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Beauty | Would You Sue If A Product Didn't Fulfil Its Promise?

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The Ed.

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I'll be honest from the get-go. I'm a little cynical about this story. If someone genuinely believes that a cream, or thousands of creams, are going to 'turn back the hands of time' then, frankly, I have to question the way their brain works.

We all know that some creams may help but let's face it, if you're still smoking and drinking and tanning and eating badly, you're going to look old and haggard and it won't matter how much cream you slap on your face. That aside, I'm interested to know how you feel about this because if Lorette Perez-Pirio wins her case to sue Procter & Gamble for failing to deliver on their anti-aging promise then it could set us all up for all sorts of wacky and weird problems.

According to the Los Angeles Times, a San Joaquin County woman, Lorette Perez-Pirio is suing P&G because her Olay products - Olay Regenerist Anti-Aging Eye Roller and Regenerating Eye Cream - have not done what they promised and 'reversed the hands of time'.

What a shocker!? Who'd have thought? I mean really! Did she honestly believe that these creams were going to perform the miracle of making her look ten years younger? No, of course she didn't and this is where I get cynical. Whether it's the cash or fifteen minutes of fame, I can only believe that Perez-Pirio has seen an opportunity and gone for it.

Unfortunately, if her case gets legs, she'll set a precedent which means that many results-based products will be shaking in their boots. Think about all the fancy new two-week or more manicures. Will they be affected? Will clients be suing the companies responsible if they chip before they're supposed to? Will it matter if clients aren't performing advised home-care? Will it matter in court if Perez-Pirio sits in the sun all day, smoking cigarettes and drinking vodka (it's a hypothetical...I have no idea how she spends her time!)

Interestingly, according to the LA Times, after taking her claims to court, P&G responded that the products actually, "do not possess the requisite competent and reliable scientific evidence," to back their products' claims. So, is this an advertising standards issue or does Perez-Pirio have the right to sue for being misled?

Who knows? What I do know is that, perhaps aside from surgery, there is no 100% effective way to turn back the hands of time. Eat well, drink well, tan well, exercise well and throw in a batch of good genes and you may get lucky. Otherwise, grow old gracefully and enjoy each line and wrinkle!

Until then...geek on!

The Ed.
 

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deanosnana

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A ridiculous lawsuit, to be sure but maybe companies shouldn't advertise results that just ain't gonna happen.
 

salj

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A ridiculous lawsuit, to be sure but maybe companies shouldn't advertise results that just ain't gonna happen.
Exactly. She sounds like a chancer trying to make a few quid and she could manage to do just that. Companies shouldn't claim that a product does something it doesn't do!
 

laurakate

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I don't think people should sue like this.

A product may work wonders on one person but not on another and that's why people try different products until they find one that works for them.

Consumers should have intelligent, realistic expecations in the same way that when they go for a facial, they need to know that it will take a course of them to give maximum effects. In this respect, I blame the "groupon" type culture who seem to want everything in exchange for paying very little.

It will be a sad day for the industry if this woman is sucessful in suing.
 

Aurasoma

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LOL oh dear, this did make me laugh - that's typical America isn't it .. if it doesn't suit then sue :D

I'll be contacting my solicitor immediately ref most hair products and facial creams I've been using over the last 20 years then :o LOL ... forget the lottery I could be sitting on a fortune :D

Thank you for amusing my afternoon !!! :Love:
 

Scottishsarah

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"P&G responded that the products actually, "do not possess the requisite competent and reliable scientific evidence," to back their products' claims"

So they are more than happy to make unreliable claims for their products? I'm going through the cupboards and anything from P&G (and I bet it will be a lot) won't be getting purchased again.
 

happyfeet

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I think this is more a trading standards kind of issue, as for suing? Mmmmm rather OTT. Yes we need to exercise caution when buying in to these radical claims but i also think these companies need to be dealt with when it comes to false advertising. What i will say with this slogan is that its not physically possible to turn back the hands of time, so its more of a catchy slogan i personally feel.
Seriously rather than this woman waste time, energy and money suing, why didnt she just report it to trading standards and use her energy for something actually worthwhile like charities, causes and such like... though i suspect she wouldnt get any financial reward for doing so. Im a grumpy moo today but honestly these people make me mad, get a grip! There are people sick, dying, homeless, hungry and so on in this world and all she has to be concerned about is a freakin beauty product!

....... And breathe happyfeet ;)
 

The Geek

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Cynicism shouldn't be a prerequisite for reading labeling claims, yet that is what we as a society have come to accept as "the norm".

While suing is certainly over the top, so is the way that most cosmetics push their message beyond the realms of reality: Shampoo ads featuring celebrities that don't use the product (but thats ok, they can use stand in hair models), Celebs being paid over $10k per tweet about products (serious), lighting and doctoring shots of before and after, etc...

These process are designed to put a product in its best light, but do so with lies that set impossible expectations. So what purpose do these processes serve? Obviously not to inform.

What is the point in advertising a message that is fabricated and that most don't believe anyway? More importantly, why do we accept such BS to be spoon-fed to us? In a way, I guess that I applaud someone for standing up to the stupidity of it all.

And hey, at least its better than suing because "Drive" wasn't like "Fast and Furious"! http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/drive-filmdistrict-lawsuit-ryan-gosling-245871
 

deanosnana

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LOL oh dear, this did make me laugh - that's typical America isn't it .. if it doesn't suit then sue :D
Honestly, I don't think it is typical America. There are some sectors of the American population that are sue happy but I believe they are the minority not the majority.
 

Lynne Baker

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If it makes the manufacturers modify their sometimes frankly ridiculous claims then I'm all for it.
We all remember when manufacturers had to start adding that lash inserts were used in their mascara ads, and rightly bloody so!
We all work in the industry and some of us are far more clued up about what is and isn't realistic, but the average 16 year old girlie out there really and truly does believe a lot of the outlandlish claims and then feels cheated.
I suspect that this particular woman is merely trying to prove a point.
 

deanosnana

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If it makes the manufacturers modify their sometimes frankly ridiculous claims then I'm all for it.
We all remember when manufacturers had to start adding that lash inserts were used in their mascara ads, and rightly bloody so!
I could not agree more!

Maybelline has an ad for their Falsies Masacara. The models lashes are outrageous and the ad states: NO falsies needed.

I can assure you when my naive self purchased Falsies Mascara, my eyelashes did NOT look like the models in the ads. :grr:
 

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Americans do have a reputation for being a litigious society. Agreed, some are a bit sue-happy.

However, marketing is a bit ridiculous on a lot of what we see. But for Pete's sake folks, use some common sense. I know if I only have 10 eye lashes in my entire head, no mascara is going to make me look like Sofia Vergara.

And if I go to the beach every weekend without benefit of sunscreen, Oil of Olay ain't gonna stop me from looking like an old beat up catcher's mitt. This woman's lawsuit does, however, set a dangerous precedent.

CND says Shellac is a 14-day manicure. It didn't last 14 days. I'm gonna sue!!!
 

deanosnana

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CND says Shellac is a 14-day manicure. It didn't last 14 days. I'm gonna sue!!!
Yeah, mine lasted 18 days...I think I will sue! :D
 

Annemarie

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Just think.. with the money she recieves from the lawsuit she can buy herself a facelift. She should look ten years younger then.:D
 

pure

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Interesting :)

Firstly people tend to be either very synical of products or they have unrealistic expections. If there was a product out there which was really capable of turning back the hands of time then we'd all be walking around looking like teenage versions of ourselves!!!

And secondly, the huge multi million companies should not be allowed to create such expectations unless they have the ability to truly fulfill them. Some hair/cosmetic/beauty advertising is frankly outrageous in their claims and this needs to stop.

Should she sue? Well frankly I don't care :) As I said if it stops the ridiculous claims thats fine!

Wll it effect us? As long as we're responsible when we advise clients, give thorough consultations and aftercare advice, and of course don't ourselves make stupid claims about the efficiancy of products then no, it shouldn't.

It's all about taking responsibily, and that applies as much to us as to our clients.
 

gr8nailz

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Interesting :)

Firstly people tend to be either very synical of products or they have unrealistic expections. If there was a product out there which was really capable of turning back the hands of time then we'd all be walking around looking like teenage versions of ourselves!!!

And secondly, the huge multi million companies should not be allowed to create such expectations unless they have the ability to truly fulfill them. Some hair/cosmetic/beauty advertising is frankly outrageous in their claims and this needs to stop.

Should she sue? Well frankly I don't care :) As I said if it stops the ridiculous claims thats fine!

Wll it effect us? As long as we're responsible when we advise clients, give thorough consultations and aftercare advice, and of course don't ourselves make stupid claims about the efficiancy of products then no, it shouldn't.

It's all about taking responsibily, and that applies as much to us as to our clients.
Your logic makes no sense to me, Pure. :wink2:
 

pure

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FlawlessBeauty

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How funny....

Does anyone remember a few years ago when a man tried to sue Unilever because their Lynx deoderant advertised that women would be attracted to you, but he didn't have a girlfriend for the whole 7 years of using it?

What a joke. I'm sure companies will be sure to double check their advertising now though xx
 

gr8nailz

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How funny....

Does anyone remember a few years ago when a man tried to sue Unilever because their Lynx deoderant advertised that women would be attracted to you, but he didn't have a girlfriend for the whole 7 years of using it?

What a joke. I'm sure companies will be sure to double check their advertising now though xx

Perhaps he should have sued his parents for his being born aesthetically challenged?
 

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