Wella KP and grey coverage in wildly different hair textures

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NightinEv

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Hey all.

So I'm about to finish hair school and color is by far my favorite part, even before I enrolled I was learning theory. I've had no issues with grey coverage in the dozens of models we've had, even on really light levels. However, before I was in school I ran into a situation like three times and the issue is I'm not sure I'd know exactly what to do right now, either.

Before I entered school I had already messed around with both my own hair and other people's color-wise. Something I was totally ignorant about (the need to learn hadn't really been there except for a single occasion which I'll mention later on) was grey coverage. As we started getting clients with lots of greys I kind of got the hang of it for "normal" scenarios - so far, so good. I also had done tons of e-learning that Wella offers online, and it's a brand I like (wild diversity of options in my opinion, allows for all types of creativity).

So, I had tried to cover grays on my stepdad, and it only worked once after I had already done other stuff on his hair with bleach (even then, some greys still held on!). Looking back, when I solely wanted to cover the gray I did it all wrong, but my issue is that even now I'm not sure I'd be able to do it - problem is he has baby fine hair where it still has color, but in places in which it's all grey (from right above ears to nape) it's *coarse* and I mean coarse, unlike anything I've seen in any model or client. Even seen from afar it's a completely different texture, like a guitar string. Using Wella's system in Koleston Perfect, I would do 77/0 or 77/02 (dislikes warm tones) with maybe 9% peroxide (just to secure coverage, or even maybe 6% and 9% 50/50) on these areas, but for the areas in which he has pigment (fine strands) the appropriate choice would definitely be 7/ + 7/1 with 6% (1/3 of the undertone to slightly counteract copper tones since his hair is what I'd describe as a 6 1/2 with like 50% grey, so there would be some underlying pigment exposed). People have told me XX/ in Wella on fine hair will look two levels darker and I can see why that would happen. Would I need to do two formulas (something my teacher always discouraged me to do but I see no problem with)? If so, how would I know exactly how to "transition" these areas and make sure the color would come out homogenous? Is pre-softening effective in cases in which there's a brutal difference in texture, and if so, would I still use the 77/0 after pre-softening? How would you go about this?

Thanks in advance!
 
Hey all.

So I'm about to finish hair school and color is by far my favorite part, even before I enrolled I was learning theory. I've had no issues with grey coverage in the dozens of models we've had, even on really light levels. However, before I was in school I ran into a situation like three times and the issue is I'm not sure I'd know exactly what to do right now, either.

Before I entered school I had already messed around with both my own hair and other people's color-wise. Something I was totally ignorant about (the need to learn hadn't really been there except for a single occasion which I'll mention later on) was grey coverage. As we started getting clients with lots of greys I kind of got the hang of it for "normal" scenarios - so far, so good. I also had done tons of e-learning that Wella offers online, and it's a brand I like (wild diversity of options in my opinion, allows for all types of creativity).

So, I had tried to cover grays on my stepdad, and it only worked once after I had already done other stuff on his hair with bleach (even then, some greys still held on!). Looking back, when I solely wanted to cover the gray I did it all wrong, but my issue is that even now I'm not sure I'd be able to do it - problem is he has baby fine hair where it still has color, but in places in which it's all grey (from right above ears to nape) it's *coarse* and I mean coarse, unlike anything I've seen in any model or client. Even seen from afar it's a completely different texture, like a guitar string. Using Wella's system in Koleston Perfect, I would do 77/0 or 77/02 (dislikes warm tones) with maybe 9% peroxide (just to secure coverage, or even maybe 6% and 9% 50/50) on these areas, but for the areas in which he has pigment (fine strands) the appropriate choice would definitely be 7/ + 7/1 with 6% (1/3 of the undertone to slightly counteract copper tones since his hair is what I'd describe as a 6 1/2 with like 50% grey, so there would be some underlying pigment exposed). People have told me XX/ in Wella on fine hair will look two levels darker and I can see why that would happen. Would I need to do two formulas (something my teacher always discouraged me to do but I see no problem with)? If so, how would I know exactly how to "transition" these areas and make sure the color would come out homogenous? Is pre-softening effective in cases in which there's a brutal difference in texture, and if so, would I still use the 77/0 after pre-softening? How would you go about this?

Thanks in advance!
Hey, this is fun!
What a great bit of learning to do, and as it's your stepdad I assume he'll be slightly more relaxed than a regular paying client.

Firstly: I disagree with your teacher: different starting points need different mixtures.

I'd start with what you think is right on the regular areas then the 77/0 or 77/02 with 6% as that's Wella recommendation.
The intense needs to be applied first to allow the extra development time.

You can't really blend the areas other than to section resistant from regular and apply. If in doubt, I'd put regular on first then add the 77/ on top.

Once you've developed you can see the result and decide if you need to adjust next time.

Pre-softening seems to be 2 different things; applying liquid 6% and drying in before applying colour.
We did this in the 90's; not sure how effective it is as peroxide is acid.

Other method is to apply very thinly, neat colour, from the tube..it's highly alkaline so will open the cuticle and has added more colour molecules to expand when adding the colour mixture over the top .

This is brilliant learning for you; please feedback so we can learn too!

Have fun,
A
 
Thank you for the reply!

My teacher has a marked preference for form (cutting & styling) and he's more old-school. I disagree with him there too: even with an homogenous starting point, I see colorists using different formulas for whichever effect they want and I think you're very limited when you can only do one. Some models have left unsatisfied when they wanted fiery red hair color (say a 5.66) but had a band of grey hairs in a specific place and otherwise almost no grey - at his command I would use so much neutral base in the mix for taking into account the band of greying that the undertone would be really subtle. He also thinks demi-permanent color products are a marketing ploy and I've had great success with them, it's not quite the same as his "glossing" technique of extremely watered down oxidant mixed with permanent color. Color Touch in the situations I mentioned with some models, after depositing the base, could have given the red extra kick.

You're right too with the 6% - it's Schwarzkopf that tells you to use 9% with reinforced pigments but that doesn't mean I should disregard Wella instructions.

Regarding the pre-softening, being honest I never saw much of a result with the peroxide method, especially given that they tell you to use low volume. 12% alone will lift natural hair with the scalp heat, but it's damaging and even using lower volumes I can only conceive it if you'd rinse off the developer and dry the hair before applying the color, as random peroxide below the color would dilute it (I think). I might try the softening with color method.

In your approach, why the regular mix and then the reinforced base on top and not the opposite?

If I can convince him and get a decent result I'll report back and could even add it to my portfolio haha
 
Thank you for the reply!

My teacher has a marked preference for form (cutting & styling) and he's more old-school. I disagree with him there too: even with an homogenous starting point, I see colorists using different formulas for whichever effect they want and I think you're very limited when you can only do one. Some models have left unsatisfied when they wanted fiery red hair color (say a 5.66) but had a band of grey hairs in a specific place and otherwise almost no grey - at his command I would use so much neutral base in the mix for taking into account the band of greying that the undertone would be really subtle. He also thinks demi-permanent color products are a marketing ploy and I've had great success with them, it's not quite the same as his "glossing" technique of extremely watered down oxidant mixed with permanent color. Color Touch in the situations I mentioned with some models, after depositing the base, could have given the red extra kick.

You're right too with the 6% - it's Schwarzkopf that tells you to use 9% with reinforced pigments but that doesn't mean I should disregard Wella instructions.

Regarding the pre-softening, being honest I never saw much of a result with the peroxide method, especially given that they tell you to use low volume. 12% alone will lift natural hair with the scalp heat, but it's damaging and even using lower volumes I can only conceive it if you'd rinse off the developer and dry the hair before applying the color, as random peroxide below the color would dilute it (I think). I might try the softening with color method.

In your approach, why the regular mix and then the reinforced base on top and not the opposite?

If I can convince him and get a decent result I'll report back and could even add it to my portfolio haha
Lovely stuff.

In answer, I'd always apply the less intense/ softer mixture first as that would to a greater or lesser degree shield the normal hair from the more intense version

Theoretically your colour result would then be more likely not to over process or over time.

I agree with you about the peroxide pre-softening.
I have used the pre-colour method but I found it mucky and quite hard work.

I'm also going to say that probably 60% of my colour work involves demi permanent.
The gloss, soft fade and easy application are lovely to work with and enhances any colour balancing.

If you're in the UK Wella do provide lots on mainly online training for free.

Obvs you sign up with them but it's a great resource to gather more knowledge.

Good for you!
 
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