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Olaplex vs competitors: reasons why

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DarrenL

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Hey guys I'm a new member of this forum and I need information about this concept so bad.
England is quite a virgin market for this. (compared to US).
I am now planning to introduce Olaplex concept in my small town salon and I'm looking around for the right choice.
Here we have different other brands with different prices, and I really need a technical and tangible reason (not a marketing one) in order to justify such a premium price to my customers who are not so well-informed about this yet.

Thank you very much, have a good morning!
 

daydreams01

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I'm following this too as I am also in the process of trying out the different products while deciding what to do. I am a bit confused about what an olaplex sales rep said to me yesterday at salon tho when I bought my pack so hopefully someone more knowledgeable can help. ( I am not trying to slate olaplex or any of the companies tho & don't want to create another heated thread on this topic, I just have a genuine question!)
She said I need to buy no 3 for clients to use at home as the bonds will gradually break down again through heat styling etc. I get that to a degree but in the package, there isn't any info on how it works, just instructions but it clearly states it 'rebuilds disulphide bonds'.
It was my understanding that the temporary hydrogen bonds get broken and reformed during the styling process but that the disulphide bonds can only get broken with an alkali product e.g perm lotion etc. so just curious as to if these disulphide bonds are truly getting rebuilt during olaplex treatment, it obviously isn't a permanent fix if the no 3 is needed to maintain it if they can get broken that easily with heat styling afterwards. In which case, that was their main selling point over the competitors saying that the other copycat products out there were just a temporary fix compared to olaplex.

I'm looking forward to using it but think I am gonna find it hard persuading clients to pay extra to cover my costs and then pay more for the no3 to use at home!
 

DarrenL

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thank you very much @daydreams01 !
At least I am not the only one facing this issue.

I joined this forum also because I saw that sometimes professionals from Olaplex replies directly to threads... I hope this is one of those times!

What I mean is that also other brands claim the same things of Olaplex.
The only real different thing is about patents. I'm aware that this is a really difficult field to discuss about and I'm worried to write something uncorrect: Can someone patent basic ingredients (like Maleic acid)? I mean, you can't patent sodium chloide... it's just cooking salt!
For example, Fibreplex from Schwarzkopf shows great results and the company is completely reliable. Also customers recognize it as super reliable.
 

Steven Robertson

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Hey guys I'm a new member of this forum and I need information about this concept so bad.
England is quite a virgin market for this. (compared to US).
I am now planning to introduce Olaplex concept in my small town salon and I'm looking around for the right choice.
Here we have different other brands with different prices, and I really need a technical and tangible reason (not a marketing one) in order to justify such a premium price to my customers who are not so well-informed about this yet.

Thank you very much, have a good morning!
I'm following this too as I am also in the process of trying out the different products while deciding what to do. I am a bit confused about what an olaplex sales rep said to me yesterday at salon tho when I bought my pack so hopefully someone more knowledgeable can help. ( I am not trying to slate olaplex or any of the companies tho & don't want to create another heated thread on this topic, I just have a genuine question!)
She said I need to buy no 3 for clients to use at home as the bonds will gradually break down again through heat styling etc. I get that to a degree but in the package, there isn't any info on how it works, just instructions but it clearly states it 'rebuilds disulphide bonds'.
It was my understanding that the temporary hydrogen bonds get broken and reformed during the styling process but that the disulphide bonds can only get broken with an alkali product e.g perm lotion etc. so just curious as to if these disulphide bonds are truly getting rebuilt during olaplex treatment, it obviously isn't a permanent fix if the no 3 is needed to maintain it if they can get broken that easily with heat styling afterwards. In which case, that was their main selling point over the competitors saying that the other copycat products out there were just a temporary fix compared to olaplex.

I'm looking forward to using it but think I am gonna find it hard persuading clients to pay extra to cover my costs and then pay more for the no3 to use at home!
Hi!

I'll stay pretty chill here, as @daydreams01 has been on a thread with me and Olaplex going a little. Sorry about that @daydreams01!!!! I'll keep it classy this time! I can answer most of your questions, however, I don't work for Olaplex or any other brand to give by-the-book information. I'm sure either will give their input once they see the thread, which is fine! I used Olaplex in the salon for about 8 or so months in the salon. It was great in the beginning! Really changed the quality of my bleached clients (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA is like 80% bleach blonde I feel like!). I began to ran in to a bit of a problem with my time frame running being due to the additional processing time Olaplex added to bleaches. So I held off using it, only going to it for major color corrections and on very sensitive hair. So that's that. Olaplex works just like they say it does. Then I was introduced to a brand called colorpHlex by my salon owners who were looking in to distributing it. So I tested it's claims for them on my clients (not extensions) for a couple weeks (I have about 5-9 clients/day). It worked also, minus that I didn't have to increase my processing time or increase developer. So for my business and clients, it made sense timing wise for me to start using colorpHlex, as I could offer it to all my clients, not just ones that were in desperate need, since my timing wouldn't be affected. So that's that! They both work (in my opinion as a stylist). I have not had client's hair fall out from the use of either product (unlike the videos that compare competitors to Olaplex). It's just not a real thing. Olaplex has their patented ingredient, colorpHlex uses a manufacturers ingredient (patented by the manufacturer, not by colorpHlex themselves), that is a naturally-derived vegetable protein molecule. From a cost standpoint, we figured out that colorpHlex is about US$1.90 per application, whereas Olaplex is close to US$4.00. So again, business-wise, it made more sense to use the competitor colorpHlex, given that they both effectively treated my clients hair the same. (See attached photos).

As per @daydreams01 experience with the sales rep. They're technically correct, although it's not a fault of any product. Disulphide bonds will break down over time regardless if Olaplex or colorpHlex was used. She probably just didn't present that information in the best way. Basically she was saying that heat styling, normal wear and tear, shampoo'ing etc, will cause damage to the hair over time and that the use of Olaplex 3 (as it includes their patented ingredient...the 2nd ingredient listed next to water) as well as colorpHlex's shampoo, conditioner and leave in conditioning spray contains their ColorStrong Complex (the active ingredient in the initial step 1 additive) will help to minimize and/or correct any of that erosion that would naturally happen anyways. Yes, hydrogen bonds get broken and reformed during the wet to dry process which doesn't cause visible physical damage, but over time if you think of simple split ends from heat damage, that damage is a result of broken disulfide bonds. The at home care is used to help prevent visible physical damage from happening to begin with between services.

So there you have it! Two great products! colorpHlex being more sufficient for my personal business for it's efficient speed, non-developer increase, it's step 2 has protein for additional strength (Olaplex does not).

On a side note...I'm pretty certain a major lawsuit is going to be happening between Olaplex and Schwarzkopf for the breach of their patent for the use of maleic acid in Fibreplex, according to the folks at Olaplex saying they'll be prosecuting to the fullest extent of the law...minus the specific company being sued was not mentioned, although Schwarzkopf is the only company that has used Maleic Acid from what I'm aware. We'll see how that outcome happens. I'm not sure what country that lawsuit is taking place in.

Anyways, the end! Sounds a little lengthy and market-y, but it's just my opinion and I hate to see so-called "copy-cats" be destroyed simply because they were developed as a result of a new product.

Steven Robertson
www.stevenrobertsonhair.com
@stevenrobertsonhair
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AbMcDonald

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@daydreams01 As I have mentioned many times over many forums. As for Olaplex,
it doesn't matter what company you hear from. Ingredient decks are unable to show bias. Here is some food for thought from Dr. Eric Pressly "The analogy that I gave when speaking to a bunch of future scientists about Olaplex recently regarding this issue was: Imagine you invent a car, then your competitor has a rock and says that it does the same thing and they push it down a hill and it rolls too. It’s painfully clear the rock is not a car but how do you frame that argument." Several knock offs actually share the same ingredient deck with 3 or 4 more knockoffs private labeled from most likely the same manufacturer. If their chemistry was revolutionary, why would it be under multiple names? If it actually worked, why wouldn't Cosmoprof have brought it on when they had every opportunity prior to launching Olaplex? Marketing and science are two entirely separate things and it's important to recognize that as stylists both for yourself and your clients.


As far as "timing" goes: If you are having any issues with lift or processing time, this can be solved by using less Olaplex. The biggest thing to keep in mind is the fact that lighteners have differing levels of lift. Some being 9+ and others being only 5 levels means Olaplex should be adjusted based on the product you are using.

Adding Olaplex to your lightener is highly important and should be done if possible instead of doing just a treatment after. By adding Olaplex to your lightener, you are able to mitigate damage during the process. Using No.2 after finds more of the disulfide bonds and cross links them back together. By not adding No.1 to your lightener, lightener will in turn do more damage which means the treatment would have to find even more disulfide bonds and cross link them back together.

Olaplex itself will not effect tonality in anyway whatsoever. If you feel you are not getting enough lift and not getting past that "orangey" tone, process longer or cut the amount of Olaplex used in half. This has been used extensively with every single lightener on the market and we want everyone to achieve beautiful results. If 1/8oz is not working for 30-60g with on-scalp application / balayage, cut down to 1/16oz.

As for those working with 40vol as the highest, you have a few different options. The first being that you may process for an additional period of time. If working under time constraints, you may use heat checking every 3-5 minutes as you normally would. Your other option would be to cut the amount of Olaplex down until you find what works based on your personal preferences.

I have experienced every single issue mentioned above myself personally. The most important thing is learning that things can and should be changed based on the products that you are using. When we got the product, there were no directions. I have personally been responsible for having to highlight clients multiple times by adding too much. I've also pushed hair too far as well. This is a learning process for everyone and I ask that you just experiment and find what works!


Again: Dropbox - phlex.mp4


Colorphlex itself, ingredients are as follows: water, hydrolyzed vegetable protein or PG Propyl Silanetriol which is an artificially modified amino acid from vegetables and film forming compound, and phenoxyethanol which is used as a preservative. No real comparison in regards to chemistry versus Olaplex. It also claims to be patented and actually lacks one. As a stylist, I would never buy something from a company who lies to make a profit, and that there is so much proof, you can find on many forums, that it does not hold up and actually damages worse than bleach itself. Protect your clients hair and your reputation as a stylist and find the facts before being sold by someone who if paid to promote. Olaplex has never advertised. The results speak for themselves. I am here simply to help shut down misinformation and provide the actual chemistry so as to help stylists not end up with some of the horror stories I have to hear from "knock off" use on a daily basis.
 

AbMcDonald

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I'm following this too as I am also in the process of trying out the different products while deciding what to do. I am a bit confused about what an olaplex sales rep said to me yesterday at salon tho when I bought my pack so hopefully someone more knowledgeable can help. ( I am not trying to slate olaplex or any of the companies tho & don't want to create another heated thread on this topic, I just have a genuine question!)
She said I need to buy no 3 for clients to use at home as the bonds will gradually break down again through heat styling etc. I get that to a degree but in the package, there isn't any info on how it works, just instructions but it clearly states it 'rebuilds disulphide bonds'.
It was my understanding that the temporary hydrogen bonds get broken and reformed during the styling process but that the disulphide bonds can only get broken with an alkali product e.g perm lotion etc. so just curious as to if these disulphide bonds are truly getting rebuilt during olaplex treatment, it obviously isn't a permanent fix if the no 3 is needed to maintain it if they can get broken that easily with heat styling afterwards. In which case, that was their main selling point over the competitors saying that the other copycat products out there were just a temporary fix compared to olaplex.

I'm looking forward to using it but think I am gonna find it hard persuading clients to pay extra to cover my costs and then pay more for the no3 to use at home!
I'll explain it with color and lightener for you. When peroxide enters the hair to lighten your natural pigments, it also splits disulfide bonds that give the hair strength and integrity. These pairs turn into single sulfur-hydrogen bonds. If one oxygen molecule created by this peroxide reaction links up with a single, that's a perfect pair. However, as some of these oxygen molecules move in packs of three, they can attach to sulfur-hydrogen bonds and trigger a reaction that eats protein out of the hair leaving it dry and frayed. Olaplex eliminates this reaction, creating a new bond that is actually stronger than the original disulfide. This chain with two reactive ends may also find these singles without the presence of peroxide or color in the hair therefore being able to restore the strength, structure and integrity. Hopefully that was in depth enough. Let me know if you have any other question
 

daydreams01

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Thank you all for your detailed responses, really interesting to read and I don't doubt that the products are going to improve the condition and appearance of the hair. Looking forward to trialling olaplex this week, really hope my clients will feel the benefit and be willing to pay the upgrade!
 

Grace_Hair

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@AbMcDonald. I don't want to seem rude. I use and love olaplex. But, your answers are beginning to be a little copy and pasted...
 

Haircutz

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@AbMcDonald. I don't want to seem rude. I use and love olaplex. But, your answers are beginning to be a little copy and pasted...
Why wouldn't she copy and paste?

She's not telling us anything new about the product just repeating what has already been stated on SG and elsewhere for the benefit of those that haven't read about it yet.

@Tori1992, you mentioned on a previous thread about being based in an area where the 'grey trend' is still seen as something new. Every day we get new geeks registering and asking about Olaplex or where can they buy it from etc.

You've just come back from Salon International, so you're ahead of the pack now. ;):cool:
 

Grace_Hair

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Why wouldn't she copy and paste?

She's not telling us anything new about the product just repeating what has already been stated on SG and elsewhere for the benefit of those that haven't read about it yet.

@Tori1992, you mentioned on a previous thread about being based in an area where the 'grey trend' is still seen as something new. Every day we get new geeks registering and asking about Olaplex or where can they buy it from etc.

You've just come back from Salon International, so you're ahead of the pack now. ;):cool:
I know. But sometimes it feels almost a little bit like that is what she's told to say and nothing else. I get that it must be a pain for @AbMcDonald to keep saying the same thing again and again. Just sometimes it feels a little forced. I get that the written word can be interpreted in different ways. Maybe I'm just interpreting it wrong.
 

surf girl

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Nah I just think Abs is very passionate about the product

As soon as protein was mentioned I no longer wanted to try colourphlex, imagine the problems that are going to occur soon from too much protein on bleached hair...
 

tsparker78

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I agree with kahuna. I love olaplex, but I'm getting a bit sick of the same old questions. If you were standing in front of me it would be one thing, but the search function isn't being used and some geeks are hawking other products and trolling. I'd copy and paste too.
 

chris_causey

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Don't bother with Fibrplex, the Schwarzkopf educator said it wasn't as good as their repair rescue conditioner [emoji23][emoji23][emoji23][emoji23]. But he still reckons it's better than olaplex. It's hilarious really watching these other companies trying to sell their "plex" conditioners to people as something new and revolutionary. Yeah, it's so revolutionary you even had rip off the Olaplex name LOL!!
 

Nicolas Joseph

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I just got back from Salon International as well where I saw both Olaplex and Colorphlex on display
and I have to say that they both seem to work quite well. I do like that Colorphlex is a more natural
formula. I'm always going to choose the natural over the chemical if all else is the same..
 

chris_causey

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No I've tried colrplex too and it's a nice conditioner, but does nothing to truly protect hair from breakage except turn it into an oil slick. I'm not a fan. I have only tried colourplex and fibreplex and to be honest if I hadn't been given them free I wouldn't of bothered anyway. Olaplex will always be my one and only, for the simple fact that the company is authentic and a small business. The like of Schwarzkopf and that just think us hairdressers are all idiots, they put plex in the name and try and tell us it's the same thing, well frankly I think that's an insult to us all.
 

Allies dream

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I just got back from Salon International as well where I saw both Olaplex and Colorphlex on display
and I have to say that they both seem to work quite well. I do like that Colorphlex is a more natural
formula. I'm always going to choose the natural over the chemical if all else is the same..
I suggest Nicolas Joseph that you read the information Ab Mcdonald kindly wrote on this thread it clearly is not the same. There is only One Olaplex.
 

Steven Robertson

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I just got back from Salon International as well where I saw both Olaplex and Colorphlex on display
and I have to say that they both seem to work quite well. I do like that Colorphlex is a more natural
formula. I'm always going to choose the natural over the chemical if all else is the same..
I suggest Nicolas Joseph that you read the information Ab Mcdonald kindly wrote on this thread it clearly is not the same. There is only One Olaplex.
I will agree with Allies here. The products are formulated completely different. So there really is only one Olaplex...and one ColorpHlex. Both have their purposes and benefits, pros and cons, and I find they both work beautifully. So not the same, but you'll be happy I believe with either choice that you make!
 

Scott Breed

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@daydreams01 As I have mentioned many times over many forums. As for Olaplex,
it doesn't matter what company you hear from. Ingredient decks are unable to show bias. Here is some food for thought from Dr. Eric Pressly "The analogy that I gave when speaking to a bunch of future scientists about Olaplex recently regarding this issue was: Imagine you invent a car, then your competitor has a rock and says that it does the same thing and they push it down a hill and it rolls too. It’s painfully clear the rock is not a car but how do you frame that argument." Several knock offs actually share the same ingredient deck with 3 or 4 more knockoffs private labeled from most likely the same manufacturer. If their chemistry was revolutionary, why would it be under multiple names? If it actually worked, why wouldn't Cosmoprof have brought it on when they had every opportunity prior to launching Olaplex? Marketing and science are two entirely separate things and it's important to recognize that as stylists both for yourself and your clients.


As far as "timing" goes: If you are having any issues with lift or processing time, this can be solved by using less Olaplex. The biggest thing to keep in mind is the fact that lighteners have differing levels of lift. Some being 9+ and others being only 5 levels means Olaplex should be adjusted based on the product you are using.

Adding Olaplex to your lightener is highly important and should be done if possible instead of doing just a treatment after. By adding Olaplex to your lightener, you are able to mitigate damage during the process. Using No.2 after finds more of the disulfide bonds and cross links them back together. By not adding No.1 to your lightener, lightener will in turn do more damage which means the treatment would have to find even more disulfide bonds and cross link them back together.

Olaplex itself will not effect tonality in anyway whatsoever. If you feel you are not getting enough lift and not getting past that "orangey" tone, process longer or cut the amount of Olaplex used in half. This has been used extensively with every single lightener on the market and we want everyone to achieve beautiful results. If 1/8oz is not working for 30-60g with on-scalp application / balayage, cut down to 1/16oz.

As for those working with 40vol as the highest, you have a few different options. The first being that you may process for an additional period of time. If working under time constraints, you may use heat checking every 3-5 minutes as you normally would. Your other option would be to cut the amount of Olaplex down until you find what works based on your personal preferences.

I have experienced every single issue mentioned above myself personally. The most important thing is learning that things can and should be changed based on the products that you are using. When we got the product, there were no directions. I have personally been responsible for having to highlight clients multiple times by adding too much. I've also pushed hair too far as well. This is a learning process for everyone and I ask that you just experiment and find what works!


Again: Dropbox - phlex.mp4


Colorphlex itself, ingredients are as follows: water, hydrolyzed vegetable protein or PG Propyl Silanetriol which is an artificially modified amino acid from vegetables and film forming compound, and phenoxyethanol which is used as a preservative. No real comparison in regards to chemistry versus Olaplex. It also claims to be patented and actually lacks one. As a stylist, I would never buy something from a company who lies to make a profit, and that there is so much proof, you can find on many forums, that it does not hold up and actually damages worse than bleach itself. Protect your clients hair and your reputation as a stylist and find the facts before being sold by someone who if paid to promote. Olaplex has never advertised. The results speak for themselves. I am here simply to help shut down misinformation and provide the actual chemistry so as to help stylists not end up with some of the horror stories I have to hear from "knock off" use on a daily basis.
This is Scott Breed, Director of Education for colorpHlex.

I have been away for a while, so I apologize for being slow to respond to Ab's post, but I simply must reply now. I will be brief and to the point as possible.

In regard to "artificially modified amino acid from vegetables", of course that is true. This molecule is engineered and synthesized for a purpose. Then again so is Olaplex's active ingredient, Bis-Aminopropy Diglycol Dimaleate, it does not come in that form from vegetables, fruits or animals, otherwise it would not be patentable.

As I have also stated earlier, the active ingredient in colorpHlex that we trademarked as ColorStrong Complex is patented by our supplier of that ingredient and the US Patent # is; 8048846. I won't call you a liar for calling our company a liar, but what you said is misinformation.

You are certainly correct in the statement that Olaplex and colorpHlex have "No real comparison in regards to chemistry..", except we do seem to use the same preservative, phenoxyethanol.

I will challenge some of your other comments in those separate posts.
 
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Scott Breed

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I'll explain it with color and lightener for you. When peroxide enters the hair to lighten your natural pigments, it also splits disulfide bonds that give the hair strength and integrity. These pairs turn into single sulfur-hydrogen bonds. If one oxygen molecule created by this peroxide reaction links up with a single, that's a perfect pair. However, as some of these oxygen molecules move in packs of three, they can attach to sulfur-hydrogen bonds and trigger a reaction that eats protein out of the hair leaving it dry and frayed. Olaplex eliminates this reaction, creating a new bond that is actually stronger than the original disulfide. This chain with two reactive ends may also find these singles without the presence of peroxide or color in the hair therefore being able to restore the strength, structure and integrity. Hopefully that was in depth enough. Let me know if you have any other question
To clarify a point of chemistry, Olaplex states in their patent, as Ab has stated here, that the active ingredient in Olaplex is engineered to bond to sulfhydryls which are created when the cystine bond is reduced. Reduction is the chemical term used when hydrogen is combined with another element or compound. This is the process that takes place during permanent waving. As Ab pointed out, oxidation (the combining of oxygen with an element or compound) is the action that is taking place in coloring and bleaching (not reduction) which also cleaves or breaks the cystine bond, but that oxidation results in the formation of cysteic acid which is characterized by SO3 groups not SH or sulfhydryl groups. With this fact it is confusing to know what bond Olaplex is actually forming since there are no sulfhydryl groups to attach to.

The siloxane portion of the ColorStrong Complex molecule forms a covalent bond with the sulfur portion of the cysteic acids created by the oxidation. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are not water soluble and these bonds lock the protein portion of the ColorStrong Complex molecule to the keratin chain, which means that the effects are not rinse or easily shampooed out of the hair. In addition, ColorStrong will co-polymerize actually adding protein structure to the hair.
 

Scott Breed

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Maleic Acid is in fact patented. Heres the patent numbers:
Patent No. 9,144,537

Patent No. 9,095,518

With 6 pending for Olaplex
Scott Breed, Director of Education, colorpHlex

I believe these patent numbers are for Bis-Aminopropy Diglycol Dimaleate, the active ingredient in Olaplex. Maleic acid, along with guar gum, are part of the precursors or ingredients used to manufacture Bis-Aminopropy Diglycol Dimaleate. There is obviously a big difference in Bis-Aminopropy Diglycol Dimaleate and maleic acid.

Maleic acid is used in several ways in industry and is synthesized in several ways. Some of those methods are patented, but maleic acid is not.
 

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