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Taking on new staff

SalonGeek

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Hi guys

Well The Nail Lounge has been open for three weeks now and we are doing much better then I had originally anticipated. So busy in fact that I officially lost my voice on Saturday, thankfully it is coming back in fits and bursts. My reason for this thread is to ask you guys for your expertise.

I am already having to turn down pedicures and manicures as I have my hands full, I am hoping to employ either a manicurist or Nail Tech. Unfortunately in Jersey there is a severe lack of our sort.

Can you salon owners/employers give me some idea on how to aproach pay etc... I am hoping to take on someone contract. That way I don't have to pay their national stamp. Could you give me some idea on both that matter and also contracts with regards to ensuring they don't nick your clientel etc...

Any help much apreciated.

Kind Regards
 

Bodacious

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there seems to be a real problem in getting well trained staff.

One thing you have to consider is how much control you want, if you take them on self emplyed then you dont have as much control as if they were on contract. You can get some good booklets from the inland rev reference self employed staff as if you are providing equipment and stuff then technically they are not self employed and so you are responsible.

I took mine on on contract wher I then have full control over what they do and the standered of theri work, but it also means tht they have to guarentee them a the paid minimum wage so you do pay then for at times doing nothing if you are not busy.

It's a huge decision so good luck!
 

Prionace

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myallop

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Hi Gina,

Always difficult to get good staff but all you can do is interview, get at least one reference if possible and go off your gut feeling.
Don't know what it is like in Jersey but on the mainland if you have staff who work the same hours each week and don't actually "hire" a space then that is usually enough for the revenue to decide they are employed.
All our girls work on a basic wage plus commission for both services provided and retail items sold, seems to work OK but is obviously a bit of extra work to sort it out.
Our contracts state that "poaching" customers is gross misconduct and therefore a sackable offence, having said that I don't think it has stopped any of them taking customers when they do leave. You should also always hold a little in reserve, by that I mean our pay month ends on the 20th but the pay is not paid until the 30th. Because our contract states that they must not take customers when they leave, if we do find out it gives us the option to take some of their wages back (EG the commission rules say that it can be withdrawn at any time).The other thing our contract says is that the correct notice must be given (IE two weeks) or, once again, a financial penalty can be invoked. We just had to do this after having a couple of girls walk out on us about three years ago with no notice at all (and one of them was in December when the book was completely full).
Anyway, good luck with what you decide to do.

Mark .Y.
 

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Thanks for your advice guys

I had a walkin tech. yesterday who was looking for work. At first I couldn't believe my luck. She seemed fine and had similar ideas to me. She had all the cert. and college education. I asked her to do a set on me. Well firstly she didn't want to, as she was embarassed. (like I am gonna employ someone without experiencing her first) When she finally started I was horrified. She didnt tailor my tips, she just stuck them on my already ample free edge. She didn't buff them down and they were natural tips. When I asked her to do so - bad move - she burnt me and thinned out my thumb nail so that it now creases when I apply any pressure on my thumb pad. Lesson learnt, I should have stopped her there. But no silly me. She went on to apply acrylic in Zone two of my nail and after fannying around wipping the liquid off the brush completely she couldnt get her head round why the product wouldnt move, it was rock hard!!! I showed her the three zones of the nail - why I bothered? I thought she might learn something at least and save all these mobile clients she is alledgedly doing. On to filling, mostly on my skin and cuticles, not the nail. I now have three throbbing burns on my cuticles of three fingers, the only fingers I allowed her to file. She even tryed to pretend she hadn't burnt me by covering up the blood with her finger and file.

When she left I soaked them off, which was bloody agony. Never again, not on my nails anyway. My fella has said to get anyone else to do it on his nails. If you can get a tip on to them well you could get them onto anything.

How do these people get qualified. Not being funny but I have no formal cert. I am doing my NVQ when the new one is out. She claimed that her product training with NSI tought her what she knows, not being funny but even a totally untrained person would have done a better job. As if she had watched someone doing her nails and tried to copy it.

Lesson learned anyway.
 

claire 1

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Hi


Around by me I live in the southwest, most salons rent the space, i think the going rate in £100 per week, you would have to decide what is a fair price for where you are, so basicly anything over the rent is the nail tech's, the nail tech is less likely that way to do any business away from salon as she has to make the rent, as for interviewing, i think the best way is to take anyones qualifications on face value, but during the interview if you allow enough time it is always a good idea to get her to do your nails, paying particular attention to her consultation and nail prep, you will soon know if she is experienced.

Cheers

Claire x
 

Fab Freak

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claire 1 said:
Hi


Around by me I live in the southwest, most salons rent the space, i think the going rate in £100 per week, you would have to decide what is a fair price for where you are, so basicly anything over the rent is the nail tech's, the nail tech is less likely that way to do any business away from salon as she has to make the rent, as for interviewing, i think the best way is to take anyones qualifications on face value, but during the interview if you allow enough time it is always a good idea to get her to do your nails, paying particular attention to her consultation and nail prep, you will soon know if she is experienced.

Cheers

Claire x
God Good that's expensive to rent space I could rent a shop, pay my rates etc for that...
 

Fab Freak

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..personally I'd want to see certificates (originals) and his or hers portfolio as I think this is like a Technicians CV and it would give you a picture of their other abilities.. and of course a set of nails completed in the salon and a good hours chat about the industry and hygienve blah blah...
 

Sassy Hassy

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I have just taken on a part time beauty therapist who has completed level 2 and is still doing level 3 at our local college. She is as keen as mustard, is up to date on all the latest techniques, hygiene etc and is full of good ideas. I came across her whilst having a pedicure elsewhere and she was the best friend of the person performing my ped. I sat down and calmly went through exactly what I expect of her ie hygiene, standards, client care, consulation etc and she is great. All her new clients are rebooking. I have also paid higher than the average pay to keep her motivated plus make her feel valued - reward her for a good job and advise if areas can be improved.


If you look after your employees(s) they will not feel the need to move on and "poach" clients who probably came back to your salon because they were looked after so well by your staff.

Go on your gut feeling if you feel you will get on with them. Get them to do a model set and determine if they can improve and need further training. It's a tough one. Good luck
Sarah
 

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