Waxing brows - blister

#1
Hi just a quick questions and if this has happened to anyone?

Had a regular client for waxing brows, she sensitive brows goes red but then dies down. Did them and the next day she came up with a blister under one brow. The temperature was fine I check every time, I stretched the skin I did everything I do for everyone else and this happened! I told her to put some cold compress and aloe Vera to soothe, it kind of looks like a reaction if anything! Stressing me out thank you for any replies!
 

Ruby S

Active Member
#2
Yes this happened to one of my regulars a couple of times... I actually stopped waxing her brows for a while and when I eventually did them again I plucked with tweezers for a few times. She may have changed her medication or perhaps exfoliated the area and the skin was either more sensitive or thinner than it has been in the past? Skin can change and we should be vigilant with consultations to make sure that nothing has changed. Unfortunately these things sometimes do just happen. Don’t stress too much.
 

#3
Yes this happened to one of my regulars a couple of times... I actually stopped waxing her brows for a while and when I eventually did them again I plucked with tweezers for a few times. She may have changed her medication or perhaps exfoliated the area and the skin was either more sensitive or thinner than it has been in the past? Skin can change and we should be vigilant with consultations to make sure that nothing has changed. Unfortunately these things sometimes do just happen. Don’t stress too much.
Thank you for your reply! This makes me feel a little better! I have been doing this for 3 years nothing like this ever happened! How long did it take for it to go down? She does have very sensitive skin in general normally it just goes red, but this time the blister came up, I’m going to message tomorrow and see how she is and see if it’s gone down a little.
 

Ruby S

Active Member
#4
I can’t remember how long it took to go but I suspect just a few days. If she’s doing what you told her to do it should heal over soon. Is she giving you a hard time about it?
Some clients are so fixated on having a treatment done whether it suits their skin or not, so she may try and talk you into doing it again soon because “it’ll be ok...” don’t let her persuade you to do anything until you do a full consultation and patch test on the area.
 

#5
I can’t remember how long it took to go but I suspect just a few days. If she’s doing what you told her to do it should heal over soon. Is she giving you a hard time about it?
Some clients are so fixated on having a treatment done whether it suits their skin or not, so she may try and talk you into doing it again soon because “it’ll be ok...” don’t let her persuade you to do anything until you do a full consultation and patch test on the area.
No she’s actually been so lovely about it! I did tell her that it must be my wax that your now having a reaction to even though it’s the same one from before so I would either suggest not waxing them and just plucking instead or she really wants them waxed then maybe go somewhere else where they use another wax because I’m not risking that change of it happening again! Even if I do a patch test and it’s fine and then happens again I don’t want to put myself or the client through that! It’s such a risky situation and I’m the type of person that overthinks and worries
 

RosieR

Well-Known Member
#6
Hormones, sunbeds, medication, and sometimes the menopause may make the skin more prone to problems. You are not the only person that questions , overthinks and worries about what you have done. It's part of being a caring professional that wants to cause zero harm to any of our clients. If you didn't care you wouldn't strive to be good at your job.
Plucking would suffice, and yes it could happen again, but if it was my client I would prefer to keep her and treat her as a special case and suggest she is better off with you than going else where because you can modify your treatment and really be aware of her delicate skin. She has developed a trust in you and you can work together to work out what it was.
Patch test obviously as is suggested. Then when yours and her confidence is returned try again or just continue plucking.
Good luck
RosieR
 

#7
Hormones, sunbeds, medication, and sometimes the menopause may make the skin more prone to problems. You are not the only person that questions , overthinks and worries about what you have done. It's part of being a caring professional that wants to cause zero harm to any of our clients. If you didn't care you wouldn't strive to be good at your job.
Plucking would suffice, and yes it could happen again, but if it was my client I would prefer to keep her and treat her as a special case and suggest she is better off with you than going else where because you can modify your treatment and really be aware of her delicate skin. She has developed a trust in you and you can work together to work out what it was.
Patch test obviously as is suggested. Then when yours and her confidence is returned try again or just continue plucking.
Good luck
RosieR
Thank you for your reply! Honestly it’s the worse feeling knowing something has happened. Once it has fully healed I will explain to her that it is her skin and all the factors and what we can do, and if she does decide to go somewhere else then fair enough, but your right it’s just the skin and what can I do! I feel a little better today she said it’s a bit better today so that a good sign I was just thinking all sorts in my head! I think I just need to not let this knock me down as I don’t want it affecting future clients.
 

House Beauty

Well-Known Member
#8
Hi just a quick questions and if this has happened to anyone?

Had a regular client for waxing brows, she sensitive brows goes red but then dies down. Did them and the next day she came up with a blister under one brow. The temperature was fine I check every time, I stretched the skin I did everything I do for everyone else and this happened! I told her to put some cold compress and aloe Vera to soothe, it kind of looks like a reaction if anything! Stressing me out thank you for any replies!
It’s will be ok. It’s a contra action to waxing so make sure you list all possible outcomes of a wax both normal and not pleasant beforehand.

Skin removal - Strip Waxing removes a layer of skin, like exfoliation. A shiny patch of tender, raw skin is a sign that the uppermost layers of the epidermis have been removed by the wax, resulting in a superficial graze. This is especially prone to happen where your skin is dry or fragile. Pre-wax oil is a wonderful way to help avoid this and is used in all areas but cannot prevent it completely. Your therapist generally won't need to wax any area more than once, but some stubborn hairs need a little extra oomph and may get a second pass. If there are any obvious hairs left after waxing, the tweezers will come out or if you are new to waxing you will be advised to leave them until next time you have a wax to get you into a hair growth cycle routine.. Certain medications (including Roaccutane, topical acne products such as Retin-A and Differin, steroid creams and medication) can also cause dryness and fragility of the skin. Always wait at least 3 months after finishing a course of topical acne or steroid medication, and 6 months after any systemic medication before waxing. To treat: clean the affected area and apply a cold compress for 10 minutes, then dry the skin and apply a clean, fluff-free dressing to prevent infection. Remove after 3-4 days. Minor grazes can be left to air-dry after application of a cold compress, but advise the client to visit their pharmacist who will be able to recommend an appropriate product to assist the healing process. In all cases, clients should seek the advice of their doctor if the injury shows any signs of infection.
 

TheDuchess

Well-Known Member
#9
Super knowledge and advice here.
 
Top