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TheDuchess

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I’ve been practising protocols and PPE. I had a practise wax on a member of my household, wearing my prescription glasses, a visor and a mask.

I found it pretty difficult to be honest. Everything was comfortable to wear, but I did get warm and my visor started to fog after 30 minutes. Without a mask, I think I’d have steamed up in seconds. Waxing is warm work.

The mask was slipping as I chatted, and I always talk through a wax. I’ve been wearing masks for shift work, as I volunteered to make visors for the NHS, but I wasn’t chatting with my head moving around. I hadn’t realised this would be an issue.

I was also getting problems with reflections on my visor, which had the same effect as if my glasses were foggy. I took everything off and recleaned the visor screen but it made no difference. No way would I feel confident I could do highly detailed work like brows through a visor. I know there are fog free products, but I’m not sure how well they’ll work on acetate sheet as opposed to glass. I think I’ll have to work with just my prescription glasses on as protection and get an elastic band to secure them tightly around my face as they often slide down my nose during a treatment.

What was also interesting was how hard it was to remember all the new normal protocols. On my dummy run I slipped up several times. I’m going to need signs and a visual prompt in the treatment room I think. And I’ll have to role play welcoming the client into the salon. I think it’s the effect of wearing a visor. Before lock down I was very comfortable directing a client to wash her hands and so on, but yesterday I forgot all of that. My “client” arrived, I popped my visor on, and BOOM I forgot to take her temperature. I don’t think my directions were very clear under a mask and visor, she managed not to use hand sanitiser beforehand.

What was very dismaying was how anxious I felt. I didn’t like us being in a small room, the ventilation didn’t feel adequate at all. I don’t feel comfortable doing treatments yet and I’ve done so much preparation. I was sure I was ready to reopen as soon as announced, but now I’m having serious doubts.
 

Enchanting Beauty

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I shall be asking my clients to wear a mask, i’m going in their homes so I feel they’re less likely to tell me if they’re unwell.
Can I ask, where does everyone stand on clients that cannot wear a mask due to breathing problems? Do we still treat them as they could potentially be infected?
Anyone who refuses to wear a mask for no reason at all won’t be treated by me.
 

Enchanting Beauty

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I’ve been practising protocols and PPE. I had a practise wax on a member of my household, wearing my prescription glasses, a visor and a mask.

I found it pretty difficult to be honest. Everything was comfortable to wear, but I did get warm and my visor started to fog after 30 minutes. Without a mask, I think I’d have steamed up in seconds. Waxing is warm work.

The mask was slipping as I chatted, and I always talk through a wax. I’ve been wearing masks for shift work, as I volunteered to make visors for the NHS, but I wasn’t chatting with my head moving around. I hadn’t realised this would be an issue.

I was also getting problems with reflections on my visor, which had the same effect as if my glasses were foggy. I took everything off and recleaned the visor screen but it made no difference. No way would I feel confident I could do highly detailed work like brows through a visor. I know there are fog free products, but I’m not sure how well they’ll work on acetate sheet as opposed to glass. I think I’ll have to work with just my prescription glasses on as protection and get an elastic band to secure them tightly around my face as they often slide down my nose during a treatment.

What was also interesting was how hard it was to remember all the new normal protocols. On my dummy run I slipped up several times. I’m going to need signs and a visual prompt in the treatment room I think. And I’ll have to role play welcoming the client into the salon. I think it’s the effect of wearing a visor. Before lock down I was very comfortable directing a client to wash her hands and so on, but yesterday I forgot all of that. My “client” arrived, I popped my visor on, and BOOM I forgot to take her temperature. I don’t think my directions were very clear under a mask and visor, she managed not to use hand sanitiser beforehand.

What was very dismaying was how anxious I felt. I didn’t like us being in a small room, the ventilation didn’t feel adequate at all. I don’t feel comfortable doing treatments yet and I’ve done so much preparation. I was sure I was ready to reopen as soon as announced, but now I’m having serious doubts.
I think a lot of people are underestimating just because you have PPE it’s going to make you feel safe once back in that environment, it’s going to be nerve wracking & you’ve just proved that & that was on a member of your family, not the general public!
Also, there is a company who are selling visors. They have really good reviews on Facebook, everyone says they don’t fog up & they don’t have that horrible bug foam headband so might be worth a look for you. I will be ordering later. Here they are
 

TheDuchess

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I think it depends on the treatment and the environment.

If someone can’t wear a mask, I’d expect them to be staying at home and for everyone visiting them to wear a mask. This means that they are very unlikely to be infectious.

If the room is well ventilated and you have a small fan to move the air, you should be ok. You can upgrade to a reusable respirator FFP3 equivalent which protects you for under £45.
 

TheDuchess

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Thanks for the link. I’ve seen these.

The visors I have are British standard accredited and they were created for NHS use after lots of liaison and testing in use. One of the feedbacks we received was from a nurse saying that she always put our shields aside for the neonatal wards because they were so much more comfortable than the other visors they had.

i think there is a difference between detailed work for beauty and general nursing procedures sadly.
 

Haircutz

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I shall be asking my clients to wear a mask, i’m going in their homes so I feel they’re less likely to tell me if they’re unwell.
Can I ask, where does everyone stand on clients that cannot wear a mask due to breathing problems? Do we still treat them as they could potentially be infected?
Anyone who refuses to wear a mask for no reason at all won’t be treated by me.
If the client genuinely can’t wear a mask then you should use a medical grade disposable mask plus visor to treat that client and add the additional PPE costs into your fee.

You can also choose not to provide the service, if you feel unsafe. This is your livelihood not charity work.
 

ciderella71

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After watching interviews with 2 top scientists who confirmed the Govt has gone against all scientific advice with this phase of easing lockdown I’m not sure when Scotland will follow! They’re predicting a huge spike so I’d be wearing as much PPE as makes you feel safe.
 

Tash0088

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I’ve been practising protocols and PPE. I had a practise wax on a member of my household, wearing my prescription glasses, a visor and a mask.

I found it pretty difficult to be honest. Everything was comfortable to wear, but I did get warm and my visor started to fog after 30 minutes. Without a mask, I think I’d have steamed up in seconds. Waxing is warm work.

The mask was slipping as I chatted, and I always talk through a wax. I’ve been wearing masks for shift work, as I volunteered to make visors for the NHS, but I wasn’t chatting with my head moving around. I hadn’t realised this would be an issue.

I was also getting problems with reflections on my visor, which had the same effect as if my glasses were foggy. I took everything off and recleaned the visor screen but it made no difference. No way would I feel confident I could do highly detailed work like brows through a visor. I know there are fog free products, but I’m not sure how well they’ll work on acetate sheet as opposed to glass. I think I’ll have to work with just my prescription glasses on as protection and get an elastic band to secure them tightly around my face as they often slide down my nose during a treatment.

What was also interesting was how hard it was to remember all the new normal protocols. On my dummy run I slipped up several times. I’m going to need signs and a visual prompt in the treatment room I think. And I’ll have to role play welcoming the client into the salon. I think it’s the effect of wearing a visor. Before lock down I was very comfortable directing a client to wash her hands and so on, but yesterday I forgot all of that. My “client” arrived, I popped my visor on, and BOOM I forgot to take her temperature. I don’t think my directions were very clear under a mask and visor, she managed not to use hand sanitiser beforehand.

What was very dismaying was how anxious I felt. I didn’t like us being in a small room, the ventilation didn’t feel adequate at all. I don’t feel comfortable doing treatments yet and I’ve done so much preparation. I was sure I was ready to reopen as soon as announced, but now I’m having serious doubts.
I feel bad for saying this, but I don't want to wear visors and masks etc to do my work. I would rather not do the job I love at all than doing it wearing full PPE. Selfishly, it's partly because I won't feel comfortable carrying out treatments and partly as said before, I think it does add to our anxiety levels. I almost feel that I wouldn't as good at my job anymore or there's something missing from the treatments I used to be able to offer my clients.
Further to that, I can't imagine a client will find it particularly pleasant to have a treatment done in such a way that it kind of takes the personal experience and the luxury away from having your treatments. I know that I would just rather not have my nails done than visit a nail tech with full masks/visors etc. But I understand that is purely personal preference and not everyone will feel the same.
 

Enchanting Beauty

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I feel bad for saying this, but I don't want to wear visors and masks etc to do my work. I would rather not do the job I love at all than doing it wearing full PPE. Selfishly, it's partly because I won't feel comfortable carrying out treatments and partly as said before, I think it does add to our anxiety levels. I almost feel that I wouldn't as good at my job anymore or there's something missing from the treatments I used to be able to offer my clients.
Further to that, I can't imagine a client will find it particularly pleasant to have a treatment done in such a way that it kind of takes the personal experience and the luxury away from having your treatments. I know that I would just rather not have my nails done than visit a nail tech with full masks/visors etc. But I understand that is purely personal preference and not everyone will feel the same.
That’s how I have felt too. I’m not prepared to work without the proper precautions but doing that feels so impersonal, & i’ve kind of lost the passion a bit.
It’ll be lovely to see everyone again but when I give treatments (especially massage) I like to bundle them up in blankets etc to make them really cosy but not going to be able to do that now. Everything is going to feel so clinical.
 

ReVivebeauty

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I think it depends on the treatment and the environment.

If someone can’t wear a mask, I’d expect them to be staying at home and for everyone visiting them to wear a mask. This means that they are very unlikely to be infectious.

If the room is well ventilated and you have a small fan to move the air, you should be ok. You can upgrade to a reusable respirator FFP3 equivalent which protects you for under £45.
Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think I read somewhere (don't know where) that we shouldn't use fans because it can move any virus particles around the room?
 

Noodle

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Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think I read somewhere (don't know where) that we shouldn't use fans because it can move any virus particles around the room?
That‘s probably correct because hairdressers are not allowed to blow dry clients’ hair either for the same reason, so that makes perfect sense.
 

Holly1991

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NHBF says guidance doesn’t put a ban on hairdryers?
 

Noodle

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NHBF says guidance doesn’t put a ban on hairdryers?
Ok, I had read about it somewhere online recently that’s all ;)

Perhaps individual hairdressers will make up their own minds whether or not to offer blow drys?
 

Holly1991

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Ahh okie, just thought you may have read something more recent than what NHBF had put online earlier panicked I was going to have to contact clients again, yes I’ve read a few hairdressers are not keen on blow drying just yet
 

Freelancetrainer

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Have you read this? It’s the government guidelines. Clients are not required to wear ppe if the worker is wearing it and workers are only required to wear what they normally wear for ppe unless working on or very close to the face. If working on or very close to the face they are recommended to wear a visor. Not a mask. This is because only distance prevents the spread of COVID, not masks and visors. They just reduce risk. If working for prolonged periods on the face such as false lashes etc then the worker needs to adapt the treatment that reduces the high risk to a lower level. Not sure how they do that, muddy area.
 

Freelancetrainer

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Sorry. That was the wrong link! I’ll have to find the correct one!
 

TheDuchess

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Yes I’ve read the guidelines as well. I’m a bit puzzled to be honest.
 

Freelancetrainer

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Yes I’ve read the guidelines as well. I’m a bit puzzled to be honest.
I mostly do waxing. Facial waxing, eyelash and brow tints, mani, pedi. Nothing prolonged on the face. I always wear gloves and do have visits and masks and anti bac gel, paper tissue for hands etc. Basically it’s the washing of hands that’s being reinforced. I now can’t find the government guidelines. I can only find those on professional beauty.
 

TheDuchess

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Basically the guidelines tell us that to avoid treatments mostly around the mouth and nose - which means you can’t do a top lip wax on its own - but you could do a top lip wax if it was part of a longer booking where the lip wax was only a small part of the treatment.

and they tell us that masks make such a small difference to safety that if you need a mask to feel safe - you shouldn’t be doing the treatment - or words to that effect.


That’s not really very helpful.

The guidelines tell us to keep to shorter bookings, but don’t really advise whether 5 clients with longer bookings is the same risk as 10 clients with shorter bookings.

And advise that lash treatments may not be safe unless we can make the service safe (using some mystery method that they don’t mention)

Detailed guidance about individual treatments hasn’t been included with this guide, so I’m guessing that it’s not intended for beauty - despite all the mentions of lashes and photos with mobile massage workers. A previous report gave specific guidelines right down to using disposable wax pots and discarding left over wax.

I think they’ve gone right back to basics. It’s a respiratory infection. Coughs and sneezes spread diseases. Hand washing and distancing are all that is needed for client protection. They’re not too sure how we can work safely without medical grade PPE which is in short supply, so they can’t recommend.
 

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