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Formaldehyde / Formaldehyde Resin

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Hollyballoo

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Hi all

Just been having a little clear out from my bottles drawer and glancing at some of the ingredients labels :study: ....can someone tell me what exactly is the difference between Formaldehyde and Formaldehyde Resin? Is the latter better than the former or are they both as bad as each other :huh: ?

Thanks in advance....
 

geeg

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Formaldehyde and formaldehyde resin are two completely different 'animals'.

Formaldehyde resin is in a form that has no deleterious affect on the nail. Even people who are allergic to formaldehyde are seldom if ever affected by formaldehyde resin.

So .. yes ... it is 'better' if you like, and has none of the negative side-effects associated with formaldehyde(or formalin as it is sometimes referred to).
 

Hollyballoo

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Brilliant - thanks for that Geeg. I think I may have to invest in a good book listing all these products...I couldn't even begin to pronounce some of the names listed on one of these bottles and definitely wouldn't know what their purpose/effect on the nail is :shock:

Actually, is the Doug Schoon book the best one for listing all these products Geeg? I'd like to know what all these names are just in case an inquisitive client ever asks me :? !!
 

geeg

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I believe Doug does discuss the issue of formaldehyde vs. F - resin.

I will look it up tomorrow and get back to you. Basically, nail enamel is PAINT very similar to other types of enamel paints.

As you know the nail is non-living and therefore apart from having a slightly drying affect to the plate, enamel just sits there and 'hitches a ride' as the nail grows out. Don't think you really need to 'get into it' much more than that with your clients.

Women have been painting their nails since the 1920's (probably the Egyptians did it too - those Egyptian birds new how to enhance themselves alright) ever since Charles Revson (founder of Revlon) first introduced it to the modern world. A very pale pink --- 'ladies' did NOT wear RED!! How times have changed. And before I get any smart a--ed comments from my family ... NO I am not old enough to remember it personally - just a bit of historical knowledge I am sharing with you all.
 

Hollyballoo

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geeg said:
I will look it up tomorrow and get back to you. Basically, nail enamel is PAINT very similar to other types of enamel paints.

As you know the nail is non-living and therefore apart from having a slightly drying affect to the plate, enamel just sits there and 'hitches a ride' as the nail grows out. Don't think you really need to 'get into it' much more than that with your clients.
I wished...I have a delightful specimen of a client who likes nothing more than to ask me just about everything there is to know about everything in anything (how it works and why etc) I put her way...she likes a full breakdown of the works...basically, she wants to know the life history of a cheese sandwich if necessary ;) and it reminded me of someone a while back who also queried some nail hardener I used on her nails and was asking about Toluene and Formaldehyde so I figured I'd get myself a little bit of education so I can sound far more authoratative than I could ever possibly be in this life :tongue:. I figured I'd start with the more common ones...the rest listed on the back of one bottle alone would take me an hour to post on here so I'll save that lesson for later :huh:!!
 
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