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Patch Tests

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mel

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I WAS READING THE THREADS ABOUT PATCH TESTING AND THEY ALL SEEM TO BE SAYING THE SAME DO NOT PATCH TEST, I GOT TOLD WHEN I DID MY TRAINING TO DO A PATCH TEST AND IF THE CLIENT REFUSES ASK THEM TO SIGN AND SAY THEY HAVE REFUSED OR REFUSE TO TREAT THEM,I HAVE NOT STARTED TO WORK HAS YET JUST DO FRIENDS AND FAMILY. I AM THINKING OF GOING WITH PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY INSURANCE AND THEIR LEAFLET SAYS YOU MUST CHECK THAT THE CLIENT IS NOT ALLERGIC TO ACRYLICS PLASTICS PROIR TO APPLYING FALSE NAILS OR NAIL EXTENSIONS. COULD ANYONE EXPLAIN HOW TO DO THIS. I DO NOT KNOW HOW TO GO ABOUT IT THANKS.
 

Lellipop

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I don't think there is any need to patch test before applying nail enhancements. For a start we are taught not to get monomer onto a clients skin, And to patch test you would need to do just that :rolleyes:
I dont know which company you were taught by, But i don't think their advice is safe.
I would just do a client consulation card and ask about allergys, rashes etc
then decide if there are any problems before doing the nails.
 

talented talons

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I agree with Lesley on this, you shouldn't put monomer on a clients skin deliberately. As Lesley said do a consultation and fill out a client card which should include questions on allergies etc. I always ask my clients have they had enhancements before and have they had any reactions to them?

If they sign it and say no, then if something untoward happens its completely down to the client, so no come back on you.
 

Carole Lindsay

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I think I was taught to do patch tests of the person is prone to allergic reactions generally and has had a reaction to a particular type of enhancement in the past. As far as how you stand with insurance, i cant help you but all i can say is that a lot of the people on this board use Professional Beauty for their insurance!
 

Nailsinlondon1

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First of all, if you ever need to do a patch test for enhancements never use uncured product on the skin...............
I have only ever had to do this a couple of times, and it was for clients that seemed to be allergic to anything and everything........
Very unusual!!!!!
But then there are always some unusual people out there......lol

The way to do it safley is....... take a hypoallergenic plaster...........apply a bead and let it cure, when it is fully cured apply the plaster to the skin.

Gel apply gel to the plaster, cure for the full time and then wipe off the inhibition layer , then apply plaster.....

For fibreglass, apply the resin to the plaster let it dry naturaly and then apply when dry to the skin..............
leave the plast on for 24 hours and check for any irritation on the skin.
This way you area testing the client for sensitivity to fully cured enhancements...... no product should ever tough the skin............

just my tuppence on this
 

The Geek

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You can not do an acurate patch test on an individual. Professional monomers contain many differing contents and therefore it is impossible to narrow down a reaction to certain elements of a formulation simply by swabbing monomer on the elbow.
As was previously mentioned, it is considered to be negligent use of any system to apply product directly to skin. If you want to do a proper patch test, you will need to consult a derm and the company itself. They can provide unlabeled patches for testing,
As far as using cured product, the chances of anyone ever experiencing a reation to cured (inert) product is next to none. Otherwise many would break out whenever they touched most plastics.
Also, remember that reactions are localised. If someone breaks out around the eponychium whenever monomer is applied in that area, they may well not have any problems with a patch applied to their arm.

In a nutshell, there is little you can do to regularly patvh test every client. I would only advise looking into it if the client exhibits reactions to many other types of products.

Hope this helps :D
 

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