Guidelines for beauty therapists after lockdown?

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Tinkerbell
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Hi everyone, I’m wondering what everyone’s thoughts are on doing certain treatments when we go back after lockdown?
I’m really worried about massage. The salon rooms are quite small (enough to fit a massage table and sink in and that’s about it) and the thought of massaging a client for an hour in that enclosed space fills me with trepidation.
I’m also worried about facials - the thought of having to wear a mask & gloves and sit at the clients head for an hour working on their face.... I wonder how safe that will be?
Then there’s waxing - I wonder how that will work? Will we still do intimate waxing, or facial waxing?

I hear the government talking about hair salons and beauty salons opening at the same time and I just wonder if they’re actually taking into account how intimate our job as Beauty Therapists is to the client - with the close contact, possible sweating clients, warm enclosed often small salon rooms and length of time we are in the room for.
Does anyone know what the guidelines are for Beauty Therapists going back to work?
If we work for an employer can we refuse to do a treatment if we’re not comfortable with it?
Does anyone have any thoughts?
Sorry for the long post - it’s just been on my mind a lot so thought I’d ask.
Thanks x
 

Noodle

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Check out similar threads currently running in our Business forum for plenty of advice, and welcome to Salon Geek too.
 

Ruthie67

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Hello there, I’m a Beauty Therapist now working from 1 room at home and feel exactly the same as you do. The more I do the online sanitisation courses and read everything we need to do, the more worried I’m getting!
We seem to be considered the same as hairdressers and we’re SO different in that we actually work closely face to face with our clients (rather than the back of the head and only touching the hair), and actually touch their faces... I have all the PPE I think I’ll need but it’s still very worrying as clients will be coming into my home and I can’t even go into my elderly mums house!
Hopefully the government will tell us more soon and will guide us as to which treatments are safest to do. Like you I’m concerned about facials, facial waxing and lash treatments when we spend long periods of time leaning over the clients face and are really close... obviously we can wear a mask and visor but they can’t if we’re working on their faces!
Also,waxing ... I still use the traditional method of waxing changing my spatula for each area of the body and each client... am I going to be able to wax still?
Most of my clients are older, so does that mean they’re advised not to come? Yet another concern of mine ....x
 

Adamsbarbers

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Hi,
I'm hoping we can lend a hand with some of the PPE requirements. If you have any questions about finding quality products and which to use do let us know and hopefully we can help you out.
 

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Tinkerbell
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Check out similar threads currently running in our Business forum for plenty of advice, and welcome to Salon Geek too.
Hi Noodle, and thanks for the reply. To be honest, I would have preferred if the thread had stayed in the skin section I initially put it in.
I have read the other threads regarding this particular concern but most of the comments are from people who are running their own business. I was really trying to gauge the mood of people who are employed, and what their concerns were.
I’ve run my own business in the past and I know & understand the concerns of business owners. This was more a general question for all Beauty Therapists - many of whom won’t visit the business section of your forum.
Thanks
 

Noodle

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Hi Noodle, and thanks for the reply. To be honest, I would have preferred if the thread had stayed in the skin section I initially put it in.
I have read the other threads regarding this particular concern but most of the comments are from people who are running their own business. I was really trying to gauge the mood of people who are employed, and what their concerns were.
I’ve run my own business in the past and I know & understand the concerns of business owners. This was more a general question for all Beauty Therapists - many of whom won’t visit the business section of your forum.
Thanks
No problem, your thread has been returned to the Skin forum ;)
 

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Tinkerbell
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Hello there, I’m a Beauty Therapist now working from 1 room at home and feel exactly the same as you do. The more I do the online sanitisation courses and read everything we need to do, the more worried I’m getting!
We seem to be considered the same as hairdressers and we’re SO different in that we actually work closely face to face with our clients (rather than the back of the head and only touching the hair), and actually touch their faces... I have all the PPE I think I’ll need but it’s still very worrying as clients will be coming into my home and I can’t even go into my elderly mums house!
Hopefully the government will tell us more soon and will guide us as to which treatments are safest to do. Like you I’m concerned about facials, facial waxing and lash treatments when we spend long periods of time leaning over the clients face and are really close... obviously we can wear a mask and visor but they can’t if we’re working on their faces!
Also,waxing ... I still use the traditional method of waxing changing my spatula for each area of the body and each client... am I going to be able to wax still?
Most of my clients are older, so does that mean they’re advised not to come? Yet another concern of mine ....x
Hello Ruthie and thanks for your reply. It’s heartening to know others are concerned too about what happens next. I really feel for you with the older clients - if I still had my business it would be a huge concern too. I hope it works out for you. Fingers crossed it’s good guidelines to keep us all safe x

Hi,
I'm hoping we can lend a hand with some of the PPE requirements. If you have any questions about finding quality products and which to use do let us know and hopefully we can help you out.
Thank you - will keep it in mind

No problem, your thread has been returned to the Skin forum ;)
Thank you Noodle. That’s kind of you to understand and I appreciate it. Thanks
 

Katmoz33

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Hello there, I’m a Beauty Therapist now working from 1 room at home and feel exactly the same as you do. The more I do the online sanitisation courses and read everything we need to do, the more worried I’m getting!
We seem to be considered the same as hairdressers and we’re SO different in that we actually work closely face to face with our clients (rather than the back of the head and only touching the hair), and actually touch their faces... I have all the PPE I think I’ll need but it’s still very worrying as clients will be coming into my home and I can’t even go into my elderly mums house!
Hopefully the government will tell us more soon and will guide us as to which treatments are safest to do. Like you I’m concerned about facials, facial waxing and lash treatments when we spend long periods of time leaning over the clients face and are really close... obviously we can wear a mask and visor but they can’t if we’re working on their faces!
Also,waxing ... I still use the traditional method of waxing changing my spatula for each area of the body and each client... am I going to be able to wax still?
Most of my clients are older, so does that mean they’re advised not to come? Yet another concern of mine ....x
I agree with you it’s so hard I worked from home but I have decided to move into a salon to reopen to keep people out of my home. I’m not comfortable with having them in especially when my family is home and I can’t expect my family to wear ppe when I’m working lol
There is a lot to think about, I did think for higher risk clients to have a set time like first thing on a morning when everything is fresh and clean and keep elderly and more vulnerable clients together?
Do u think that would work? Xx
 

blossom

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I agree with you it’s so hard I worked from home but I have decided to move into a salon to reopen to keep people out of my home. I’m not comfortable with having them in especially when my family is home and I can’t expect my family to wear ppe when I’m working lol
There is a lot to think about, I did think for higher risk clients to have a set time like first thing on a morning when everything is fresh and clean and keep elderly and more vulnerable clients together?
Do u think that would work? Xx
In theory it’s a great idea but I can think of quite a few of my oldies who don’t even get up till nearly lunchtime altho others are up with the lark. (Some are on meds and some can’t sleep til like 4am) But yes in theory it could work.

I work from home too and have the same concerns. It’s interesting that you’re moving to a salon. Do you have just one room there? Can I ask if it’s expensive? xx
 

TheDuchess

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Hi all, ok, take all your fears and work through them in a logical order.

Fear One. What about vulnerable people?

Vulnerable people can be put into 3 groups, 1. Those that have been written to by the government to stay indoors - or who feel that they should have received a letter. 2. Those who know they are in a more vulnerable group but not needing a letter and have chosen to stay indoors and get everything delivered. 3. Those who have been advised they fall into a higher risk category and are managing this as best they can, using the dedicated supermarket times and wearing masks when they leave the house.

Personally I don’t think we shouldn’t be suggesting to the shielded group that they can come out for a hair/beauty appointment. The government advice has been that this group should stay home. So if they’ve had a letter, or feel they should have - no appointment without more guidelines from the government.

Of those who are more vulnerable but don’t qualify for a letter, we need to ask more questions to judge their vulnerability. A good question is “how are you doing your shopping”. If the answer is they are getting everything delivered then we can certainly make our salons safe for them but the question is are we safe to treat them or are we putting them at risk. If you and your client are both wearing an accredited FFP3 respirator mask, properly fitted and you have full PPE on (visor, sanitised hands, disposable apron) and sanitise everything as per new normal protocols AND your client does not touch her face or her personal belongings until she’s used hand sanitiser, the answer is yes.

The virus is a respiratory disease. You may need to modify treatments, for example you might want to do a chair massage over clothes and advise your client to change and wash her clothes when she gets home. But it’s certainly possible to offer most treatments. You just need to think through every aspect of the treatment and make sure that virus and virus carrying airborne contaminants such as dust, water vapour, aerosols, microscopic hair and skin cells stays out of her lungs.

I wouldn’t offer a treatment that needs a mask to be removed if he/she is wearing a mask that protects the wearer. I wouldn’t encourage anyone to remove the protection they feel they need for their safety. If she’s arrived wearing a mask that protects me, but not her and I’m happy that my PPE and protocols protect me AND her to reduce the infection risk, statistically to the level of her wearing a FFP3 mask, whether she wears one or notthen I would treat.

Group three are carrying on their lives as best they can. Assuming you’re not splashing out on medical grade FFP3 masks, you can manage the risk you pose to them by ensuring that you and members of your household are not exposing yourself to more risks than your client is taking. So if your client is only shopping during dedicated shopping times and you go to the supermarket as normal, you might want to not go to the supermarket for 14 days before the booking.

If it’s not possible for everyone in your household to avoid the activities your client is avoiding for 14 days before the appointment for instance if you have children in school or your partner or parent/sibling is a key worker not working from home. I don’t think you should be treating her. If you’re looking forward to visiting the pub, or having a socially distanced BBQ, again, don’t treat. The easiest solution is to buy FFP3 masks to use for these clients and crack on with your new normal protocols.

if we offer dedicated days/times and a more vulnerable person doesn’t book because “it’s not convenient” we can’t live other people’s lives for them. We must do our risk assessments, consider their needs, put measures in place and communicate these clearly to our clients but after that, it’s up to them. If they choose not to wear an FFP3 mask, it’s up to them.

If they can’t wear an FFP3 mask, then we must not accept them unless we are wearing an FFP3 mask. Our own PPE and new normal protocols is more important than the clients that we treat earlier in the day, because we’ll be sanitising everything in between appointments, so everything will be fresh for each client anyway.

I to was wrestling with the worry that I’ll put aside dedicated slots for more vulnerable people and have some idiot come in straight from the supermarket. I think PPE and protocols deal with this worry.
 

TheDuchess

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Fear 2 What about the risks that my asymptomatic client infects me?

I had this fear too. I’m still researching and learning and I’m gradually feeling more comfortable as I start to understand the risks better. I suggest that you take a treatment that you have strong demand for and focus your attention on how to make that treatment safe for you and your client. I’ve been doing a lot of studying and research and I’ve concluded that If I improve the air filtration and the air ventilation. (Ideally both) I’ll feel safe to wax clients below the waist if we are both wearing some sort of mask, and I’ve got a visor on over the top. Of course it means spending money, but once I discovered that spending one week’s projected income could enable me to reopen, I felt a lot better.

I also found that the red lines that I’d drawn, about the treatments that were out of the question, started to get a bit fuzzy.

But basically, it’s an “how to eat an elephant” question. Focus on what you can do, start with something that seems manageable and worth doing. Ive got a lot of vulnerable clients that I didn’t feel happy to welcome back, but I also have strong waxing demand from low risk clients, so I went with the waxing treatments to start.
 

TheDuchess

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Fear 3 How will we modify treatments to be safe?

Again, this is a one bite at a time issue. I have an enormous menu of treatments and I pretty much decided to reopen just with bikini and leg waxing. But after I was happy to do those treatments (I haven’t opened by the way, this is all my get ready planning) I thought (as I’m quick) I could do an underarm. I thought, no way am I doing facial waxing. But what about brows if I stand at the head of the couch behind the client’s head...As I won’t be accepting short bookings, (I need a minimum of £40 per client) the brows I’ll be asked for will be a client who’s just had her bikini and underarms done. i thought about the clients that book for all those treatments, and I thought, yeah, I trust these women to be sensible and safe. So I’ll do those ladies brows.

I was adamant that I wasn’t booking lash lifting. But I’ve had an enquiry from an older lady! And a pregnant one. And then I had an email from Yumi lashlifting with a PPE kit which includes a higher grade mask and I felt a bit better about adding lashlifting treatments to my reopening menu.

I was sure I wouldn’t be doing facials for months. But Dermologica are training in their clean touch protocol and I thought “really?” But then I thought about one or two of my facials that I could consider if Ibought a better mask.

so at present I’m researching masks as a lot make all sorts of claims but haven’t been independently verified - which means they are not approved PPE.

I’m taking no chances on opening without absolutely everything meeting government guidelines, and since I haven’t exactly been impressed with some of the government advice, I want to exceed the minimum standard.

So yes it’s scary, and there will be changes, but there are also opportunities as well. I’m reopening on the 15th as I have a dedicated shop, so I’m allowed to reopen that section. It’ll be tumbleweed of course, I don’t sell that much retail, but it will be a step closer to reopening properly.
 

Alexandra T

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Fear 3 How will we modify treatments to be safe?

Again, this is a one bite at a time issue. I have an enormous menu of treatments and I pretty much decided to reopen just with bikini and leg waxing. But after I was happy to do those treatments (I haven’t opened by the way, this is all my get ready planning) I thought (as I’m quick) I could do an underarm. I thought, no way am I doing facial waxing. But what about brows if I stand at the head of the couch behind the client’s head...As I won’t be accepting short bookings, (I need a minimum of £40 per client) the brows I’ll be asked for will be a client who’s just had her bikini and underarms done. i thought about the clients that book for all those treatments, and I thought, yeah, I trust these women to be sensible and safe. So I’ll do those ladies brows.

I was adamant that I wasn’t booking lash lifting. But I’ve had an enquiry from an older lady! And a pregnant one. And then I had an email from Yumi lashlifting with a PPE kit which includes a higher grade mask and I felt a bit better about adding lashlifting treatments to my reopening menu.

I was sure I wouldn’t be doing facials for months. But Dermologica are training in their clean touch protocol and I thought “really?” But then I thought about one or two of my facials that I could consider if Ibought a better mask.

so at present I’m researching masks as a lot make all sorts of claims but haven’t been independently verified - which means they are not approved PPE.

I’m taking no chances on opening without absolutely everything meeting government guidelines, and since I haven’t exactly been impressed with some of the government advice, I want to exceed the minimum standard.

So yes it’s scary, and there will be changes, but there are also opportunities as well. I’m reopening on the 15th as I have a dedicated shop, so I’m allowed to reopen that section. It’ll be tumbleweed of course, I don’t sell that much retail, but it will be a step closer to reopening properly.
How have you got on with your mask research?
I have got some KN95 medical grade ones but the are very expensive and it says they should only be worn for 30 mins at a time. So I don’t know if they will be practical.
Like you said some of the others aren’t classed as PPE.
I’m going to limit my treatments too and insist clients wear a mask as part of my policy.
 

Alexandra T

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Hi,
I'm hoping we can lend a hand with some of the PPE requirements. If you have any questions about finding quality products and which to use do let us know and hopefully we can help you out.
Please can you tell me your recommendations as regards to which masks to get?
I have got some KN95 medical grade ones as I thought they’d offer the best protection but I’ve since read that they say only wear for 30 mins at a time so I’m not sure how practical they’ll be!
 

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Hi everyone and thanks for the replies. The Duchess - thanks for all that information! It really helps.

I’m in Scotland so we’re still a little in the dark as to what treatments can be done after lockdown.
Someone was saying for massage just open the window - but the Spa I work in doesn’t have windows in the rooms!

If we follow what England are doing then it’s unlikely we’ll be doing facials or any facial waxing etc.

I do wish they’d give us a list of treatments that are safe to do. X
 

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Plasma Pen

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Please can you tell me your recommendations as regards to which masks to get?
I have got some KN95 medical grade ones as I thought they’d offer the best protection but I’ve since read that they say only wear for 30 mins at a time so I’m not sure how practical they’ll be!
Many you can indeed only wear for only 30 mins as they're only designed for smog protection and are not genuine KN95 (which is supposed to be FFP2/N95 equivalent). What you need are proper KN95 masks which along with basic legal things like an EU Declaration of Conformity will have an approved Notifying Body Number for their testing (like ours do which was done by the BSI) and an actual test report. These proper KN95 masks should give over 8 hours of heavyweight protection.

Hope this helps.

Dylan
 

Alexandra T

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Many you can indeed only wear for only 30 mins as they're only designed for smog protection and are not genuine KN95 (which is supposed to be FFP2/N95 equivalent). What you need are proper KN95 masks which along with basic legal things like an EU Declaration of Conformity will have an approved Notifying Body Number for their testing (like ours do which was done by the BSI) and an actual test report. These proper KN95 masks should give over 8 hours of heavyweight protection.

Hope this helps.

Dylan
Thanks so much this is really helpful
 

Plasma Pen

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Hi all, ok, take all your fears and work through them in a logical order.

Fear One. What about vulnerable people?

Vulnerable people can be put into 3 groups, 1. Those that have been written to by the government to stay indoors - or who feel that they should have received a letter. 2. Those who know they are in a more vulnerable group but not needing a letter and have chosen to stay indoors and get everything delivered. 3. Those who have been advised they fall into a higher risk category and are managing this as best they can, using the dedicated supermarket times and wearing masks when they leave the house.

Personally I don’t think we shouldn’t be suggesting to the shielded group that they can come out for a hair/beauty appointment. The government advice has been that this group should stay home. So if they’ve had a letter, or feel they should have - no appointment without more guidelines from the government.

Of those who are more vulnerable but don’t qualify for a letter, we need to ask more questions to judge their vulnerability. A good question is “how are you doing your shopping”. If the answer is they are getting everything delivered then we can certainly make our salons safe for them but the question is are we safe to treat them or are we putting them at risk. If you and your client are both wearing an accredited FFP3 respirator mask, properly fitted and you have full PPE on (visor, sanitised hands, disposable apron) and sanitise everything as per new normal protocols AND your client does not touch her face or her personal belongings until she’s used hand sanitiser, the answer is yes.

The virus is a respiratory disease. You may need to modify treatments, for example you might want to do a chair massage over clothes and advise your client to change and wash her clothes when she gets home. But it’s certainly possible to offer most treatments. You just need to think through every aspect of the treatment and make sure that virus and virus carrying airborne contaminants such as dust, water vapour, aerosols, microscopic hair and skin cells stays out of her lungs.

I wouldn’t offer a treatment that needs a mask to be removed if he/she is wearing a mask that protects the wearer. I wouldn’t encourage anyone to remove the protection they feel they need for their safety. If she’s arrived wearing a mask that protects me, but not her and I’m happy that my PPE and protocols protect me AND her to reduce the infection risk, statistically to the level of her wearing a FFP3 mask, whether she wears one or notthen I would treat.

Group three are carrying on their lives as best they can. Assuming you’re not splashing out on medical grade FFP3 masks, you can manage the risk you pose to them by ensuring that you and members of your household are not exposing yourself to more risks than your client is taking. So if your client is only shopping during dedicated shopping times and you go to the supermarket as normal, you might want to not go to the supermarket for 14 days before the booking.

If it’s not possible for everyone in your household to avoid the activities your client is avoiding for 14 days before the appointment for instance if you have children in school or your partner or parent/sibling is a key worker not working from home. I don’t think you should be treating her. If you’re looking forward to visiting the pub, or having a socially distanced BBQ, again, don’t treat. The easiest solution is to buy FFP3 masks to use for these clients and crack on with your new normal protocols.

if we offer dedicated days/times and a more vulnerable person doesn’t book because “it’s not convenient” we can’t live other people’s lives for them. We must do our risk assessments, consider their needs, put measures in place and communicate these clearly to our clients but after that, it’s up to them. If they choose not to wear an FFP3 mask, it’s up to them.

If they can’t wear an FFP3 mask, then we must not accept them unless we are wearing an FFP3 mask. Our own PPE and new normal protocols is more important than the clients that we treat earlier in the day, because we’ll be sanitising everything in between appointments, so everything will be fresh for each client anyway.

I to was wrestling with the worry that I’ll put aside dedicated slots for more vulnerable people and have some idiot come in straight from the supermarket. I think PPE and protocols deal with this worry.
We did a free guide with all this info and every step by step for every scenario to help on all of this but the admins won't let me post a link to download it (unless someone specifically asks for it).

FFP3 by the way is expensive overkill - you do know that they actually allow you to expel your own particles via the valve so they protect you but offer no protection to others? They should only be for for use by a doctor working on someone with COVID who obviously can't catch it - the same doctors then switch to FFP2/KN95/N95 when they're not with a COVID patient. Faceshields etc. though, big tick. Clients themselves can actually just be provided with a basic 3-ply surgical mask if you are wearing a FFP2/KN95/N95 and faceshield unless you especially want to pay for one of those grades of masks. Remember too that any kind of masks are only useful in conjunction with proper handwashing and use of other PPE like gloves etc. plus it's all about how these items are applied. So don't be lulled into a false sense of security. I say this by the way as someone who makes millions of masks and who has been supplying them direct to the NHS and other key workers since day one.

Anyway, in respect to vulnerable populations then for the foreseeable future you really should treat all vulnerable populations as an absolute contraindication to receiving a service from you. This includes persons over the age of 65, those with chronic medical conditions and/or those with compromised immune systems. Here’s some simple language you can use:

"In compliance with government recommendations to protect our most vulnerable populations, we are not working with clients with compromised immune systems, clients aged 65 or above or clients in other elevated at-risk categories at this current time"

If the above is not appropriate then consider extending your usual working hours so that you can still see all your customers without having too many people in your environment at the same time and yes, like the supermarkets already implemented, do consider allotting specific times to your more vulnerable (and/or important clients) and do so ideally in the morning when your workspace is likely at its cleanest and when you are less busy.
 

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Tinkerbell
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We did a free guide with all this info and every step by step for every scenario to help on all of this but the admins won't let me post a link to download it (unless someone specifically asks for it).

FFP3 by the way is expensive overkill - you do know that they actually allow you to expel your own particles via the valve so they protect you but offer no protection to others? They should only be for for use by a doctor working on someone with COVID who obviously can't catch it - the same doctors then switch to FFP2/KN95/N95 when they're not with a COVID patient. Faceshields etc. though, big tick. Clients themselves can actually just be provided with a basic 3-ply surgical mask if you are wearing a FFP2/KN95/N95 and faceshield unless you especially want to pay for one of those grades of masks. Remember too that any kind of masks are only useful in conjunction with proper handwashing and use of other PPE like gloves etc. plus it's all about how these items are applied. So don't be lulled into a false sense of security. I say this by the way as someone who makes millions of masks and who has been supplying them direct to the NHS and other key workers since day one.

Anyway, in respect to vulnerable populations then for the foreseeable future you really should treat all vulnerable populations as an absolute contraindication to receiving a service from you. This includes persons over the age of 65, those with chronic medical conditions and/or those with compromised immune systems. Here’s some simple language you can use:

"In compliance with government recommendations to protect our most vulnerable populations, we are not working with clients with compromised immune systems, clients aged 65 or above or clients in other elevated at-risk categories at this current time"

If the above is not appropriate then consider extending your usual working hours so that you can still see all your customers without having too many people in your environment at the same time and yes, like the supermarkets already implemented, do consider allotting specific times to your more vulnerable (and/or important clients) and do so ideally in the morning when your workspace is likely at its cleanest and when you are less busy.
Hi there, would you be able to post the link to the free guide please?
 

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