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Scratch Article - NSS & NVQ etc.

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naturalnails

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In the Scratch mag there was a letter from Anonymous Veteran Nail tech about the NSS etc. I dont know who wrote it but I want them to know that I agree.

The gist of the letter was to suggest we had a board of examiners and a committment oath which we could all sign up to.

I think that there has been so much discussion over the years about the NVQ and how we all may need to have this piece of paper. How many of you out there have done your NVQ and feel it is not worth the paper it is written on. I know there will be lots of you who had great teachers and greatly value your qualification but unfortunately you will be in the minority rather than the majority. If the NVQ is to be the be all and end all then why are we expected to still also immediately do further training to buy products. Because the NVQ in a lot of places is not good enough - yes.

I just feel that there have been so many people who have said they went to college to get their NVQ or VTCT and feel they really have not learnt enough to get out there. But at the end of the day, if the legislation was in place tomorrow then these techs would be granted licences before someone who has been in the industry for many years and has say a Creative Master Cert or EZ Flow Master Artist. Does this make sense? I know that the NVQ was written based round these courses but it comes down to each teachers interpretation of the words. They are not all singing from the same hymn sheet, I fear. To have knowledge of something will mean different things to different people LOL

I for one would be all for an Association which we join and make it very "in the public eye" to look for a technician who was a member of this Association.

If you were looking for a tradesman, it is preferrable to seek one with a trade membership.

I dont know how it could work from a logistical or financial point of view but, it could be linked with our insurance possibly. The Association should have a list of acceptable training. For private trainers, they could submit their course criteria and if it meets the spec then they would be on the list.

I just feel there are so many great techs out there that for whatever reason may not be able to find somewhere suitable to do their NVQ.

I have put my tin hat on to receive all the flack for this but I think we need to all be more proactive and raise the standards in our industry.

This is certainly the place to start.
 

ruthie

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Yay - I'm all for an association - definately

The nail industry seems to be one on its own - its a bit like a driving test - once you've passed your driving test then you really start learning to drive a car! Think about how you were when you'd first passed and how you are now!

People doing massage, waxing etc can produce good results immediately they have completed their training to a reasonable standard. Nails however are not like that - there is a need for constant practice and continued development - and that is just to provide a good service. Is this because nail enhancements is a relatively new service (I mean compared to massage etc) - people are still discovering new techniques, new products etc. - I don't know - just musing!

I for one would sign up to an association. Don't we already have ANT? Could they not be elevated and encouraged to take up a more full role? It seems silly to set up something new if we already have something that with a bit of tweaking could do the job. How would it be managed? Trade tests? We all know that exams aren't the only way to prove competance (and often not the best!). It would be importanct to ensure that people weren't excluded from joining because of prohibitive costs etc (mean person that I am!)

Who is it that decides the fates of nail techs? Is it BABTAC or Government or someone else?
 

Hollyballoo

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naturalnails said:
If the NVQ is to be the be all and end all then why are we expected to still also immediately do further training to buy products. Because the NVQ in a lot of places is not good enough - yes.
Hi Fiona

Just to jump in here...while I agree with the majority of what you are saying, I don't think the comment above is completely accurate. Whilst I do agree that a large number of people have not have the benefit of being taught to a wholly satisfactory standard by their colleges for VTCT, NVQ qualifications (me included!), I do not believe that we are then required to undertake company training wholly on the basis that the company does not believe the NVQ or other certification is to the required standard.

The company's requirement that you train in the use of their product is quite understandable - I'm certain that even if there was a 5 year degree course, you would still be required to undertake product training! Not all companies' products are the same and, after all, if you put yourself in their shoes, would you really want to just sell your product off the shelf to someone without providing education in its proper use and not try to ensure that they are using the products correctly and effectively? After all, a company will want to protect its good name (one would hope!) - it is all too easy for a nail tech to blame the product for poor performance and durability and not themself and that is not good business for the company.

If there is any nail association that should be set up, it is to bring the NVQ trainers/teachers up to standard because that is, for the most part, where the problems are! Too many colleges are just too greedy and fill and quite often over-subscribe their courses and install certain teachers/trainers without having ensured that they are to the required standard. For me personally, it was very difficult to learn a great deal in a class of 22, but even worse to be taught by someone who (1) was not a good teacher and (2) appeared to have learned some very odd and dubious techniques that she was in turn passing on to her class! But, like everything, this is not always the case and there are some very fortunate ex-students out there who have gained a great deal from their college course. I do think there should be far more emphasis on getting these colleges up to scratch before anything else.
 

naturalnails

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Hollyballoo said:
The company's requirement that you train in the use of their product is quite understandable - I'm certain that even if there was a 5 year degree course, you would still be required to undertake product training! Not all companies' products are the same and, after all, if you put yourself in their shoes, would you really want to just sell your product off the shelf to someone without providing education in its proper use and not try to ensure that they are using the products correctly and effectively? After all, a company will want to protect its good name (one would hope!) - it is all too easy for a nail tech to blame the product for poor performance and durability and not themself and that is not good business for the company.
Hi Paola

I agree that the Companies should protect their reputation - that was not what I meant.

I am more in favour of the training being done by people who know their art - ie. Company trainers rather than sometimes not so good college tutors.


Sorry for confusion.
 

Hollyballoo

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naturalnails said:
I am more in favour of the training being done by people who know their art - ie. Company trainers rather than sometimes not so good college tutors.
Absolutely Fiona, I totally agree - I do think a couple of product companies are already looking into the idea of running accredited NVQ courses now aren't they? Trouble is, for the trainee, this will mean paying a lot more than at present because presumably it would require a lengthier training period and far more in the way of assessment/homework assignments over a length of time. Though, if it means you achieve very high nail tech standards with an "official" qualifiation to boot, it has to be worth it.
 
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