My first pedicure ever

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#1
I'm going to start practicing pedicures on my wife before starting school.

Here's my very first one ever.

Would love everyone's expertise, tips, and tell me what I did wrong.

IMG_07052019_161308_(1080_x_1080_pixel).jpeg IMG_07052019_161216_(1080_x_1080_pixel).jpeg
 

tuan

Active Member
#2
In all my years of doing nails, I noticed that new nail techs can pick up the skills needed in a very short amount of time. After just 1-2 weeks, they can polish, shape, clean the nails to where it looks very good. So just keep practicing, you'll get it.
 
Last edited:

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#3
Thank you for that! I'll be sure to remember that. What would you say you enjoy the most about doing nails?
 

tuan

Active Member
#4
Thank you for that! I'll be sure to remember that. What would you say you enjoy the most about doing nails?
What I like:
1. Low stress
2. Easy on the body.
3. You get to communicate with people - about anything, if you want.
4. You feel good about making people happy with nice nails.

What I dislike:
1. The work environment can become dangerous and hazardous over time if you don't take the proper precautions.
2. Knowledge, procedures, use of products isn't universally agreed upon, which hurts the profession.
 

House Beauty

Active Member
#5
It looks good for a first try. Even ladies that paint their nails regularly struggle to avoid painting all over their skin so if you can do this, with a course you will be perfectly polished in no time.
 

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#6
It looks good for a first try. Even ladies that paint their nails regularly struggle to avoid painting all over their skin so if you can do this, with a course you will be perfectly polished in no time.
It's a fun challenge. So many endless possibilities. I noticed I missed a lot of the dead skin on the cuticle. But don't know yet how to manage that.
 

RosieR

Active Member
#7
It's a fun challenge. So many endless possibilities. I noticed I missed a lot of the dead skin on the cuticle. But don't know yet how to manage that.
I love feet (not smelly ones obviously ) over my years I have probably done around 5,000 pedicures. At least! I love to see a beautiful end result no matter how disfigured feet are due to arthritis and the ageing process.
Painting toes is the icing on the cake ,but all your underpinning knowledge you need for safe and effective treatment will stand you in good stead. I bet you can't wait to learn.
The additional things that you will learn at college will show you how to cut or clip nails less rounded than yours, use effective cuticle remover , and how to trim very carefully cuticle excess. as well as dealing with the callus removal and checking for contra indications prior to treatment.

If I was you , I would try and perfect the nail polish side walls and produce a more crisp cuticle line. This can be improved by dipping in acetone the orange wood stick and creating a perfect line of free space between the polish and skin/cuticle line. Give it a try !

I hope not to offend you in any way that is not my intention, i hope this is helpful and very good luck to you.
 

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#8
Loved reading this. You read my mind lol Definitely can't wait to start. I ready to redo my wifes nails. She's in nursing school right now and they can't have their fingers polished other wise I would be doing that too.

Again thank you so much! Your reply was very helpful and encouraging.
 

RosieR

Active Member
#9
I forgot to add that you could do with using a good cuticle oil to hydrate the cuticles. This can sometimes help to free the cuticle area of the dry ragged skin. Promotes healthy nails too!

When does your course begin?
 

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#10
I forgot to add that you could do with using a good cuticle oil to hydrate the cuticles. This can sometimes help to free the cuticle area of the dry ragged skin. Promotes healthy nails too!

When does your course begin?
Ooo great point. That would have been a nice finishing touch.

Looking to start in about three weeks. Very curious what day 1 will bring.

My wife's cuticles were pretty over grown. I'm pretty bad at the anatomy of the nail but there was also the thinner cutical ( the part that grows up the nail) on her nail I didn't realise could be cleaned up but I was gently able to scrape it away to reveal more area to polish. It was pretty fun.

The pinky toe seems pretty hard to do and I didn't want to hurt her in any way, but the outer edge was really thick in an area I often see her pick at, so I just left it alone.

Is the small toe usually the hardest to do?
 

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#11
I forgot to add that you could do with using a good cuticle oil to hydrate the cuticles. This can sometimes help to free the cuticle area of the dry ragged skin. Promotes healthy nails too!

When does your course begin?
One other thing... I could find a file at the time but I'm guessing I could have smoothed out the ridges a bit? I have one of those 4 sided files. I never see them in the nail vids I've been watching though lol
 

RosieR

Active Member
#12
One other thing... I could find a file at the time but I'm guessing I could have smoothed out the ridges a bit? I have one of those 4 sided files. I never see them in the nail vids I've been watching though lol
Generally toes don't need filing to smooth them as it really can damage the nail plate and encourage fungal nail/bacterial infections more easily. I have probably only filed one or two clients odd nails that's all if there is a significant ridge on them. I was never taught to buff toes or fingernails receiving a normal manicure or pedicure just to clarify.
However buffing with a sponge buffer ( gold or pink one) as is used in gel nails is done, but I don't buff toes that are having gel applied....that's just my way and I prefer it. You must do as the course says naturally.
Little toe nails have sometimes an extra bit of hard nail just on the outer edge of the nail, which is more like a hard callus. It can become quite painful. I trim carefully with cuticle nippers or use my Mr. Pumice very carefully to remove it. I am an experienced pedicurist so until you know what you are doing please don't try the nippers.
HTH
 

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#13
Generally toes don't need filing to smooth them as it really can damage the nail plate and encourage fungal nail/bacterial infections more easily. I have probably only filed one or two clients odd nails that's all if there is a significant ridge on them. I was never taught to buff toes or fingernails receiving a normal manicure or pedicure just to clarify.
However buffing with a sponge buffer ( gold or pink one) as is used in gel nails is done, but I don't buff toes that are having gel applied....that's just my way and I prefer it. You must do as the course says naturally.
Little toe nails have sometimes an extra bit of hard nail just on the outer edge of the nail, which is more like a hard callus. It can become quite painful. I trim carefully with cuticle nippers or use my Mr. Pumice very carefully to remove it. I am an experienced pedicurist so until you know what you are doing please don't try the nippers.
HTH
Thanks so much for the helpful information. I did her toes again with great success last night. Can't wait to learn more and get better. I do have nippers and just practice on myself a little bit but didn't do too much. I could see how easily they could cause pain.

Great info on the little toe nails!
 

RosieR

Active Member
#14
The little toe nail deformity is quite common:- So i guess not really a deformity as such, It is an inherited trait more often found in women. They can be very painful when they grow and get pressure from shoes.
Called an accessory nail or double nail. Can alo be confused as a Lister's corn if my memory serves me right.
 

Titleist

The illest Pro V1x
#15
The little toe nail deformity is quite common:- So i guess not really a deformity as such, It is an inherited trait more often found in women. They can be very painful when they grow and get pressure from shoes.
Called an accessory nail or double nail. Can alo be confused as a Lister's corn if my memory serves me right.
That's some great info. Can't wait to learn more. Just waiting to hear back from the school about financial aid and hopefully get started.
 
Top