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Bodacious

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http://www.e-nails.org/

has any one done one of these courses or heard of them????

If so, would you recomened it???
 

naturalnails

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Having read the bumf on the site I certainly would not recommend this course if you are serious about your trade.

1. It is not that inexpensive - £235 for 2 days compared to for example Creative training at approx £500 for 4 days.

The following quotes are taken directly from the site and certainly the Fibreglass quote will have Ruth jumping up and down LOL.

Silk and Fibreglass Wraps

These are old systems that are rarely used any more. Pieces of silk or fibreglass are cut into shape and then layered upon the fingernail using resin. The resin sets quickly when it is sprayed with an activator.

The wraps are natural looking although the nails created are not particularly strong and the process is quite time consuming. We do not recommend offering these systems as we do not consider them to be cost effective
They have obviously not heard of the new age gel systems LOL
Gel Nails

Gel nails are perfect for people who only want an overlay on their natural nails and not an extension. Gel is very easy to apply, looks natural and gives strength to weak nails. You will be told how to apply it on our course.

The problem with gel is, it doesn't soak off in acetone. For this reason we do not recommend it for extensions. It is fine for overlays as they don't break very often.

A broken gel extension has to be filed off carefully by hand. A broken acrylic extension can be soaked off in acetone while you are working on someone else, or by the client before you see them, freeing up your time.
Sculptured Acrylic

This was the first acrylic nail to come out over 25 years ago. Although many improvements have been made the basic concept is still the same. The acrylic sets in the air, giving you a limited time to apply it. In practice this makes it probably the hardest system to learn.

We recommend you get your time down to under an hour on the UV acrylics before you try sculptured nails. This will provide you with the skill and speed necessary to apply the liquid and powder before it sets. It can be very frustrating and require a lot of hard work if you don't do this.

Most nail technicians use an electric drill to file sculptured nails. If the nail is over-drilled it gets too hot and damage occurs to the nail bed, matrix or both. This can be permanent.

The more skilled you are at applying the acrylic, the less filing you need to do. This makes it quicker for you and more comfortable for the client.
UV Cured Acrylic

This is the system taught on the course. It has the flexibility and natural look of the gel nail, but it is an acrylic and will soak off in acetone.

Because this acrylic doesn't set until it is placed under a UV lamp it is self levelling and pretty much a perfect shape once it is cured. This means a light filing with a hand file is all that is needed and there is no need for an expensive electric drill (£300+).

The other benefits of UV acrylic over sculptured are, it doesn't discolour when it is subjected to sunlight, it doesn't crystallise when it gets cold and it doesn't have any odour. All this is good news for you and your clients.

UV acrylic is more expensive than sculptured, but it still costs less than £1 a set to apply and once you are up to speed you should easily be able to apply a set of these in under an hour.
I would certainly give this one a miss.
 

JackieMc

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I haven't heard of this training school but had a look at the website just now. Couple of points:

They don't actually say what system they use - this always starts the warning signs with me, I like to know I'm being trained to use a quality product;

They don't recomend using gel or fibre glass as a means of extension, they actually go on to say that fibre glass isn't very popular and that gel isn't strong enough for extensions - I think there are a few people on this site who use both these systems who might disagree with these statements;

They teach UV light cured cured acrylic only- well, I think a training school should offer more than one system, having maybe a 'try-me' day so you can decide which one is for you.

If you are seriously thinking of training I would recommend going to one of the 'leaders' in the nail industry: Creative Nail Design, EZ Flow, and NSI all have very good training courses and I'm sure at least one of them must be near your location.
 

JackieMc

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Ok...... so Fiona and I were typing at the same time! ;)
 

Snickers

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Hi Geeks

I would say, I think they have make it sound quite good and if I had seen that a few months ago I may have considered giving it a go but since finding this site would definitely think about going with CND.

x
 

Nailsinlondon1

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Silk and Fibreglass Wraps

These are old systems that are rarely used any more. Pieces of silk or fibreglass are cut into shape and then layered upon the fingernail using resin. The resin sets quickly when it is sprayed with an activator.

The wraps are natural looking although the nails created are not particularly strong and the process is quite time consuming. We do not recommend offering these systems as we do not consider them to be cost effective .

Yes Fiona I am jumping lol.....................Obviously not a Fibreglass Technician who wrote this so not true statement!!!!!!

Not strong , yea right they havn't seen a decend set of Fabric# then ..............Not cost effective lmfao.....yep thats why I have a full book every week and earn a pretty penny.................

If this how they explain the difference and pro and cons between systems I would stay well cear.................
Go to an Educator that provides sound and true pros and cons................
Go to an Educator that is up to date of what is happening in the industry, not one that obviously doesn't keep up to date with whats what in the latest of Nail Technology......................
Or maybe all they can do is UV L&P?????
What a load of twaddle xxxxxxxxxxx
 

Bodacious

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Thanks for that always better to run things past other people who kow what they are talking about!
 

talented talons

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As Ruth says they know sweet F A about all nail systems. It sounds to me they can only actually teach acrylic lite.

I can't beleive they were making such sweeping statements when it comes to other systems!!!

I would steer well clear of this one.
 

twiggysue

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Don't knock what you haven tried.

The 2 day course is very good and you are taught everything you need to know.

The course is so popular they get thousands of pupils through a year.

They must tell you what system they use because you just told us that they only teach uv light cured acrylic only.

They do use a quality product.

I have worn acrylic nails for 4 years and think they are the best I tryed gel nails a few months ago and thought they were rubbish they are not strong and they take to much looking after.
but we all have our own prefrences.

Good luck to anyone who is learning to put nails on.
ITS NOT ROCKET SCIENCE. LOL
 

claire 1

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I have to agree with Sue,
I also attended the e-nails course and our trainor Hazel has over twenty years experience with nails, the course was informative and all the products used were from the Edge, which is what Leighton Denny uses for all his acrylic work, and we all know who he is.

Just because CND courses are £500 for four days, by comparison the e-nails course is good value for money, and is a good sound introduction to acrylic nails.

So stop being nail tech snobs and stop knocking what you have yet to try.

regards
claire
newbie geek
 

twiggysue

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I HAVE BEEN ON THE 2 DAY COURSE AT E-NAILS.

The course was very good you were taught everything you need to know about nails from the structure to contra indications even how to set up your own business,deal with clients,equipment (what to use where to buy it) and how to apply acrylic nails.

If you have any problems after the course you just ring or e mail and they will help you out. You can even have as much extra tuition as you need at no extra cost.

If you cant apply them after a two day course I would give up because it is so easy all you need is the practice afterwards.

I would recomend this course to anyone.

GOOD LUCK AND ENJOY.
 

naturalnails

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We should do a poll in 5 years time and find out how many people did a 2 day course this year and nothing else training wise ever - I wonder how many will still be in a flourishing nail business.

It is not about being nail tech or product snobs it is about doing the best for your clients and the nail industry as a whole.
 

claire 1

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Look Fiona,

Why does going on a two, three or four week course make you any better,
Its about the trainer at the end of the day, and Hazel at e-nails is very good she has twenty years experience for god sake, and in those two days we were given homework, all tested individually about nail structure, diseases etc, I am getting really annoyed that you seem to think a two day course is less worthy than a four day course costing £500.

I will willingly take part in a poll as i already have a flourishing business, I just needed to up date my skills thats why a two day course was ample for me.

So please unless you have attended this course then i dont think you have the right to say whether it was good bad or indifferent, i was always told its bad business to run down other peoples business's.

So anyone considering e-nails for £235.00 it is well worth the money.
 

pretty&pampered

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I'd just like to say that i choose to use a system that most people have never heard of. I did all my training at home and the clients that i have are pleased with the result. I'm sure if you request more info from them you can decide whats best. I think a good technician makes the most of whatever system they use you can always convert to another system anyway in the future.
 

naturalnails

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Sorry Claire,

I wasn't running down a 2, 3, 4 day / week course as such what I was running down was the fact that some people do ONLY a 2 day course and never do any other training ever.

However the e-nails course information does not come across on the website as a very good course with current thinking.

Please don't get upset with me because I don't agree with this form of training based on the information on the website. I agree you seemed to cover lots of stuff in your 2 days but I have seen what some techs produce after only doing a 2 day course.

I have seen lots of people who have done a 2 day training course and then within 6 months have set themselves up as trainers which is certainly not very good for the industry.

I am glad that you have a flourishing business and you have used this course as a refresher of your skills and not the only training you have done.

We were asked to give our opinions of this course based solely on the website information - nowhere on the site does it say that Hazel is even a nail technician - it says she is an asssessor and teacher but nothing about nails. I apologise if I have misinterpreted the information - maybe the website needs to be more detailed in the qualifications of the teacher after all most of us have come up with the wrong impression of this course from the website alone.
 

claire 1

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Hi Fiona,

I understand what your saying, but i'm pretty sure if you relook at the site it does state that the trainer has twenty years experience.

All i was trying to say is this course as either a refresher or as a basic starting point then it is good value for money, if techs choose to never retrain then i agree they wont be in business for long, but this isnt the fault of the two day course or the trainer its the fault of the nail tech.

Regards
Claire
 

Gordon Rice

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The original question was
"has any one done one of these courses or heard of them?"

I would be extremely surprised if anyone who had been on an e-nails course would give a negative reply.

A few questions were raised. Is Hazel a nail technician?

To be an NVQ assessor you need to have an NVQ and several years experience in the subject you are teaching, in all systems. Hazel also has a PGCE in teaching, the equivalent of a Master's degree. It's not mentioned on the web site because it sounds a bit too much!

Many companies use trainers who are purely nail technicians. They may not know how to teach effectively. Hazel is graded, by government standards, at the highest level it is possible to achieve.

The course is only two days because innovative training techniques are used. As the students say, Hazel is an exceptional teacher and the course is excellent value.

e-nails have been sent people to train by several government agencies and Learn Direct for many years.

Is the information up to date? The web page quoted is designed to be an easy guide for newcomers and says they might like to learn other systems. Gels are covered on the course and are not described as weak.

Not many people offer wraps. Drills, normally used with sculptured nails, can cause trauma to the natural nail plate. Fumes are also a problem with this system. No brands are mentioned.

Every e-nails student signs a declaration that they understand they have not been trained as teachers and will not train anyone else without the relevant qualifications.

The brand used is not mentioned because branded products typically cost three to five times as much as unbranded and often come from the same factory. Monomer and polymer production, composition and characteristics are interesting fields, but not necessarily to nail technicians. Why pay several times the price for virtually the same product?

The majority of information imparted on a nail technician course has little to do with the system used. Health and safety, anatomy of the hand and arm, structure of the nail, setting up a business, dealing with clients, sealing and shaping the extension does not vary.

e-nails offer a course that is respected by both students and professional bodies. It is recognised by Professional Beauty and The Guild of Professional Beauty Therapists, who have looked at it long and hard and offer our students inexpensive insurance. It is an academic course, not a product course designed to push a company's goods. Students are free to use any system upon completion.

Hopefully legislation will be passed that only trained, qualified professionals can teach beauty therapists and nail technicians. Hazel's standing and expertise will ensure that e-nails is still around when many of the so-called 'industry leaders' have had to re-think their training programs.

Every student that has attended has signed a comments book, which is freely available for anyone to read. I hesitate to mention this, but many of them have less than glowing remarks on many of the other courses mentioned, which they also attended.

Thank you for the support from past students and thank you for alerting me to this forum. I wish you every success and, as always, if there is anything I can do please do not hesitate to contact me.

gordon@e-nails.org
 

geeg

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A few comments!

QUOTE=Gordon Rice]The original question was
"has any one done one of these courses or heard of them?"

I would be extremely surprised if anyone who had been on an e-nails course would give a negative reply.

A few questions were raised. Is Hazel a nail technician?

To be an NVQ assessor you need to have an NVQ and several years experience in the subject you are teaching, in all systems. Hazel also has a PGCE in teaching, the equivalent of a Master's degree. It's not mentioned on the web site because it sounds a bit too much!

I am an assessor and got my D32,33,34 and 36 before I completed my NVQ unit in Artificial Nail Structures. At no time during my assessors training were nails mentioned ... just the process of assessing.

Not sure what you mean by and NVQ in all systems?? And until things change in September (hopefuly) there is no such thing as an NVQ in nails. Artificial Nail Structures forms only one (1) unit of a full NVQ in Beauty therapy and is not an NVQ in its own right, Nor does one have to be proficient in all 3 systems (only one) to acheive it.


How can anyone know if you don't tell them? I would think that prospective students would want this type of assurance altho PGCE wouldn't mean much to most people .... should be spelled out to them.

Many companies use trainers who are purely nail technicians. They may not know how to teach effectively. Hazel is graded, by government standards, at the highest level it is possible to achieve.

The course is only two days because innovative training techniques are used. As the students say, Hazel is an exceptional teacher and the course is excellent value.

???? Would just love to know what these innovative tecniques are that teach a person a difficult skill as well as all the underpinning knowledge necessary to start and build a thriving business and all in just 2 days ????

e-nails have been sent people to train by several government agencies and Learn Direct for many years.

Is the information up to date? The web page quoted is designed to be an easy guide for newcomers and says they might like to learn other systems. Gels are covered on the course and are not described as weak.

Not many people offer wraps. Drills, normally used with sculptured nails, can cause trauma to the natural nail plate. Fumes are also a problem with this system. No brands are mentioned.

It is true that wraps as a primary service do not comprise the largest segment of the nail market but this segment is growing. One can no longer classify systems generically (re. products being strong or weak or this or that) as new innovation is producing systems that are proving to be exceptions to the old rules.

As for 'fumes' ... incorrect terminology. Vapours are particles carried in air ... nail systems produce vapours. Fumes are particles carried in smoke ... unless the salon is on fire or someone is smoking at the nail table, Fumes are not produced in a nail salon. This is information taught to beginners on day 1.


Every e-nails student signs a declaration that they understand they have not been trained as teachers and will not train anyone else without the relevant qualifications.

And who enforces this 'declaration'??? At this moment in time there is no one who can stop anyone (qualified or not) from setting up a nail school and supposedly training anyone who will pay them

The brand used is not mentioned because branded products typically cost three to five times as much as unbranded and often come from the same factory. Monomer and polymer production, composition and characteristics are interesting fields, but not necessarily to nail technicians. Why pay several times the price for virtually the same product?

REAL Branded lines are manufactured NOT bought from a supplier and re-labeled. The line you are using as quoted in another post is not a brand but a private lable and is not manufactured by those selling it. As such you are correct, it is similar if not the same as many other lines. When one teaches with cutting edge, innovative true branded lines, then chemical knowledge becomes very important so the technician knows how the product works differently from all those other generic lines. As they say, "you can't educate what you don't innovate".

The majority of information imparted during a nail technician course has little to do with the system used. Health and safety, anatomy of the hand and arm, structure of the nail, setting up a business, dealing with clients, sealing and shaping the extension does not vary.

e-nails offer a course that is respected by both students and professional bodies. It is recognised by Professional Beauty and The Guild of Professional Beauty Therapists, who have looked at it long and hard and offer our students inexpensive insurance. It is an academic course, not a product course designed to push a company's goods. Students are free to use any system upon completion.

Well actually the're not free to use any system because there are some companies who would not let your students buy their products to use after only completeing a 2 day course. I am very surprised that PB or the Guild offer insurance to students who have attended only a 2 day course -must look into that) it has always been my understanding that they do not support courses of such short duration

Hopefully legislation will be passed that only trained, qualified professionals can teach beauty therapists and nail technicians. Hazel's standing and expertise will ensure that e-nails is still around when many of the so-called 'industry leaders' have had to re-think their training programs.

I whole heartedly agree and I'm sure Hazel is an excellent teacher but as you say, that legislation is not in place and at the moment anyone can do it as stated above.

Every student that has attended has signed a comments book, which is freely available for anyone to read. I hesitate to mention this, but many of them have less than glowing remarks on many of the other courses mentioned, which they also attended.

Thank you for the support from past students and thank you for alerting me to this forum. I wish you every success and, as always, if there is anything I can do please do not hesitate to contact me.

gordon@e-nails.org[/QUOTE]
 

Gordon Rice

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NVQ assessors can only teach subjects they are qualified in. Hazel is a fully qualified beauty therapist.

The PGCE is the Postgraduate Certificate in Education. This is the highest qualification attainable in teaching.

There are two days of contact time on the e-nails course. Some home study and practice is also necessary. The UV acrylic is easy to apply and because it is self-levelling filing time is reduced dramatically.

As pointed out, the hazardous emissions from sculptured acrylic liquids are vapours not fumes.

Some companies sell franchises so that people they have trained can teach others! We don't do this.

Anyone considering a course would be well advised to check that the lecturer has recognised teaching qualifications. They should also ensure the certificate is independently recognised if they don't want to be tied to one, usually expensive, supplier.

Finally, if you haven't been on an e-nails course please don't post unfounded comments about them. It is unprofessional, discourteous and it upsets people who have trained with us.
 

Fab Freak

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Silk and Fibreglass Wraps

These are old systems that are rarely used any more. Pieces of silk or fibreglass are cut into shape and then layered upon the fingernail using resin. The resin sets quickly when it is sprayed with an activator.

The wraps are natural looking although the nails created are not particularly strong and the process is quite time consuming. We do not recommend offering these systems as we do not consider them to be cost effective.



Oh dear me I better stop doing Wrap Nails - now lol...come on please - this is detrimental to the business -i cant beleive a so called reputable company would publish such twoddle - Dont you think you should update your web site....Have you not heard of Fabric and Future Wrap by OPI.....this indsutry changes all the time and looks like you might be standing still...

I qualified over a year ago now with Star nails and I still 90% of my clients wear and prefer wraps to L&P wether UV or not...plus any of the acrylic family look natural (depending on the technicians application)....and I would be very interested to know on what you based your comment on of Wraps not being cost effective...This is one of the plus sides to Wraps in my own opinion ie no brushes required or a UV lamp...

but I really find it frustrating to see inaccurate comments being made about other systems, do you not think

Phew off my soap box now...
 
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