Custom Watermarkbrush in Photoshop

Seanny

Well-Known Member
#1
Making a custom watermark brush in Photoshop - Part 2

Ok, so we've still got our copyright layer as produced in part 1, yes? Good, lets get cracking, this is so easy, you'll wonder what all the fuss was about. If you dont have a copyright layer cos you've just jumped into this tutorial, you'll need to double back and do the first part .....erm, before you do the second one. Go on, get the hell outta here, the first tutorial is here. GO!!! lol

Before we move onto the final part of this tutorial, it's very important to make sure that you've had a good mess about with your final version of the copyright layer, you're totally happy that you have everything set just the way that you want it to be, ie, font, size, blending options, etc. If you're happy to move on, lets do exactly that. (incidentally, you can use the blending options to your hearts content, go on and find out what each thing does)


Ok, we're in Photoshop and we've got our copyright layer open, simply go to the overhead menu, click on 'Edit', then 'Define Brush Preset'




and now you'll be asked what name you want to call your new brush, I suggest something like 'brush23' or maybe 'morephotoshopstuff'.....ok..ok, I'm kidding, call it something sensible, dare I suggest a name like 'watermark'??? Sounds good? Go for it, name your new brush 'watermark'.

Now lets see how it works, select the 'brush' tool, see below.



To use your new custom brush, you'll have to select it from the brush selector box. Open the brush selection by clicking on the drop-down menu as show below



You'll have to scroll down to the bottom of the brush selection to find your new brush, dont forget we called it 'watermark', so scroll down and go to the brush named watermark, if you hover your cursor over each of the differnt brushes, the brush names will be displayed. Click on the watermark brush



Right, we've got our watermark brush selected, so now open your nail photo again, the one without the watermark, remember its in the 'Pics 2 Edit' folder on your desktop (see tutorial 1). The pic appears on your workspace, we can now just apply the watermark to the pic by first, making sure you have a desired colour as your foreground colour, 'grey' can be good but its your choice, now simply place the cursor over the photo and left click. Go on and do that. Hey....it looks good, yeah. :) Hang on though, thats not the best way, lets go back one stage by pressing 'control' 'shift' and 'Z' at the same time, or in the menu, go edit/undo brush tool.

This time we're going to place the watermark on a seperate layer, think of it as a sheet of cling film sitting on top of your pic. To make a new layer press 'control' and 'shift' and 'N' at the same time, a dialog box pops up, call your new layer watermark and click 'OK'. You'll now have a brand new layer in your layers palette called watermark and this is where we'll be placing the watermark brush. Make sure the layer is active (highlighted in blue),



now go to your pic and place the cursor on the pic and left click. Its looks just the same as before right? Its totally different though, because the watermark is now on its own layer, we can adjust it to suit our picture. We can increase the size for bigger pics, or decrease it for smaller ones, we can also change the opacity or transparency of the watermark layer. Just remember that when changing the size of the actual watermark, always hold down the 'Shift' key to keep the height and width in proportion. When you're happy with the result, save your pic in the same way that you did in the first tutorial 'File/save for web..'. That's it...you're done.


Open another pic, add a new layer, apply your watermark brush, save for web..
..
Open another pic, add a new layer, apply your watermark brush, save for web..

Its so easy, even Seanny can do it, and if he can do it, you can too. LOL

Have fun!!



As a test, why not open two pics, one large and one small and try this yourself
 
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