to lay down this then causes friction among them hence the burn x
 

Trinity

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Hi
In my training we were told that your layers are to thick ...however when using a lamp with a fan inside it it doesnt happen ...
Apparently its a molecule overload and they are fighting to lay down but when theirs to many they have no room to lay down this then causes friction among them hence the burn x
It's called an exothermic reaction, quite common with newbies and gel, however, more concerning when somis mixing and matching incorrect products and lamps.

Even more concerning when an untrained person is doing it completely unaware of the host of potential issues
 

JoyDoesNails

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Hi
In my training we were told that your layers are to thick ...however when using a lamp with a fan inside it it doesnt happen ...
Apparently its a molecule overload and they are fighting to lay down but when theirs to many they have no room to lay down this then causes friction among them hence the burn x
Ok. Interesting, thank you for the response! I wish my school taught me about this.
 

JoyDoesNails

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It's called an exothermic reaction, quite common with newbies and gel, however, more concerning when somis mixing and matching incorrect products and lamps.

Even more concerning when an untrained person is doing it completely unaware of the host of potential issues
I went to school but they didn’t teach me about this. I’ll just quit then? Gees lol
 

Trinity

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I went to school but they didn’t teach me about this. I’ll just quit then? Gees lol
Get back in touch with your training provider and get a refund, any decent training course will teach you the basics, and product chemistry is basics, as is allergy risks caused by mismatched products, heat spikes and not mixing and matching products. The risks to you and your clients are horrendous.

I thought the USA Nail qualifications were extremely long hours and very detailed, I'm very surprised to hear you had bad training
 

Trinity

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I went to school but they didn’t teach me about this. I’ll just quit then? Gees lol
You should also read this Pinned Post at the top of the Nails Forum

 

JoyDoesNails

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Get back in touch with your training provider and get a refund, any decent training course will teach you the basics, and product chemistry is basics, as is allergy risks caused by mismatched products, heat spikes and not mixing and matching products. The risks to you and your clients are horrendous.

I thought the USA Nail qualifications were extremely long hours and very detailed, I'm very surprised to hear you had bad training
Yep, 600 hours and I graduated but my teachers were horrible. Appreciate the feedback
 

NancySyd

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I went to school but they didn’t teach me about this. I’ll just quit then? Gees lol
Pay attention to absolutely everything that Trinity says! She has hit the nail on the head. It is good that you recognized the shortcomings in your training and sought guidance. You do need to quit until you have been properly trained and educated yourself about these products.
 

Trinity

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Yep, 600 hours and I graduated but my teachers were horrible. Appreciate the feedback
Genuine question, over here in the UK we don't have those 'requirements' - what did they teach you in 600 hours?

I'm trying to get my head around how it works. 600 hours at 8 hours a day, 5 days a week is 15 weeks. So is it a full time course for 15 weeks? Or blocks of weeks or as and when you can fit it in around life/work?? 600 hours is a lot of time to not cover the basics they appear to have ignored.

@NancySyd - how does it work???? 🤓 🤗
 

Amber5748

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Where did you buy the CND products you are using? You are supposed to be a trained nail tech and send them copies of your certificates before you can buy CND products.
 

Trinity

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Where did you buy the CND products you are using? You are supposed to be a trained nail tech and send them copies of your certificates before you can buy CND products.
Only in the UK @Amber5748 they're not so restricted in the USA. You used to be able to buy CND products in the Chemists over there without certificates, not sure if you still can. Plus you can buy CND from eBay, etc. you don't know for sure it's not fake, etc. but it's certainly available freely from unauthorised sellers on lots of websites.
 

NancySyd

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Genuine question, over here in the UK we don't have those 'requirements' - what did they teach you in 600 hours?

I'm trying to get my head around how it works. 600 hours at 8 hours a day, 5 days a week is 15 weeks. So is it a full time course for 15 weeks? Or blocks of weeks or as and when you can fit it in around life/work?? 600 hours is a lot of time to not cover the basics they appear to have ignored.

@NancySyd - how does it work???? 🤓 🤗
Here it is state by state. Some states have little in the way of regulation, some have a lot, but few have much in the way of enforcement. For my state, Massachusetts, Manicurist-Type 3 license, you have to have a month long, 100 hours+ training program and pass a 90 minutes written exam (offered in English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Portuguese, or Vietnamese), plus a 90 minute practical exam. Additionally, we separately license salons as well, so to set up shop here, you need both your manicurist license and a salon license or work for someone who has the salon license.

There are few products that an DIYer can't get since there is no statute regulating products. There are a lot of fake products out there, especially OPI, so it's easy for a DIYer to end up with counterfeit products. Some stores, like SalonCentric or CosmoProf, you can't even enter without showing your license, some will only sell you certain things without a license. I only buy from authorized sellers. My license expired about 8 years ago and I still go to the same shop I've always gone to with no problems (I use mostly OPI GelColours and CND products, with an occasional LeChat, Cuccio, or Gelish thrown in); perhaps it's because they know me, but I've never seen them ask anyone for their license.
 

Trinity

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Here it is state by state. Some states have little in the way of regulation, some have a lot, but few have much in the way of enforcement. For my state, Massachusetts, Manicurist-Type 3 license, you have to have a month long, 100 hours+ training program and pass a 90 minutes written exam (offered in English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Portuguese, or Vietnamese), plus a 90 minute practical exam. Additionally, we separately license salons as well, so to set up shop here, you need both your manicurist license and a salon license or work for someone who has the salon license.

There are few products that an DIYer can't get since there is no statute regulating products. There are a lot of fake products out there, especially OPI, so it's easy for a DIYer to end up with counterfeit products. Some stores, like SalonCentric or CosmoProf, you can't even enter without showing your license, some will only sell you certain things without a license. I only buy from authorized sellers. My license expired about 8 years ago and I still go to the same shop I've always gone to with no problems (I use mostly OPI GelColours and CND products, with an occasional LeChat, Cuccio, or Gelish thrown in); perhaps it's because they know me, but I've never seen them ask anyone for their license.
Thanks @NancySyd - it's very interesting, there are some similarities and some massive differences. We have virtually no enforcement, some on the London Boroughs are starting to insist on NVQ's for Salons but I'm not sure they're as strict with homebased and mobile techs. Each individual County has its own council and they set their own rules, so there's no consistency across the country. Add to that the fact that many don't bother to register and work legally, or pay tax, etc. it's a bit of a free for all.

Marian Newman and some other industry leaders are launching The Federation of Nail Professionals imminently so there's some light at the end of the tunnel. That said, be careful what you wish for! 🤪 🤓
 

Haircutz

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My license expired about 8 years ago and I still go to the same shop I've always gone to with no problems.
Thank you for explaining how it works in your State. I find it fascinating to learn how other countries run their training and operational requirements.

May I ask, how long does a licence last and how do you renew it?

At the moment, in the U.K., if you are qualified to a recognised level here (NVQ, VRQ, etc.) there is no expiry date so you could have trained 10 years ago and not worked at all since and still be allowed to set up in business and obtain insurance. :eek:

In hairdressing, there is a lot of encouragement for hairdressers to continue learning with additional short courses to keep up to date with industry developments but it’s not mandatory, which I think it should be.
 

NancySyd

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Thank you for explaining how it works in your State. I find it fascinating to learn how other countries run their training and operational requirements.

May I ask, how long does a licence last and how do you renew it?

At the moment, in the U.K., if you are qualified to a recognised level here (NVQ, VRQ, etc.) there is no expiry date so you could have trained 10 years ago and not worked at all since and still be allowed to set up in business and obtain insurance. :eek:

In hairdressing, there is a lot of encouragement for hairdressers to continue learning with additional short courses to keep up to date with industry developments but it’s not mandatory, which I think it should be.
License is good for two years, and to renew it, you really just have to send in the form and fee.
 
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