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What ingredients makes acrylic yellow?

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Karen

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Hi All

I guess this question is for Mr Geek or Geeg - which cleaning chemicals or cosmetic ingredients can make acrylic yellow?

I understand tea bags and self tanning lotions can cause yellowing, but is there anything, in say, washing-up liquid or body lotion?

I ask as I've noticed my extensions (Retention+) are yellowing ever so slightly in zone two. I have no lifting and it can be buffed off, so it is definitely not the start of a greenie.

I must admit I'm guilty of rinsing a cup or two under the sink with washing-up liquid - could this be the cause? The only other thing I can think of is body lotion???

I just wondered if any one could tell me a particular ingredient to steer clear of.

The odd thing is that it's only the pink that seems to discolour - the soft white is fine!

Any suggestions?

Karen
 

geeg

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I doubt very much if it could be washing up liquid ... we all use it and I for one never ever wear gloves ... if there was something out there that affected R+ we would surely know about it.

My guess is that your brush may be contaminated?? find out by dipping in monomer liquid and then squeezing out the liquid between a gauze pad (as if you were cleaning it.) If the brush is contaminated you will see the yellow right away on the pad. Try that and let me know and we will go from there.
 

Karen

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Hi Geeg,

Thank you for your speedy reply.

I did as you said and dipped the brush in monomer and squeezed it in between a gauze pad and the monomer stayed purple - no yellow colouring. :?

Could it be my ratio? Until recently I was still getting air bubbles. With a lot of practise they seam to be getting less, but I still have some of the old acrylic with the air bubbles on my nails.

Perhaps I should soak them all off and put a new set on? I was thinking of doing this anyway as I tried my hand at sculpting and a couple are lopsided.

It's not a huge problem - my nails don't look nicotine stained as if I smoke forty a day - but they just don't look nice and pink like the ones in the pictures that are posted on this board.

Any other advise would be greatly appreciated.

Karen
 

The Geek

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I guess this question is for Mr Geek or Geeg - which cleaning chemicals or cosmetic ingredients can make acrylic yellow?

I understand tea bags and self tanning lotions can cause yellowing, but is there anything, in say, washing-up liquid or body lotion?
There are many factors to take into consideration when you see yellowing of the nail enhancement.

There are really 2 types of yellowing that here, we shall call 'internal' or 'superficial'

Internal yellowing is caused by:
  • Contamination - will usually occur within an hour and simply means that there was something in your 'mix' that shouldn’t be there.
  • Incompatibility - will usually occur within a couple of days. This is when you are using something that isn’t designed to do what you did with it. A good example is getting acidic primers on old product.
  • UV Light - UV light can be so powerful that it can yellow a piece of paper in a couple of hours. UV light can cause any enhancement to yellow. On the good side, most decent systems will have UV absorbers and optical brighteners to prevent any visible signs of yellowing for the life of the enhancements.

Superficial yellowing is really no more than staining. If (after removing any enamel from the enhancement) you see yellow on the enhancement and it buffs off quickly and easily, its simply stained.
There are a variety of things that can cause this and virtually all of them can be prevented by ensuring a smooth surface through buffing and in some instances using at least a clear coat on the nails.

Anyhooo.... wouldn’t be your mix.

Hope this helps.
 
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