Advice please - apprentice didn't attend a training course

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TheDuchess

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Hi all, I'd like some advice please.

I have a very new apprentice who I booked on to a 4 day private training course. On the first day she texted me in a panic early because the trains weren't running. I didn't hear my phone (there was a missed call) and didn't see the text straight away. I was fully booked, back to back.

When I finally had a chance to text her back there was no response. It was lunch-time by the time I established contact and discovered that she hadn't gone to the training. By this time she had already discovered that if she was a no show for day one then she couldn't attend days 2-4.

My issues are that

1. There was information on the train website about alternative modes of transport. There was a bus service running and I'd given her money to pay for her transport

2. She didn't come into work - and if she had done I could have stuck her on a bus and got her there late but still OK to complete the course.

3. She didn't get herself to the course even after she found out how serious it was to miss a day - and the journey is reasonably straightforward, it doesn't involve long distance travel to a busy city.

So my question is how do I handle this?

I don't think I am being unreasonable in expecting her to have got herself to the course.
I don't think it is unreasonable to expect her to have continued to attempt to get in touch for advice by some other means when I didn't respond to her texts - she didn't ring the salon line nor email us.
I don't think it is unreasonable to have expected her to have turned up for work (her normal start time is 9:30)

I can dismiss her of course - (I can do this legally, I checked) I'd rather give her another chance but am I being soft? My concern is her inability to handle this sensibly. I'm sure if she was trying to get herself to a concert with tickets that she had paid for herself she would have at least attempted the journey. I'm not sure if I'm chucking good money after bad by keeping her on. Is she a complete waste of space?

What do you think?
 
How old is she?
How mature is she generally and at work?

I suspect, reading between the lines, she's quite young and probably very inexperienced in the big wide world, so instead of making an effort she gave up.

If she's mature at work, helpful and eager to learn then I might give her the benefit of the doubt and try again. Sounds like you'll need to explain exactly what is expected from her if things don't go to plan, ie. either get there some other way or come to work, don't just quit, and call me to let me know.

Again, reading between the lines, I suspect there is a shortage of common sense, but that could be age related and she just got bit overwhelmed so froze.

Only you can judge if she's worth the extra effort based on her performance in other situations so far.
 
Usually when train services are cancelled, the train company run busses that go from station to station so although she might have been a bit late, she would have arrived eventually. At 19, I'd expect her to apply some common sense in trying to get herself to the training venue.

If it was me, I'd arrange a meeting and see what she has to say, then depending on my gut instinct, I'd probably let her go. If she didn't go to the training due to transport issues, I'd at least have expected her to turn up at the salon. Do you have access to her Facebook account to see if she posted anything telling on there?

There's a lot of newly qualified therapists out there desperate for a chance who wouldn't throw it away so casually.
 
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Have you lost the money from the training course? If not, then you can maybe give her another chance. If you have then I would seriously consider letting her go.
 
Thanks fellow Geeks. I was planning a meeting with her but we've been booked solid all day. I said to her that id need to discuss the training with her - but that was after I'd picked my jaw off the floor when she asked "am I going to be rebooked?" Straight out. No apology.

She's 19 and already level 2 qualified. She's had a year of looking for beauty work whilst working in a roadside catering van. She started the day reading text books and pretty much doing nothing. If I'd had a meeting with her before lunch I'd have let her go.

But I told her she needs to work and she began to cotton on. I'm very undecided. I wasnt expecting her in this week so I haven't got any gaps where I can take her somewhere private (ie not in the salon). And I'm anxious about the delay. It means she isn't being properly managed.
 
Get her in to help with other treatments maybe? Then you can book some time for a sit down next week. I don't know, it's a hard one. Sometimes teens just blurt out whatever they're thinking without it going through the brain first, not realising how it comes across.
 
I would trust your instinct and if it isn't working out, tell her you need to let her go. I would be concerned about her work ethic, if this is now when she should be really keen and enthusiastic, imagine a few months down the line! She basically gave herself the day off and thought it would be OK! Maybe she didn't want to do the course and this was her way out. It definitly should warrant a disciplinary if you decide to keep her but I Would be livid if it were me! I'm sure there are plenty of other willing people out there who would jump at the opportunity.
 
Thanks everyone

It's been really helpful to be able to run this past fellow geeks. I've sat her down for a firm but fair heart to heart. She looked properly concerned and genuinely grateful to be given a chance to prove herself. We'll see...
 
i will be honest here, she is young and may well have panicked with the travel. when i first started going out on my own in the big wide world i panicked. A LOT! and even as an adult now i have a big fear of being told off so i hide rather then face up. may be she is also like this? glad you have had a meeting with her and she seemed remorseful. be kind but fair, ensure she is pulling her weight and is getting stuck in with tasks and being a team member.

sometimes we seem to forget that these youngsters are starting to make their way in the world, some would have been shown the world at a younger age then others but we were all like this at some point. sometimes i do also think that not everyone is capable of being thrown in at the deep end and a bit more coaxing to bring them round may be needed.

i get we have businesses to run but we do also hold the responsibility of shaping the younger generations work ethic so to me encouragement over discipline is always my line. personally having been bought up very strictly i have found that this has had a massive effect on the way i am now and i am not the happy, confident person that i should be in my working life.

may have been a bit of a ramble here sorry
 
It's definatley something my drippy juniors would do, sometimes were pulling out hair out thinking :mad: WHY!?!?! And their oblivious to any problem! :oops:

My favourite saying is "we're not born knowing everything" and it's true, o_O if you have no life lessons on a certain subject then you wouldn't have a clue it's bad, now she knows & she shouldn't make the same sort of mistake again :)

I just hope it hadn't put you out of pocket too much
 
I haven't read all replies.

But, at 19, I would have noway travelled alone for a course. I would have literally wet myself. Especially if I had to catch a train!

Recently i went to a course and there were two girls who weren't doing as we were shown when the educator said this wasn't how she'd shown the two girls turned around and said they couldn't see... To which the educator replied, well you need to move!

These two girls were young looking and I think, because they didn't pay for it, they didn't give a hoot. You can definitely tell which people were paying for their own courses!
 
I think everybody's different how they are at a certain age and I used to struggle to relate to this as at 15 I was reliable and could have caught a train and held down a job never mind 19 when I'd had my own place for 3 years and a full time job. However I think some people do start a little later as maybe they weren't forced to go out and work and be responsible so young so maybe take this into account when you decide what to do I have had apprentices who have been awful at first then with a bit of guidance turn out ok you just have to spell everything out and not relate them to how you were at that age.
 
Thanks fellow Geeks. I was planning a meeting with her but we've been booked solid all day. I said to her that id need to discuss the training with her - but that was after I'd picked my jaw off the floor when she asked "am I going to be rebooked?" Straight out. No apology.

She's 19 and already level 2 qualified. She's had a year of looking for beauty work whilst working in a roadside catering van. She started the day reading text books and pretty much doing nothing. If I'd had a meeting with her before lunch I'd have let her go.

But I told her she needs to work and she began to cotton on. I'm very undecided. I wasnt expecting her in this week so I haven't got any gaps where I can take her somewhere private (ie not in the salon). And I'm anxious about the delay. It means she isn't being properly managed.

that attitude.. sorry I couldn't take that wouldn't be sympathetic... if it was a gig or shopping trip or holiday I'm sure she would have got there one way or another... total lack of interest or consideration for you or interest in work... if it were me I'd look to get rid of her...

...sorry geeks I know sounds harsh compared to other replies but the ones like this are only going to be trouble
 
This boils my pizz and I'm going to upset a few people here

From my experience with my small biz and my hubby so sign biz and reading social groups on Facebook.

SOME young people don't want to work, or want money for doing nothing. Any excuse to not go into work or do anything.
Not all young people, but some!

I've not caught a train for years, I'm lucky I drive.
If I was catching a train to get to an appointment I would look at the arrival times and plan my journey. Catching a train that arrives at my destination with minutes to spare is a recipe for disaster. I'd want to arrive with at least 30 mins to spare for the appointment. If one train was alittle too close I'd choose to arrive an hour early.
Surely this is how you do it?

With ref to the apprentice I'd ask her to pay for the missed appointment and then put her on a warning. Any future courses I'd make her pay then pay her for the course once completed.

if she isn't any good then just cut the chaff, it's so hard in any business we can't carry dead wood
 
I wouldn't use her age as excuse for not wanting being motivated and not wanting to seek alternative public transportation to the training centre.

I think tbh she just didn't give a damn, the fact that's it's taken her a year to find a suitable position could be a red flag too.

From the ages of 18 to 20 I was a trainee police woman in 1990s dealing with things you wouldn't even see in a channel 4 documentary or the BBCs Happy Valley and I grew up very fast and was a very responsible person and could travel anywhere on any mode of transportation.

I could adapt to situations around me ....

The are lots of people in their late teens that are mature and responsible and have a good work ethic, some which are better than those in their 20s, 30s, 40s, etc.

I feel that this young lady is not suitable for your business, as she does not have the drive and determination to learn or commit to training.

If you do keep her on, she has to prove herself at her job more before another training course is offered and if she does prove herself I would recommend that you set an agreement were you deduct the cost of training out of her weekly or monthly wages so she pays for it herself so she is more motivated to go.
 
I wouldn't use her age as excuse for not wanting being motivated and not wanting to seek alternative public transportation to the training centre.

I think tbh she just didn't give a damn, the fact that's it's taken her a year to find a suitable position could be a red flag too.

From the ages of 18 to 20 I was a trainee police woman in 1990s dealing with things you wouldn't even see in a channel 4 documentary or the BBCs Happy Valley and I grew up very fast and was a very responsible person and could travel anywhere on any mode of transportation.

I could adapt to situations around me ....

The are lots of people in their late teens that are mature and responsible and have a good work ethic, some which are better than those in their 20s, 30s, 40s, etc.

I feel that this young lady is not suitable for your business, as she does not have the drive and determination to learn or commit to training.

If you do keep her on, she has to prove herself at her job more before another training course is offered and if she does prove herself I would recommend that you set an agreement were you deduct the cost of training out of her weekly or monthly wages so she pays for it herself so she is more motivated to go.

Couldn't agree more, she didn't even appologize, I would live my house 2 hours early to make sure I am not late. I would not waste my time with her.
 
I'm afraid I agree. I'm 42 now but when I was 18 I was sent on a facial brand course about 3 hrs away from home. I remember being really nervous about getting there and finding the place. I got there an hour early because I was so scared that I would get lost!!!
 
Thanks everyone for your interest. I thought I'd give you all an update. I went on a training course myself this week, the same place my apprentice was booked on and the Trainer said "what happened?" So I shared a little

Everyone else on the course (everyone an employee except me) looked appalled. One blurted out "does she still work for you?" Another said "yes that's what I was going to say'" everyone agreed. Including a 19yr old who started off as an apprentice. She said "my boss would've killed me!"

But so far, touch wood, she's been doing better. Finding things to do and running around a bit more. And my lovely therapists are taking her in hand a bit - stopping me from turning my own room around and sending her in instead whilst giving me that "chill, slow your speed" sign

I've told her firmly that I need her to be more savvy as otherwise it isn't worth my time investing in her, and I've also told her that I am a great boss and the opportunity to work in my salon is going to look great on her CV. I think the others have also told her this. So she's learning and I've learnt too. I'm not spending too much money on her for a bit but I'll give her a chance to prove herself.
 
Thank you for updating us on your progress so far.
I'm glad that she's obviously making an effort to improve.

Fingers crossed, this blip will be a distant memory in time.
 

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