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Intellectually Disabled Client

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trusty754

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I have a client that is Intellectually disabled, i am seeing her for the first time tomorrow, she is a bit of a challenge as she has had nails in the past and loves them but like to pick them off, any advice on how to handle this situation. I want to do a good job for her but would like to be able to encourage her to not pick them.
 

Katelisa

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what do you mean by intellectually disabled?
 

sodabubble

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thats just what I was thinking! Does she have any kind of learning difficulties? If so, is it her carer that brings her in?
 

trusty754

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she has her carer bringing her in, apparantley her attention span is very limited. i dont know how else to put it.
 

*JOANNE*

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make sure your prep and application are spot on( as normal) ...if the is any slight lifting then the temptation will be too great.
also keep them quite short....................
thats it ...no biggy sounds... like she may be used to sitting through the process if the lady has had enhancements before she should be fine whilst your doing them.
 

sodabubble

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do you have an aftercare sheet that perhaps you could give a copy to her and her carer? By the way, I know you meant no harm but the term you used to describe this lady is offensive and incorrect, she has learning difficulties hun xx :hug:
 

*JOANNE*

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do you have an aftercare sheet that perhaps you could give a copy to her and her carer? By the way, I know you meant no harm but the term you used to describe this lady is offensive and incorrect, she has learning difficulties hun xx :hug:
yep...aftercare leaflet read out to your client and given to her carer....
 

soriminah

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Theres a young woman who comes into work with her carer who has Down Syndrome and she has fantastic looking enhancements. Give her an aftercare brochure and explain she cannot pick at them and hopefully she'll be ok.
 

Susie H

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Tell her:eek:
Don't pick or I won't be able to do them again, then sell/give (I would give) her a pinkie bottle of solar oil and go through the routine of how she should use it. Also hand cream, so in effect she can give her self a mini manicure every day.
If she has something constructive to do with her nails, perhaps it will encourage her to not be destructive.
There is a lady here in N'ton that I used to pick up in the taxi and take to her day center who had the most amazing nails, she couldn't sit up straight in her chair and you had to have patience to speak with her, like with a stroke victim, and a lot of peeps had the impression that you should just speak to her carer.
Carer's don't make the choices for their resident, so if she is aware enough to want her nails done then she deserves to have you communicate with her on a level footing.
Don't forget to ask if she wants nail art, that to might help her not to pick.
 

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