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Interesting spray tan facts

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dixie99

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Hi Geeks

Just wondered if anyone had any interesting facts or any facts in general on tanning?

Wanted to do some promo in a different kind of way xx
 

ClaireL

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def be watching this with interest!

x
 

wonderwoman

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I think the best facts can be found in books regarding spraytanning, the walking on sunshine book is a great read. In respect to Indoor tanning aka sunbeds, there is a vast amount on information on the sunbed association/training from some distributors. My main tips are always use a tan accelerator as you tan 60% more compared to nothing on your skin. xoxo
 

dixie99

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Yes I have done a few google searches and know a few

Eg dove and imperial leather are to be avoided x
 

The Tan Fan

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Hi there, a quick fact:

DHA is a colourless sugar that bonds with the dead cells on the top layer of skin. As the sugar and the dead cells bond, a colour change occurs. Every day, millions of dead skin cells are worn away, and new skin replaces it which is why self tans gradually fade.
Although its advisable to pre-exfoliate before a tanning treatment, encourage your client to do so at least 24hrs before hand so that they do not remove too much dead skin.

No dead skin= No bond = poor/pale tanning!!

Moisturise daily with an oil free moisturiser, preferably the same brand as the solution you use to keep skin hydrated and slow down the fade process!

The Tan Fan x
 

GlamourEyes11

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Hi there, a quick fact:

DHA is a colourless sugar that bonds with the dead cells on the top layer of skin. As the sugar and the dead cells bond, a colour change occurs. Every day, millions of dead skin cells are worn away, and new skin replaces it which is why self tans gradually fade.
Although its advisable to pre-exfoliate before a tanning treatment, encourage your client to do so at least 24hrs before hand so that they do not remove too much dead skin.

No dead skin= No bond = poor/pale tanning!!

Moisturise daily with an oil free moisturiser, preferably the same brand as the solution you use to keep skin hydrated and slow down the fade process!

The Tan Fan x
That's interesting to know about what happens if exfoliating too close to having the tan !!! I didn't know that :) I always tell my clients 24 hours anyway :) xx
 

furiousfrog

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Hi there, a quick fact:

DHA is a colourless sugar that bonds with the dead cells on the top layer of skin. As the sugar and the dead cells bond, a colour change occurs. Every day, millions of dead skin cells are worn away, and new skin replaces it which is why self tans gradually fade.
Although its advisable to pre-exfoliate before a tanning treatment, encourage your client to do so at least 24hrs before hand so that they do not remove too much dead skin.

No dead skin= No bond = poor/pale tanning!!

Moisturise daily with an oil free moisturiser, preferably the same brand as the solution you use to keep skin hydrated and slow down the fade process!

The Tan Fan x

Hi there - not to question you, but I got told something completely different, so if you have any info on this I'd be really interested.:confused:


We were taught that the DHA reacts initially in the deeper part of the stratum corneum before spreading over the entire upper levels and sinking to the granulosum level which is where most of the melanoidins are formed from the sugars in the tan reacting with the amino acids under the skin.

If, in actual fact, it's the dead skin that reacts with the DHA that would be completely different, so if you do have any info or links about this, I'd love to find out more!
 

The Tan Fan

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becky30

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Marking this so I can find it later x
 

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