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Questions on the prep tutorial

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Nails at Home

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Have just read Mr Geek's prep tutorial which I found very educational indeed! Have a couple of questions on it though - the first being where he mentioned:-

"Before you ask (and I knew you would)… no, I don’t file side to centre. The reason being is that derms are now suggesting that using gentle motions and a gentle abrasive in a back and forth direction on the natural nail free edge actually helps to prevent splitting and peeling of the natural nail plate."

So, does this mean that the way we've been taught to file - i.e. not use the file like a saw is now not the correct way? Should we now be using back and forth filing motions rather than always filing in one direction?

The other questions I've got is regarding this quote:-

"If I am Sculpting on a form, I ensure that the corners of the free edge are not overly curled. Curled free edges suck as they have a tendency to warp your form fit."

What if the client naturally has very curly nails?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated

Thanks
Michelle
If I am applying a tip and an overlay, I round the free edge of the natural nail plate to conform to the stop point of my tip.
 

geeg

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Nails at Home said:
So, does this mean that the way we've been taught to file - i.e. not use the file like a saw is now not the correct way? Should we now be using back and forth filing motions rather than always filing in one direction?

The other questions I've got is regarding this quote:-

"If I am Sculpting on a form, I ensure that the corners of the free edge are not overly curled. Curled free edges suck as they have a tendency to warp your form fit."

What if the client naturally has very curly nails?
1. Once upon a time, abrasives were made of sandpaper which was a bit harsh on the natural nail and tended to rip it up.
Today abrasives are made of much finer material and studies have shown (studies carried out by Doug Schoon) that gentle filing back and forth with a soft abrasive can actually seal the free edge of the natural nail.
Education in colleges etc. has not caught up with new technology yet.

2. It is easy to take away some of the excess curling of a natural nail by shortening it before you apply the form. The form fits better and it is easier to sculpt.
 
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