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why do nss nails stick so well

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angel fingers

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ive just started a new gig part time, and i'm situated very near to 2 nss salons. although ive only been there 2 days,ive had a few clients from the other salons call in for price lists. one lady had some really ugly nails done on her. you could see the fill lines and they were very bulky. she told me that the techs dont file down before they re apply. and that her nails were prepared with a drill. i asked if they file off lifting areas before infilling and she said 'oh they never lift' . infact most stuff that ive seen come out of these places although its not atractive to look at and not applied safely never lifts. why is this? im concerned that if i start doing these ladies that although i know i can do safer more atractive nails that if they get a bit of lifting they will think im not as good as the nss shops :confused:
 

The Geek

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Hey there. If they dont lift... whats with the Fill lines? They most likely just dont bother to do anything about it... just 'fill' over it.
The reason why people think they hold onton the plate so well is because they shred to poop out of the natural nails before the product is applied.
Anything will stick well to a surface like that ;)
 

rafiki

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". . . because they shred to poop out of the natural nails before the product is applied. Anything will stick well to a surface like that"

So, their prep, electric filing of the nail, is what makes the product not lift. I am returning to the salon and recognize that about a certain ethnic group of people doing nails in the U.S. They don't lift. Gotta give 'em props for that. Soooo, the question is, can I find a prep for the nail, which won't tear it up, that will not promote lifing? That's the key.

I have settled on Tammy Taylor acrylic products. According to my rep, Tory, if I do the nails exactly in the video, he "guaranteed they will not lift". We shall see, we shall see. My supplies and video should arrive any day now. Can't wait to find out.
 

The Geek

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There are two types of adhesion that products use to 'stick' to the nail:
Natural (chemical attraction)
Mechanical (Interweaving)

Interweaving is where the product weaves or pressees into any anchorage point in the natural nail plate. The more anchorage points, the more effective the interweaving. The more you shred and rough up the surface of the natural nail plate, the more anchorage points you leave behind for the interweaving process. The downside of course is that you thin out and damage the natural nail plate itself.

There are various types of chemical bonds that form between your products and the natural nail plate. The vast majority of these are hydrogen bonds, but some (depending on your products chemistry) can be covalent (which are much stronger). The good side about chemical bonding is that you can acheive adhesion without any damage to the natrual nail plate. The down side is that your PREP must be good as oil and conaminants block the product from bonding to the plate.

In my opinion, a Chemical bond is the best way to go as it doesnt damage the nail plate and leaves you with a better, longer lasting bond.
Personally, I find it highly unethical to do anything to the natural nail that would thin or damage it, however, many are not bothered as long as the product sticks for them.
 

rafiki

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I like the sound of this. Doesn't it stand to reason that any intelligent tech would?

The $1,000,000 question. What product fits the bill? Where can it be purchased (US stateside)? Any guidance would be appreciated.

I start in the salon in a few weeks, fyi.


The Nail Geek said:
There are two types of adhesion that products use to 'stick' to the nail:

Natural (chemical attraction)
Mechanical (Interweaving)

In my opinion, a Chemical bond is the best way to go as it doesnt damage the nail plate and leaves you with a better, longer lasting bond.
Personally, I find it highly unethical to do anything to the natural nail that would thin or damage it, however, many are not bothered as long as the product sticks for them.
 
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