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Freelancetrainer

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I’ve emailed them.
 

Alexandra T

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I’ve emailed them.
I’m with the guild too, I can only think it’s because you are applying the eyelash tint and whilst it’s developing you are away from that area, the developing time is the longest part of the treatment.
But it is strange as you don’t need to stay near the face whilst the eyebrows are taking, you could keep moving away.
Personally I’ve decided not to offer any facial treatments or facial waxing so I’m glad their risk assessment agrees these aren’t Covid safe but I wasn’t going to do eyebrow/eyelash treatments either as I don’t want to be near the face so I’m surprised they are saying an eyelash tint is safe.
 

CFBS

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They seem to have overlooked the fact that if you are doing eye treatments your client can wear a mask (not covering) and the therapist wear a visor.
I always step away from the couch when tint is taking anyway to complete their treatment card & write out their bill.

Also with some facials you are not with the client 100% of the time. If they have a mask applied, you can easily be 2m away for 25 mins or more which reduces the 'close contact' time. Plus the fact you stand behind the client to do a facial. This seems to be ok if I were behind them washing hair!!

Ultimately they are saying it is up to the salon owner to write the risk assessment and their templates are only guidance. So if you can modify the treatment to be more safe then you could perform more services potentially.
 
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Freelancetrainer

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And no eye lashes. So no work at all for eyelash technicians. Dentists can go inside mouths with appropriate ppe so I can’t see why eyelash technicians can’t work with appropriate ppe. And as you say, the client too over their mouth.
 

TheDuchess

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A visor is basically a sneeze shield and it protects your eyes as well as your nose and mouth. What it doesn’t do is filter out any micro particles floating in the air. So if you’re close to a client, I can’t help but feel you’re not very well protected.

Reusable NHS masks are individually fitted and then tested. You put a air tight chamber over your head and see if you can smell a fragranced gas - (other tests are available.). That’s the PPE that dentists are using, and it’s the same standard for industry workers using dangerous chemicals etc.

I’d feel ok to work on brows and lashes with a higher spec mask. The question is which one? Most of the reusable masks haven’t been verified, just the lining materials. The fit around the face is key - otherwise it doesn’t matter how good the lining material is. But I’ve looked up the verification process - and you’ll never guess? A manufacturer can self verify! In other words, if they believe they’ve made them to the published standard, they write themselves a little certificate and send it off.

So I’m guessing this is why we’re not being told that treatments are safe to do with masks, realistically we aren’t likely to be able to access the sort of mask that will keep us safe. The standard we need will keep out tear gas. (That’s how my respirator in the army was tested). I guess we can do our own improvised sniff tests to see how good a seal we’ve achieved.
 

TheDuchess

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Although the Guild guidelines seem illogical, what they are really saying is that if you work ofaces most of the time: brows and lashes, a bit of facial threading etc, you’re not safe. If, however, over the whole day you only do a bit of face work, on one or two clients, the risk is probably acceptable.

This means that we should turn away short facial bookings, because we might end up doing too much facial work.

If we only accept facial treatments as part of a longer booking, we keep our overall risk down to tolerable levels. By refusing to accept bookings that are 51% or more face exposure, we keep the whole industry safe.

Clients need to understand that they can’t just nip in for a lunch time lip wax or brow tint and shape. Eye lash tinting takes longer and doesn’t involve much work over the face, you can’t fit in many per hour. This is why lash tinting is probably safer than brow tinting. You can do more brow tints per hour than lash tints. so there’s more theoretical risk over a day of brows than with lashes.

Does that make more sense?
 

Freelancetrainer

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A visor is basically a sneeze shield and it protects your eyes as well as your nose and mouth. What it doesn’t do is filter out any micro particles floating in the air. So if you’re close to a client, I can’t help but feel you’re not very well protected.

Reusable NHS masks are individually fitted and then tested. You put a air tight chamber over your head and see if you can smell a fragranced gas - (other tests are available.). That’s the PPE that dentists are using, and it’s the same standard for industry workers using dangerous chemicals etc.

I’d feel ok to work on brows and lashes with a higher spec mask. The question is which one? Most of the reusable masks haven’t been verified, just the lining materials. The fit around the face is key - otherwise it doesn’t matter how good the lining material is. But I’ve looked up the verification process - and you’ll never guess? A manufacturer can self verify! In other words, if they believe they’ve made them to the published standard, they write themselves a little certificate and send it off.

So I’m guessing this is why we’re not being told that treatments are safe to do with masks, realistically we aren’t likely to be able to access the sort of mask that will keep us safe. The standard we need will keep out tear gas. (That’s how my respirator in the army was tested). I guess we can do our own improvised sniff tests to see how good a seal we’ve achieved.
Correct. We are encouraged not too because the nhs etc need them. So our only option is visors and masks and gloves.
 

Freelancetrainer

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Although the Guild guidelines seem illogical, what they are really saying is that if you work ofaces most of the time: brows and lashes, a bit of facial threading etc, you’re not safe. If, however, over the whole day you only do a bit of face work, on one or two clients, the risk is probably acceptable.

This means that we should turn away short facial bookings, because we might end up doing too much facial work.

If we only accept facial treatments as part of a longer booking, we keep our overall risk down to tolerable levels. By refusing to accept bookings that are 51% or more face exposure, we keep the whole industry safe.

Clients need to understand that they can’t just nip in for a lunch time lip wax or brow tint and shape. Eye lash tinting takes longer and doesn’t involve much work over the face, you can’t fit in many per hour. This is why lash tinting is probably safer than brow tinting. You can do more brow tints per hour than lash tints. so there’s more theoretical risk over a day of brows than with lashes.

Does that make more sense?
It does. But the Guild have made no mention of any of that. They have said irrespective of the number of clients. Just it’s not safe. Fortunately I do very few eyebrows and lips. I specialise is intimate waxing but do all the body and massage. I don’t do facials. Lash technicians and make up artists that only do those treatments I see are still advertising for after lockdown so either their Associations etc are saying different to the Guild or they are ignoring them. Curious to know if the BTA etc share the same views or each have different views. Anyone?
 

Enchanting Beauty

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It’s all so confusing. If only one federation could put out a detailed list of the do’s & dont’s it would be so much easier. Each federation has there own guidelines so that’s where things get muddled & you don’t know what to do for the best.

We’re told not to buy the medical grade masks, to leave them for healthcare which I believe is the right thing to do, but some of the treatments we do require a higher grade mask...and as you say, which one?! They are very expensive to just try out.

On a slightly lighter note, speaking of visors, can anyone recommend any please? That can be sanitised & reused & ideally comfortable to be worn for a decent length of time. I have contacted flatshield about their visors gapping at the top but have had no response.
 

Alexandra T

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A visor is basically a sneeze shield and it protects your eyes as well as your nose and mouth. What it doesn’t do is filter out any micro particles floating in the air. So if you’re close to a client, I can’t help but feel you’re not very well protected.

Reusable NHS masks are individually fitted and then tested. You put a air tight chamber over your head and see if you can smell a fragranced gas - (other tests are available.). That’s the PPE that dentists are using, and it’s the same standard for industry workers using dangerous chemicals etc.

I’d feel ok to work on brows and lashes with a higher spec mask. The question is which one? Most of the reusable masks haven’t been verified, just the lining materials. The fit around the face is key - otherwise it doesn’t matter how good the lining material is. But I’ve looked up the verification process - and you’ll never guess? A manufacturer can self verify! In other words, if they believe they’ve made them to the published standard, they write themselves a little certificate and send it off.

So I’m guessing this is why we’re not being told that treatments are safe to do with masks, realistically we aren’t likely to be able to access the sort of mask that will keep us safe. The standard we need will keep out tear gas. (That’s how my respirator in the army was tested). I guess we can do our own improvised sniff tests to see how good a seal we’ve achieved.
I thought they were saying all facials were not safe to do:

Facial Treatments

Does the treatment involve working in the highest risk zone for more than half the time of the treatment?

Yes

If Yes, Can the treatment be modified to spend less than half the time in the highest risk zone?

No

What additional PPE is required for Covid-19?

N/A
But maybe I’ve missed



Conclusion
This treatment is NOT safe to offer under the Covid-19 safe working guidelines
 

Freelancetrainer

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That’s correct. The Guild day no to all facials, eyebrow tints, make up (except lessons) and false lashes.
 

Freelancetrainer

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Even the experts have different opinions so I think you have to do what feels right for you and read all the guidelines etc.
 

CFBS

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Ellisons have visors for sale. I have some and they seem quite comfy but haven’t worn one beyond amusing the family so far!
 

Enchanting Beauty

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Ellisons have visors for sale. I have some and they seem quite comfy but haven’t worn one beyond amusing the family so far!
Are these the ones you have?
The others look so bulky, these
 

CFBS

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Are these the ones you have?
The others look so bulky, these
The esthetix ones. They feel fine to wear. The foam is comfy on your forehead. The photo does make them look bulky but they’re not really.
They have one decent elastic strap that goes round the back of your head.
 

Enchanting Beauty

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The esthetix ones. They feel fine to wear. The foam is comfy on your forehead. The photo does make them look bulky but they’re not really.
They have one decent elastic strap that goes round the back of your head.
That”s good to know. Thanks!
 

Freelancetrainer

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I git mine on Amazon. A pack of 12 I think. They sit close to the forehead. Comfortable enough. I only had it on half an hour though to see if it would steam up. It didn’t.
 

Enchanting Beauty

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I git mine on Amazon. A pack of 12 I think. They sit close to the forehead. Comfortable enough. I only had it on half an hour though to see if it would steam up. It didn’t.
Thanks! My day to shop around today.
 

House Beauty

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There's an article in a news app online, stating Boris is considering letting us open with all other non essential shops on June 15th. Please let there be some truth to this and not the usual lazy journalists who are grasping for stories.
Honestly I’m hoping the opposite.

Until we have proper shields for using the couch and doing face and brow treatments these face shields are useless to our clients. Safe for us wearing one but with them on the table just useless as we are over their faces and the base of the shield doesn’t protect them. Then they can’t wear one to protect us while we do it.

I’m making something that might work but I can totally see why we aren’t allowed yet.

I think spray tanning is totally safe as distanced anyway, nails fine with sneeze guards but there isn’t anything in the UK yet for lying down treatments. I’m getting there with designs but it’s not easy when it’s so hard to get hold of materials for it.

If they do say we can open I will personally be waiting until at least September as I have only just been to my first click and collect shop, without a queue.Been inside this whole time give or take maybe 5 trips total to drop off for grandparents and walks on the field next to my house. I only just went for a walk in an actual big park (it was thankfully empty), but I am just not ready to be out in the world. My family are distancing but my in laws made me ill within 1m when I was picking something up and tried to move away from them when they got close. Really ill. Like the kind of ill that is concerning at that distance. Even though I disinfected everything they gave me and didn’t touch my face or clothes and wash my hands. I can’t have my clients getting ill from me if one of them gives it to me...it’s too easy to catch.
 

Enchanting Beauty

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I git mine on Amazon. A pack of 12 I think. They sit close to the forehead. Comfortable enough. I only had it on half an hour though to see if it would steam up. It didn’t.
Have you got the link to these please? Have had a search on amazon but everything I see has got awful reviews!
 

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